Leslie's Guiding History Site

Subtitle

International Guiding

International Guiding

So, as we have seen, Guiding started in the UK, with it's roots lying in 1907 when Scouts started, it gained it's independence from Scouting in 1910, which it has retained ever since, with Guiding and Scouting in the UK (and in many countries) each following their own separate path.  But Guiding now exists in over 140 countries around the world - so how did it get there?

 

There were a few different ways that Guiding spread initially.  One of the most common ways was through 'ex-pats' - Britons living abroad who heard about the idea and took it to the country they were now living in - this has been the recorded way it spread to many countries, especially those in the Commonwealth, as they maintained close links to the UK and had people travelling back and forth regularly by ship.  Another method of spread was translation - people getting hold of "Scouting for Boys", translating it from English into their native language, and sharing the ideas in it.  The fact that this was successful in several countries would highlight the universality of Baden-Powell's solution to the needs of youth, as well as his appealing writing style, which was engaging enough for people to voluntarily take the time to painstakingly translate it for their own use.  The third way that we see is adaptation of existing groups.  In several countries (such as New Zealand) existing youth groups chose to incorporate Scouting/Guiding ideas into their programmes, either in addition to their existing activities, or as a replacement for what they had been doing up to then.

 

In some countries, Guiding can be said to have arrived with one known person or source, and one national organisation grew up.  In some countries Guiding arrived in various ways, and was introduced by several different people, but one group survived and thrived, with other groups either merging up or dying out (such as happened in the USA where Mrs Low's group was one of several, but happened to be the one which survived).  In other countries they have more than one organisation (often, but not exclusively, divided on faith lines) with those separate groups being represented on WAGGGS by a joint national council or umbrella organisation.  Much work to promote Guiding was done by the use of visiting trainers, particularly from the UK, who spread ideas on recruitment of Leaders and girls, and adapting the programme to the local climate and customs.  A key moment was the first World Camp, at Foxlease in 1924, where Guides from several countries had the chance to get together and compare activities, ideas and methods.  There were also the three 'friendship cruises' in the 1930s, where parties of Guiders and Scouters, headed by the World Chief Scout and Guide, set out on chartered cruise ships to visit other countries and see something of their Guiding/Scouting. 

 

On any page such as this, attempts to record how Guiding spread to any particular country must necessarily be patchy and basic - and rely almost entirely on the official information published by each country's headquarters.  But I hope that by gathering some information together, it can help us all to see how Guiding arrived at each country, and how it spread amongst different nations and cultures - and I would be happy to receive further details or updates.

 

I will list countries which are current WAGGGS members at time of writing, either independently or under the guardianship of another country.  Where available, I will provide information on them.  I have also included some information, where available, on former members of WAGGGS.  Country and Organisation names will be as given on the WAGGGS website.  By it's very nature it's a constantly-changing topic, so whilst I will apologise now for any information which is not up-to-date, I hope people will be understanding.  The page was originally created in March 2015, using information drawn from the WAGGGS website and other sources, some of that information was already up to 10 years old at that point, which illustrates the difficulty . . .

 

For the moment, the aim is to provide the name of the organisation in each country, the number of Guiding members, the names and age groups of their sections, and an outline of how Guiding arrived there where available

American Samoa

 

Started prior to 1979, follow Girl Scouts USA Programme.

Anguilla – (Europe Region)

Organisation Name: Girlguiding Anguilla

Age Groups with names:

Rainbow (5+)

Brownie (7+)

Guide (10+)

Senior Section (14-26)

Membership: 100

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Founded in 1933, a branch association of Girlguiding UK, they follow the UK programme.

Antigua & Barbuda – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Girl Guides Association of Antigua and Barbuda

Age Groups with names:

Tweenies (3 - 6+ years old)

Brownies (6+ - 10 years old)

Guides (10 - 15 years old)

Rangers (15 - 25 years old)

Young Leader (18 - 30 years old)

Membership: 662

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership):

In 1931 the first two Guide companies in Antigua were registered with The Guide Association (UK), a step that was rapidly followed by an expansion in the number of units. The Tweenie section was the last to be formed in the 1980s to satisfy the needs of the 3-6 years age group.  In 1983 The Guide Association (UK) approved a deed of transfer making the Girl Guides Association of Antigua and Barbuda self-governing in all areas of work.  A new phase began in 2002 as the Association achieved Full Membership.

Argentina – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Asociación Guías Argentinas

 

Age Groups with names:

Guías Mayores (Rangers) 16-19

Guías del Sol (Sun Guides) 13-15

Guías en Caravana (Guides in Caravan) 10-12

Alitas (Little Wings) 7-9

Pimpollitos (Small Buds) 5-6

For girls with special needs: Mariposas (Butterflies) + 10

 

Membership: 4826

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership):

When Guiding began in Argentina in 1915 it was confined to English schools, and companies and packs were registered with The Guide Association (UK). During the first 40 years the development of the Movement was hindered by many difficulties, including a governmental ban on all uniformed groups of foreign origin in 1939. The situation changed when an autonomous Guide Movement was started in 1953 and the Asociación Guías Argentinas was officially founded. In 1956 the Association was granted legal status by the Government.

Armenia – Europe Region

Organisation name: National Union of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts Of Armenia (ASTGHIK)

 

Age Groups with names (Local Name and English Language Equivalent

Parmanuhiner Ranger 16-20

Arenushner Guide 11-15

Artsvikner Brownie 6-10

 

Members: 1065

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Scouting in Armenia has an old history. The first Armenian Scouting groups were organized in 1910 in Van Orphan's houses and continued until 1922 when Scouting was officially banned and the ‘Young Pioneers’ became the official state youth organization. Scouting was reintroduced in 1988. There soon appeared a need for creating a separate movement for girls and NAGGGS "Astgik" was established in 1996.  Armenia was made an Associate Member of WAGGGS at the 31st World Conference in Manila 2002 and became a Full Member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts during the 35th World Conference that took place in Hong Kong in July 2014.

Aruba – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Het Arubaanse Padvindsters Gilde

 

Age Groups with names:

Pioneer 17-21

Padvinster Guide 11-17

Kabouter Brownie 7-11

 

Members: 304

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

In 1941 a group of women, inspired by the Guide Silver Jubilee celebrations in the Netherlands, decided to introduce girls in Aruba to Girl Guiding. In the early years the Girl Guides of Aruba worked alone, using manuals produced by the Nederlands Padvinsters Gilde (NPG). In 1946 they officially joined NPG and became part of the Region of Curaçao. In 1953 Aruba became an autonomous Region and in 1972 an independent Association within the Netherlands Antilles.  In the early 1970s and through the early 1980s, Guiding activities on the island waned, but in 1986 a revival provoked new interest in Guiding in Aruba. The Association had a new constitution, and a new name: Het Arubaanse Padvindsters Gilde (APG).  Guiding is now active in most of the country, and the APG is planning to start more groups around the island.

Australia – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Girl Guides Australia Incorporated

 

Age Groups with names

Australian Guiding no longer has separate age groups, instead each unit chooses which age range it wishes to have.

 

Members: 25077

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Founded 1911

Austria – Europe Region

Organisation name: Pfadfinder und Pfadfinderinnen Österreichs (PPO)

 

Age Groups with names (Local Name and English Language Equivalent

Ranger (Ranger) 16 - 19

Caravelle (Caravelle) 13 - 16

Pfadfinderin (Guide) 10 - 13

Wichtel (Brownie) 7 - 10

 

Members: 9983

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girl Guiding in Austria began before the First World War, with the first organisation in 1914.  A national organization was formed in 1924. But due to an increasingly difficult political situation from 1934 onwards, all Guiding activities had ceased by 1938 when many Leaders were arrested. After the Second World War Guiding activities began again throughout the country.  The Österreichischer Pfadfinderinnen-verband St Georg merged with the Pfadfinder Österreichs in 1976 to form the Pfadfinder und Pfadfinderinnen Österreichs (PPÖ).

Bahamas – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: The Bahamas Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names (Local Name and English Language Equivalent

Ranger 14-18

Guide 10-14

Brownie 7-10

Sunflower 5-6

 

Members: 2351

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding was introduced to the Bahamas in 1915. In those early days there were only three companies but they played an important role in the development of girls and young women in the country.  Guiding activities continued from 1915 to 1935, but were then suspended for a time due to a lack of leaders. In 1946, Guiding was restarted in Nassau with the introduction of five units, some attached to churches and some to schools. In the same year the Association was visited by the World Chief Guide, who helped to inspire the girls and their leaders. Over the years Guiding has grown, spreading from Nassau to other islands of the Bahamas, our Family Islands.

Bahrain – Arab Region

Organisation name: The Girl Guides Association of Bahrain

 

Age Groups with names (Local Name and English Language Equivalent

Youth Committee 18 - 23

Senior 16 - 18

Guide 12 - 15

Brownie 7 - 11

 

Members: 2647

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Girl Guides Association of Bahrain was formed in 1970 when Guide
companies were started in three secondary schools. By 1973 additional groups and six Brownie packs had been set up in primary and intermediate schools. The Association, one of the few organizations for girls in Bahrain, continues to expand and benefits from the support of Sheika Noura Isa Al-Kalifa, the daughter of the Emir. All companies and packs in Bahrain are attached to schools.

Bangladesh – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Bangladesh Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 16 - 24

Guide 10 - 16

Yellowbird 6 - 10

 

Numbers: 93323

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Since 1928 Girl Guides have been active in the area which is now Bangladesh. The Bangladesh Girl Guides Association was welcomed as a separate member of WAGGGS in 1973 and is now the country’s largest national organization, offering leadership training to girls and young women.  In addition, Guiding has been incorporated into the student curriculum at the college of physical education and at the institute for primary teachers’ training, and every year more than 80 young women participate in training. Guiding is also an integral part of the secondary school curriculum for girls.

Barbados - Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: The Girl Guide Association of Barbados

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 14-25

Guide 9-16

Brownie Guide 6-11

Blossom 5-7

 

Numbers: 2668

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding started in Barbados in 1918 when Governor O‘Brien assumed duties, bringing with him two daughters who had been enrolled as Guides shortly before leaving England. Lady O‘Brien became the first Island Commissioner and, until her departure in 1925, a room at Government House was used as headquarters.  The permanent headquarters, built on a plot of land acquired in 1949, were opened by the World Chief Guide, Lady Baden Powell on 15 March, 1964.

Belarus – Europe Region

Organisation name: The Association of Belarussian Guides (ABG)

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 15-18

Guide 11-14

Bird 7-10

 

Numbers: 1224

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The initial development of the Movement took place within the framework of the Russian Scout Movement, as Belarus was firstly part of the Russian Empire, then from 1922 part of the Soviet Union. In 1921, a Scout Organization was founded in Kletsk, and at the same time Scouts appeared in Nisvizh and other nearby villages. In 1926, American Methodists helped found the Girl Scout Organization in Vilno. It lasted until 1929, but by the end of the 1920s, Scouting had been banned in the Soviet Union and the Movement’s activities ended, with many leaders and members arrested and imprisoned.  Emergence of democratic principles in the mid-1980s made possible the creation of alternatives to the communist Pioneers organization. Close connections were formed with Guide and Scout organizations of many European countries, when children from areas affected by the Chernobyl accident were invited to summer camps abroad during the Chernobyl Children’s Project undertaken in 1990. Especially close links were developed with Cyprus, and between Minsk and the Guides of Lincolnshire, UK.  In 1992, Cyprus was officially appointed Link country to support the development of Guiding in Belarus, and in June 1993 the 1st Conference of the Association of Belarussian Guides was held in Minsk.

Belgium – Europe Region

Organisation name: The Guide and Scout Movement of Belgium (GSB)

 

The GSB is the umbrella group for the four Guiding organisations in Belgium:

Scouts en Gidsen Vlaanderen (SGV)

Scouts et Guides Pluralistes de Belgique (SGP)

FOS Open Scouting

Guides Catholique de Belgique (GCB)

 

Total Numbers: 56879

 

How Guiding Started:

Guiding in Belgium was officially registered in Brussels in 1915, although there were active groups before that date. In 1919, Belgium became a member of the International Council, and in 1928 a Founder Member of WAGGGS.  Belgian Guiding reflects the nature of the country. There are two linguistic communities – Flemish in the north and French in the south.  In 1979, its three merged Associations, together with the Guides Catholiques de Belgique and the Fédération des Scouts Catholiques de Belgique (five Associations in all) created a new co-ordinating committee to facilitate the exchange of ideas and promote the fundamental principles of Guiding and Scouting, while at the same time respecting the individual characteristics of each Association.  Guiding in Belgium is linked together by The Guides and Scouts Movement of Belgium (Guidisme et Scoutisme en Belgique in French, Gidsen en Scoutsbeweging in Belgie, in Dutch). GSB presents a united image to the public through the press.

 

Organisation Name: Scouts en Gidsen Vlaanderen (SGV)

 

Age Groups with names

Jin (Ranger) 17+

Gids (Guide) 14-17

Jonggids (Junior Guide) 11-14

Kabouter (Brownie) 8-11

Kapoenen (Beaver) 6-8

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

In 1972, VVKM, Flemish-speaking and Catholic, merged with the parallel Scout Association, VVKS, and became the Vlaams Verbond van Katholieke Scouts en Meisjesgidsen (VVKSM). Units are free to merge or to work separately. All teams are merged at district, regional and national levels.

 

Organisation Name: Scouts et Guides Pluralistes de Belgique (SGP)

 

Age Groups with names

Routier / Aînée (Ranger) 18+

Pionnier / Pionnière (Pioneer) 15-18

Scout/Eclaireuse (Guide) 12-15

Louveteau (Cub) 8-12

Castor (Beaver) 5-8

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The origin of this Movement dates back to 1910 when the first group of Scouts on the continent was established in Brussels. In the same year, the organization ‘Boys Scouts of Belgium’ was founded. The year 1964 brought the split into different language regions which in 1966 led to the foundation of the French speaking ‘Scouts et Guides Pluralistes (SPG) and the Dutch-speaking ‘Federatie voor Open Scoutisme (FOS). Both are members of the Boy Scouts and Girl Guides Belgium (BSB/GGB) which forms the umbrella organization of the Pluralist Scouts and Guides Organizations of Belgium.

 

Organisation Name: FOS Open Scouting

 

Age Groups with names

Leiding leader 18+

Stam Clan 18+

Senior Ranger 16-18

Gidsen Guide 14-16

Jonggidsen Junior Guide 11-13

Welpen Cub 8-10

Bever Beaver 5-7

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The origin of this Movement dates back to 1910 when the first group of Scouts on the continent was established in Brussels. In the same year, the organization ‘Boys Scouts of Belgium’ was founded. The year 1964 brought the split into different language regions which in 1966 led to the foundation of the French speaking ‘Scouts et Guides Pluralistes (SPG) and the Dutch-speaking ‘Federatie voor Open Scoutisme (FOS). Both are members of the Boy Scouts and Girl Guides Belgium (BSB/GGB) which forms the umbrella organization of the Pluralist Scouts and Guides Organizations of Belgium.

 

Organisation Name: Guides Catholique de Belgique (GCB)

 

Age Groups with names

Routier (Ranger) 17+

Guide Horizon (Horizon Guide) 15-17

Guide Aventure (Adventure Guide) 11-15

Lutin (Brownie) 7-11

Nuton (Nuton) 5-7

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Association of Guides Catholiques de Belgique (GCB) is the French-speaking Association of Roman Catholic Guiding and is open to girls and boys. Their present goal is “to contribute to the education of youth through the practice and implementation of Baden-Powell’s principles, in accordance with the GCB Charter.”

Belize Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: The Girl Guides Association of Belize

 

Age Groups with names (Local Name and English Language Equivalent

Ranger Guide 14-19

Guide 11-14

Brownie 7-11

 

Members: 532

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding was introduced in British Honduras (now known as Belize) in 1937, when six companies were formed in Belize City under church sponsorship. In the same year, the Association was registered with the Girl Guides Association (UK) as the British Honduras Branch of the Girl Guides Association.

A rally held in Belize City in 1938 attracted many more girls to Guiding. By 1939 Guide groups had been established at Stann Creek with sponsorship from the Methodist, Anglican and Roman Catholic Churches. The first Brownie packs were formed in 1948 in Belize City and the first Ranger unit in 1949.

In 1973, when the country changed its name to Belize, the Association became known as the Belize Branch of the Girl Guides Association. The Association grew steadily, helped in its development by trainers from the United Kingdom and the Caribbean Link. In 1986 The Girl Guides Association (UK) signed a Deed of Transfer, giving the Girl Guides Association of Belize self-government in all areas of work.

Benin – Africa Region

Organisation name: Guides Du Bénin

 

Age Groups with names (Local Name and English Language Equivalent

Guide aînée (Ranger) 16+

Guide (Guide) 11-16

Jeannette (Brownie) 8-11

 

Members: 2306

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Benin, formerly Dahomey, began in 1954 in a girls’ secondary school at Porto Novo. Two years later a Guide camp was held, and in 1956 the 1st Cotonou Guide Company was officially registered. During the following year several other companies were formed, and by 1957 Brownie packs and Ranger units had also been introduced. The Association was officially established by the end of 1960. About the same time, Guide companies began to adopt villages where they carried out service projects with the community. Guiding has now developed in both urban and rural areas.

Bermuda - (Europe Region)

Organisation name: Girlguiding Bermuda

 

Age Groups with names

Rainbow (5+)

Brownie (7+)

Guide (10+)

Senior Section (14-26)

 

Members: 400

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

In 1913, Mary Swan, a US Girl Scout visiting her grandparents, introduced Girl Scouting to Bermuda and formed a Girl Scout troop with fifty members. When she left Bermuda, the troop was closed. Shortly after this, a local headmistress started Girl Guiding and the first Guide unit was registered in January 1919. Brownies followed in 1921.[3]

We have grown to be the largest of the 9 Branch Associations of Girlguiding UK. We sponsor 17 active units across the island, hosting over 400 girls ages 5-20 and now operate under the name of Girlguiding Bermuda.

The girls follow a similar programme to girls in the UK, use the same publications and wear guiding clothing. Although Branch Associations use programme materials and training, we develop our own activities also.

Bolivia – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Asociación De Guías Scouts De Bolivia

 

Age Groups with names

Mayor (Ranger) 15-18

Intermedia (Intermediate) 13-14

Pre Intermedia (Pre-Intermediate) 10-12

Alita (Little Wing) 6-7+

 

Members: 221

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Although the Movement was introduced to Bolivia in 1915, the first contact with WAGGGS was not made until 1954 when the Western Hemisphere Travelling Commissioner visited Bolivia. The Asociación de Muchachas Guías de Bolivia was established in 1958.

Botswana – Africa Region

Organisation name: Botswana Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names (Local Name and English Language Equivalent

Senior 16-21

Girl Guide 11-15

Sunbeam 7-10

 

Members: 9825

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Botswana (then called Bechuanaland Protectorate) began in 1924 after a young girl, returning home to Kanye from boarding school in England, contacted other girls and interested them in the Movement. The Poppy patrol, with six members, was formed and by the end of the year a Brownie six had also started.

In 1928 a company of Girl Wayfarers, an organization for African girls working on similar lines to Guiding, was started by the wife of a missionary living in Kanye. Numbers grew steadily and interest in the Movement spread throughout the country. In 1936 the Girl Wayfarers, by affiliation with WAGGGS, became Wayfarer Guides, and by 1945 there was one Movement for all the girls in Botswana whose members were known as Girl Guides and Sunbeams. The Guide Association (UK), the Girl Guides Association of South Africa and members of the Movement in Belgium gave valuable training assistance to the developing Movement in Botswana.

In 1966 the country became independent and the Guide Association (UK) approved a deed of transfer making the Botswana Girl Guides Association self-governing in all areas of work.

Brazil – Western Hemisphere

Organisation name: Federação de Bandeirantes do Brasil

 

Age Groups with names

Guia (Ranger) 15-18

Bandeirante 2 (Guide) 12-14

Bandeirante 1 (Junior Guide) 9-11

Ciranda (Brownie) 6-8

 

Members: 10789

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Brazil began in Rio de Janeiro in 1919, following a letter from Olave, Lady Baden-Powell, to open the Movement. The Federação celebrates 13 August as Foundation Day, the date on which the first 11 Guides (Bandeirantes) made their Promise in 1919. In 1930, Brazil became the first South American country to become a member of WAGGGS.

British Virgin Islands – (Europe Region)

Organisation name: The British Virgin Islands Girl Guide Association

 

Age Groups with names

Rainbow 5+

Brownie 7+

Guide 10+

Senior Section 14-26

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The British Virgin Islands Girl Guide Association is a Guiding organization in the British Virgin Islands and was founded in 1928. It is one of the nine branch associations of Girlguiding UK. It is represented by Girlguiding UK at World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) level and Girlguiding UK's Chief Guide is also Chief Guide for British Virgin Islands Girlguiding. British Virgin Islands Girlguiding is part of the Caribbean Link for Guiding.

The program is a modified form of Guiding in the United Kingdom, adapted to suit local conditions, with the same promise, and Rainbow, Brownie, Guide and Ranger groups.

Brunei Darussalam – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Girl Guides Association of Brunei

 

Age Groups with names

Brownies 7+

Guides 10+

Senior Section 14+

 

Members: 1677

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Girl Guide Movement started in Brunei Darussalam in 1951 as a branch of the Guide Association (UK), but for the first three years the activity was confined to only the Belait District. In 1954, the first Guide company was formed in the Capital, Brunei Town which is in the Brunei Muara District, and from then on new Guide companies and Brownie packs were formed, and the Movement grew from strength to strength. By 1960 a total of 17 Guide companies and six Brownie packs had been established.

In December 1962, a rebellion broke out in Brunei, and from then on almost all Guiding activities stopped. In 1964, Her Highness Pengiran Anak Puteri (Princess) Noor Ehsani consented to become the State Commissioner, and following a visit by a trainer from the United Kingdom, the Movement began to be active again. In 1966 the Government created the post of Organizing Commissioner in the State Education Department, whose function was to organize Guide companies and Brownie packs in schools, which further helped in promoting Guiding in the country. By 1972, 14 new Guide companies and nine new Brownie packs had been formed.

When the Association's President resigned in 1972, the Association almost ground to a halt. Membership dropped and companies and packs closed down. In September 1983, Her Royal Highness Paduka Seri Pengiran Anak Puteri (Princess) Masna consented to become the President. She instigated new activities and programmes which began to revitalize Guiding. A major campaign for membership was launched which was very successful. By 1986, seven new companies and 13 packs were formed, whilst the others began to be active again.

Brunei Darussalam became independent in 1984, and in 1986 the Guide Association (UK) signed a Deed of Transfer, giving the Girl Guides Association of Brunei Darussalam self-government in all areas of work. In 1990, the Association launched its new uniforms and enrolment badges, and in 1995 new patrol badges were introduced depicting local flowers and fruits. In 2001 the Association celebrated 50 years of Girl Guiding.

Burkina Faso - Africa Region

Organisation name: L’Association Des Guides du Burkina Faso

 

Age Groups with names (Local Name and English Language Equivalent

Jeannettes 7-11

Guides 12- 18

 

Members: 16333

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Burkina Faso, formerly known as Upper Volta, began in 1955, but for almost 15 years it was confined to towns, where it existed mostly in schools. In 1971 Guiding started to become established in rural areas, and the Association, l’Association des Guides de Haute-Volta, was organized into provinces, districts and companies. In 1984 the Association changed its name to the Association des Guides du Burkina Faso.

Burundi – Africa Region

Organisation name: Association Des Guides du Burundi

 

Age Groups with names

Eclaireuse (Guide aînée) Ranger 16+

Guide Guide (Senior) 13-16

Guide Guide (Junior) 12-15

Bergeronnette Wagtail 7-11

 

Members: 12929

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Burundi was started in 1954-55 by Belgian social workers as part of the Catholic Guides of Belgian Congo, Rwanda-Urundi. After the country’s independence in 1962, an Association was formed which has since grown steadily.

Cambodia – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Girl Guides Association of Cambodia

 

Age Groups with names

Dragonfly (Kantumruy) 7 -10 years

Guide ( Wadanak ) 11 -14

Ranger ( Kayarith ) 15 -18

 

Members: 4551

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girl Guiding was introduced to Cambodia before 1953, during the French Protectorate, but was banned during the Independence, Khymer Republic and Vietnamese Occupation. After the Paris Peace Agreement in 1991, the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts, through former Guides from Europe and the Asia Pacific Region, proposed to revive the Movement. In 1996, Mrs. Leang Meng Ho, the Director of the Cambodian Institute of Human Rights (and a former Cambodian Girl Guide of France) took the lead and re-initiated the Movement with a group of 16 university students. With the assistance of a French volunteer, the Development Executive for the Asia Pacific Region and trainers from the Philippines and Thailand, these founders were able to gain skills in leadership and management of troops. In 1998 the first National Executive Committee was formed, with the responsibility to maintain the Fundamental Principles of the Girl Guiding Movement, furthering the advancement of Guiding in the country and running the Association according to its Constitution.

In 1999, Her Majesty Queen Norodom Monineat Sihanouk of Cambodia became Patron of the GGAC.

Since 1991, GGAC members have participated in international camps and trainings and attended the Asia Pacific Regional and the 31st World Conference in Manila where they became Associate Members of WAGGGS.

Cameroon – Africa Region

Organisation name: Association des Guides du Cameroun

 

Members: 5350

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding began in West Cameroon in 1943 with the formation of a Girl Guide company in Victoria. The Movement spread to other areas of the country and by 1947 Brownie packs had been formed. However, until the country’s independence in 1961, Guiding activities were carried out in conjunction with the Nigerian Girl Guides Association. The West Cameroon Girl Guides Association was subsequently formed as an independent association.

Guiding in East Cameroon was officially established in 1963 when Les Guides du Cameroun was formed, although in some areas of the region Guiding activities had already been taking place for two years.

A Cameroon National Guide Council was formed in 1970, followed a year later by the creation of the Cameroon Union of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts consisting of the West Cameroon Girl Guides Association and Les Guides du Cameroun.

After the creation of the United Republic of Cameroon, which replaced the Federal Republic, and with the expansion of Guiding in the country, in 1974 it was decided to dissolve the Union and to establish in its place a single Guide association, the Cameroon Girl Guides Association/Association des Guides du Cameroun.

The association became Full Member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts during the 35th World Conference that took place in Hong Kong in July 2014

Canada – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Girl Guides of Canada – Guides du Canada

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 15-17

Pathfinder 12-15

Guide 9-12

Brownie 7-9

Spark 5-6

 

Guides franco-canadiennes

Aînée 17

Kamsok 14-16

Guide 11-13

Jeannette 8-10

Etincelle 6-7

Members: 92000

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Canadian Guide units were established in Ontario in 1910; in 1911 the first Guide camps were held, and by 1912 Guiding had spread across Canada. In 1917 the Canadian Council of Girl Guides was incorporated by an Act of Parliament. In 1961 the organization became known as Girl Guides of Canada-Guides du Canada.

Throughout its history, Girl Guides of Canada has prepared girls to meet the challenges that they face in their lives head on. Whether it was girls learning to bandage wounds during the First World War or girls today working on their anti-bullying badge, Canadian Guiding is continually evolving to reflect the needs and interests of contemporary girls and women.

In the last 100 years, 7 million Canadian girls and women have been connected to Guiding. Events marking the 100th anniversary of Guiding in Canada took place across the country throughout 2010.

Cayman Islands - (Europe Region)

Organisation name: Girlguiding Cayman Islands

 

Age Groups with names

Rainbows 5+

Brownies 7+

Guides 10+

Senior Section 14+

 

Members: 200

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girlguiding Cayman Islands (formerly The Cayman Islands Girl Guide Association) is a Guiding organization in the Cayman Islands. It is one of the nine branch associations of Girlguiding UK. It is represented by Girlguiding UK at World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) level and Girlguiding UK's Chief Guide is also Chief Guide for Cayman Islands Girlguiding. Cayman Islands Girlguiding is part of the Caribbean Link for Guiding.

The program is a modified form of Guiding in the United Kingdom, adapted to suit local conditions, with the same promise, and Rainbow, Brownie, Guide and Ranger groups.

Central African Republic – Africa Region

Organisation name: Association Nationale des Guides de Centrafrique

 

Age Groups with names (Local Name and English Language Equivalent

Guide aînée (Ranger) 17+

Guide (Guide) 14-17

Jeannette (Brownie) 8-13

 

Members: 7125

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in the Central African Republic began in 1952, and by the following year both Guide companies and Brownie packs had been established in the country. In 1955 a combined Guide and Brownie camp was organized, and during the next two years Guiding spread to many rural areas.

In 1959, Les Guides Centrafricaines was formally registered, and by 1963 membership in the Association had risen to 1,600, and the first African National Commissioner was elected. In 1979, the Association changed its name to the Association des Guides et Eclaireuses Centrafricaines.

For several years no news was heard of Guiding in the Central African Republic, but in 1991 members combined their efforts to set up a new national team and to bring new life to the Movement. The Federation originally had two components but only the Association des Guides Catholiques Centrafricaines is functioning at the time of writing.

Chad – Africa Region

Organisation name: Association des Guides du Tchad

 

Age Groups with names

Butterfly: 6 – 7

Brownie: 8-11

Guide: 12-14

Senior Guide: 15 – 17

 

Members: 7112

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding was introduced in Chad in 1957 by Sisters of the Holy Cross coming from Jerusalem. The Movement grew throughout the south of the country due to the spread of Christianity. Today, the Movement has reached the capital, N'Djamena and there are units in six regions in the south: Ndjamèna, Doba, Moundou, Goré, Laï and Sarh.

Chile – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Asociación De Guías Y Scouts De Chile

 

Age Groups with names (Local Name and English Language Equivalent

Caminante (Walker) 18-20

Pionera (Pioneer) 15-17

Guía (Guide) 11-15

Golondrina (Swallow) 8-11

 

Members: 19337

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding began in Chile in 1913 when a Girl Guide company was started in Rancagua and registered with the Scout Association of Chile. Brownie, Guide and Ranger companies were set up throughout the country under the auspices of the Scout Association, and activities were mostly carried out in schools with teachers acting as leaders.

In 1953 the Guides formed a separate Association, the Asociación de Guías de Chile, and in 1960 it was officially recognized as a national institution of Chile. In the mid-1960s a female section developed within the Federación de Scouts Católicos, and following an agreement for joint action in 1971, these girls were integrated into the Asociación de Guías de Chile in 1974.

In 1974 the Scouts Association of Chile was formed as a result of the merger of Scout Associations in Chile. This Association had a considerable number of girls in its ranks, and by 1977 members of the Asociación de Guías de Chile and the female Scout section were working together on events and courses. Following a study carried out by representatives from both Associations, the Guide and Scout Movements formed a Joint Organization, the Asociación de Guías y Scouts de Chile. As a merged Association, Guías y Scouts de Chile has become one of the most important and biggest youth organizations of the country.

Being a member of WAGGGS and WOSM, the Association has strengthened its educational proposal and gained a position in the context of Latin/American Guiding and Scouting, being recognized for its interest in serving youth and for its permanent renewal.

Colombia – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Asociación De Guías Scouts De Colombia

 

Age Groups with names:

Guía Mayor (Ranger) 15-18

Carabela Intermediate (Guide) 12-15

Guía Menor (Junior Guide) 9-12

Hadita (Fairy) 6-9

 

Members: 291

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding began in Colombia in 1936, but it was not until 1948 that the National Executive Council was formed. The Association was recognized by the government in 1954 and its headquarters were set up in Bogotá.

Congo – Africa Region

Organisation name: Association des Scouts et Guides du Congo

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 17-25

Guide 12-17

Brownie 8-12

 

Members: 5770

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Scouting was introduced to Congo in 1927 by a French missionary of the Spiritains Fathers, a Catholic priest, called Father Le Baye. Between 1927 and 1960, as in all French-speaking African countries, Guiding evolved as an extension of Les Guides de France.

When the country became independent in 1960, l’Association des Guides du Congo was created, led by Congolese who had been trained by Les Guides de France.

As the Republic of Congo had opted for a Marxist/Leninist political system, in 1963 the Government banned Scout and Guide Movements in the country, creating one youth movement called ‘Les Pionniers et Pionnières de la Révolution’ (Pioneers of the Revolution).

In 1991, with the arrival of democracy, Guiding was relaunched after a 27-year break. Through the impetus given by former Scouts, Guides, Eclaireuses and Eclaireurs leaders, the former Catholic Scout and Guide leaders formed a joint organization, officially recognized in 1992.

WAGGGS, being concerned with the development of Girl Guiding in the country, sent several representatives to assist in the relaunching of the Movement, to organize a formal structure and train leaders, and to develop its Constitution and Bye-laws.

Les Guides du Congo forms a joint organization with Les Scouts du Congo. The General Assembly, the highest body of the Association, meets every three years, and is chaired by the President. The National Council, which meets once a year, is the executive body of the General Assembly and is also chaired by the President.

Democratic Republic of Congo – Africa Region

Organisation name: Les Guides De La République Démocratique Du Congo

 

Age Groups with names

Les Bengalis (5 to 11 years),
Les Guides (12 to 17 years)
Les Ainees (Rangers) (over 17 years old)

 

Members: 13958

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding was introduced to DRC by Catholic and Protestant Missionaries as early as 1928.

The first official unit was opened in Elisabethville in 1937 and Guiding quickly spread to other towns and rural areas. In 1950, Lady Baden-Powell visited DRC and met Guides and Leaders in Leopoldville. In 1963, Leslie Whateley, the former Director, World Bureau, visited DRC to assist the country in its preparation for Membership of the World Association. L’ Association des Guides du Zaire was accepted into Associate Membership at the 21st World Conference held in June 1972. Five months after acceptance into Membership, the then government banned all youth organizations and created one youth movement under the government. Guiding was restarted in 1991, 23 years after suppression. Between 1992 and 2007 the Association has been rebuilding itself with support from the Africa Region. Today Guiding can be found in schools, cultural meeting places, parishes, other religious groupings and structures where there are youth activities. The activities offered through Guiding give girls and young women an opportunity for self-development as well as responding to the needs of their immediate communities.

GRDC has made tremendous efforts in relaunching Guiding in the country. Today there is Guiding in nine of 11 provinces in DRC, two more provinces than in 2005. Members are recruited through schools, churches, the Salvation Army and Kibanguistes. Some girls are Muslims recruited through community-based Guiding. Former Guides were recruited to assist in publicizing and supporting the Guide Movement (in Kasai Occidental and Lukala). The total number of 7,784 (census 2006-2007) is still a low figure compared to the total female youth in DRC, but this number shows a steady increase for the last two years. The bigger challenge for the Association is to ensure that there are both financial and human resources to support the growth.

Cook Islands – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: The Girl Guides Association Cook Islands

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 15-20

Guide 11-15

Brownie 7-11

Pepe 3-6

 

Members: 700

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

1928 marked the beginning of Guiding in the Cook Islands. The first Guide company opened in the capital, Avarua, on the island of Rarotonga, and the Islands were registered as a province of the Girl Guides Association New Zealand (Inc). Ranger Patrols were set up in 1935 and the first Brownie pack was registered in 1937.

The first outer island company was started in Aitutaki in 1948. The 1950s were an era of growth with the foundation of new companies both on Rarotonga and the outer islands. The Cook Islands became a Branch Association of the Girl Guides Association (New Zealand), membership increased, and leaders attended overseas training and other events. UNESCO funded a full-time trainer from 1956 to 1958. With good administration and a more active programme, Guiding became fully accepted by the community and supported by the churches.

In 1986 the Association fulfilled a long-standing ambition by obtaining its own headquarters. Membership continued to grow and in 1992 a Deed of Transfer was signed making the Branch Association of the Cook Islands independent of the Girl Guides Association New Zealand (Inc).

The association became Full Member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts during the 35th World Conference that took place in Hong Kong in July 2014.

Costa Rica – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Asociación De Guías Y Scouts De Costa Rica

 

Age Groups with names

Manada - 7 - 10

Tropa 11 - 14

Wak Tsuri 15 - 17

 

Members: 5414

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Costa Rica started in 1922 when a Guide company was opened in the Girls’ Secondary School of San José. By 1944 Guiding had spread to other areas of the country and the Asociación de Guías de Costa Rica was established. After a period of decline, fresh impetus was given to the Association in 1965 when a member of the Western Hemisphere Committee visited the country to advise the National Committee. This was followed by a visit from a WAGGGS Travelling
Commissioner.

In 1974 talks began with the Boy Scout Association of Costa Rica on a possible merger. A Liaison Committee was set up with representatives from the two National Committees to study possible ways of work and to prepare a draft Constitution and Regulations. After a series of meetings an agreement was drawn up and accepted by both Associations. By 1977 all plans for the merger were implemented and the administrative structure was in operation.

Cyprus – Europe Region

Organisation name: Girl Guides Association of Cyprus (GGCA)

 

Age Groups with names

Senior Guide/Prospective Leader 16-18

Sea/Air/Forest Guide 13-15

Guide 10-12

Butterfly 7-9

Chrysalid 5-6

 

Members: 1754

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Although Lone Guides are known to have existed on the island since 1912, written records of Guide companies functioning as a branch of the UK Guides Association appear from 1930. In 1960 the Cyprus Republic was proclaimed and the Girl Guides Association of Cyprus was officially established. The Association admits to membership those persons who voluntarily enrol, irrespective of creed, colour, race or nationality, and without any distinction whatsoever, provided they adopt the principles of the Association. In 1974 the Association was awarded the Walter Donald Ross Certificate of Merit for outstanding service rendered to the refugees of Cyprus.

In 1989 the Association hosted the 6th European Scouts and Guides Conference, in co-operation with the Cyprus Scouts Association.

During the last decade, rapid social and other changes occurred in Cyprus. The Girl Guides Association of Cyprus, taking into serious consideration the successive changes and the role it has to play in the development of girls and young women in Cyprus, created a committee which consists of members of the Association holding key positions. These members co-operate with professionals and other experts when needed. They study the situation in depth and send in their recommendations regarding the formation of the programme so that it applies to the needs of the girls and young women of today.

Czech Republic – Europe Region

Organisation name: Junák - svaz skautu a skautek CR (JUNAK)

 

Members: 19143

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding started in Bohemia, a part of the Austrian Empire, in 1915 as a section of the union Junák-Český skaut. Shortly after the country proclaimed its independence in 1918, the Czecho-Slovak Boy Scout Association (which included Guides) was established. Czechoslovakia’s Association was a founder member of WAGGGS. In 1934 the name was changed to the Czechoslovak Boy and Girl Scouts Association, with independent executive committees created for Scouts and Guides.

In 1939 all youth organizations were required to become members of the official political organization and were forbidden to use the name skaut (Scout); only the Czech name Junák was allowed. The girls continued to use the name skautky (Girl Scouts), but they were not allowed to wear the international Trefoil. Scouting and Guiding continued for a short time, but were prohibited from holding large gatherings. They were forced to stop their activities in 1940 when they were officially banned by the Nazi regime and all property was seized for the use of the Nazi Youth Organization.

In 1945, when the country was liberated, Guiding and Scouting re-emerged and the Association was re-established. By the end of the year membership had reached nearly 38,000. Another major setback occurred in 1950 when Guiding and Scouting were once again banned and all possessions were confiscated by the Communist Youth Movement.

In 1968 Guiding and Scouting officially resumed, but international contacts were not re-established because the organization was a part of the Federation of Children and Youth Organizations, supported and governed by the state. In 1970, for the third time in its history, the Movement was banned and its possessions were taken over by the Communist Youth Organization.

In 1989 the situation in Czechoslovakia changed once again. With the establishment of democracy, the National Association of Scouts and Guides was recognized. Membership rose quickly despite practical difficulties faced by the organization in finding meeting places and resources.

In 1990 the Association was welcomed back as an Associate Member, but in 1993 the country split, becoming the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic. Later that year WAGGGS recognized the separate Associations for the newly formed Republics. In 1996, the Association was given Full Membership in WAGGGS.

Denmark – Europe Region

Organisation name: Pigespejdernes Fællesråd Danmark (PFD)

 

Members: 17403

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Denmark began in 1910 when some girls joined a Boy Scout group. Within a few years the girls had their own organization, Det Danske Pigespejderkorps (The Danish Guide Association), and in 1919 the KFUK-Spejderne i Danmark (The YWCA Girl Guides) was formed. These two associations joined in 1928 to form the National Organization, Pigespejdernes Fællesråd Danmark (The Joint Committee of Girl Guides in Denmark) when Denmark became a Founder Member of WAGGGS.

In 1976 the structure of the Joint Committee was changed to include Danske Baptisters Spejderkorps (The Danish Baptist Guide and Scout Association) as a separate association (they had previously been members through KFUK-Spejderne i Danmark). HRH Princess Benedikte is the President of the Joint Committee.

Pigespejdernes Fællesråd Danmark presents a united image to the public by issuing press releases for special events. The Joint Committee meets periodically with the Danish Scout Council and holds occasional weekend meetings for members of international committees in Denmark.

 

Organisation name: De grønne pigespejdere (GGG)

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger Ranger Guide 17+

Seniorspejder Senior Guide 14-16

Spejder Guide 10-14

Grønsmutte Brownie 7-10

Spire Sprout 5-7

 

Members: 8300

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The YMCA Girl Guides in Denmark is open only to girls. HRH Princess Benedikte is the Patron of the Association. Metodist Kirkens Spejdere i Danmark (The Guides and Scouts of the Methodist Church in Denmark) and Frelsens Haers Pigespejdere (The Salvation Army Girl Guides) form part of the national organization through the YMCA Girl Guides in Denmark. In 2002, membership of the Association stood at nearly 8,300.

 

 

Organisation name: Kalaallit Nunaanni Spejderit Kattufiat Grønlands Spejderkorps

 

Age Groups with names

Seniorspejdere (Ranger) 15+

Spejdere (Guide) 10-15

Juniorspejdere (Junior Guide) 7-10

Members: 2000

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Greenland is carried out through the Kalaallit Nanaanni Spejderit Kattufiat - Grønlands Spejderkorps, and this Association, open to girls and boys, has international recognition through the national organization. Total membership in 1985 was approximately 2,000.

Organisation name: Danske Baptisters Spejderkorps (DBS)

Age Groups with names

Ranger RS spejder (Guide/Scout Group) 16+

Gruppespejder (Guide/Scout Troop) 13-16

Tropspejder (Guide/Scout Pack) 10-13

Flokspejder (Guide/Scout Hock) 7-10

Klyngespejder (Guide/Scout) 5-7

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

This is a religious association, where all local groups can only exist in close co-operation with a local Baptist church.

It is not necessary to be a Baptist, to be a member of the Association.

Organisation name: Danske Baptisters Spejderkorps (DBS)

 

Age Groups with names

Seniorspejder (Rangers) 16 - 23

Spejder (Guides and Scouts) 12 - 16

Juniorspejder (Junior Guides and Scouts) 10 - 12

Minispejder (Mini Guides and Scouts) 8-10

Mikrospejder (Micro Guides and Scouts) 6 - 8

 

Members: 30600

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Danish Guide and Scout Association is an Association based on the fundamental principles of Guiding and Scouting, and is open to everybody irrespective of sex, race, language, religious and political observation. The aim of the Association is to develop children and young people to become watchful, independent beings, who, to the best of their ability, are willing to take on a humane and sisterly responsibility in the Danish and the international society.

DDS was formed in January 1973, when Det Danske Pigespejderkorps (DDP-Guides) merged with Det Danske Spejderkorps (DDS-Scouts). Her Royal Highness The Princess Benedikte is patron of the Association. The Association stood at approximately 30,600 members, of whom 14,690 were girls and women (2001). The members are divided into 525 groups located all over the country. Co-education is carried out in almost all groups, with girls and boys in the same age group in mixed or single sex patrols.

Dominica – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: The Girl Guides Association of Dominica

 

Members: 962

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

In 1928 a Guider from neighbouring Barbados visited Dominica and persuaded her friend, who was resident in Dominica, to work towards the establishment of Guiding there.

In 1930 the first Dominica Girl Guide company was inaugurated, the first Brownie pack soon followed in 1931, and two Ranger companies were started in 1933.

Because of the effects of war, there was little Guiding activity during the years 1940 to 1945, but the programme soon resumed in 1946. After a visit by the World Chief Guide and trainers from the United Kingdom in 1951, new enthusiasm developed and Guiding became firmly established in Dominica. The Association functioned as a Branch Association of the Guide Association (UK) until 1986 when it became self-governing.

In 1979 the Association celebrated its Golden Jubilee but in August of the same year, Hurricane David struck the island and caused a major disruption to Guiding, due to large-scale emigration and a preoccupation with economic recovery and survival. By 1981, however, Guiding had resumed its normal activities and continued to grow steadily.

Over the past three years the Association has experienced a drop in membership. Most of the teenagers moved to the Scouts Movement (which is now accepting females) and other social groups. A Caribbean programme is being finalized to make the Movement more attractive to the Ranger age group. Locally a great deal of work has been put into developing a training scheme which will help the development of Guiding in Dominica.

Dominican Republic - Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Asociación De Guías Scouts Dominicanas Inc.

 

Age Groups with names

Guía Mayor (Senior Guide) 15-18

Guía Intermediate (Intermedia Guide) 10-14

Golondrina (Swallow) 6-9

 

Members: 348

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first company was opened in the Dominican Republic in San Pedro de Macoris in 1961 with the help of representatives from the WAGGGS Western Hemisphere Committee and by April that year Guiding had spread to Santo Domingo. By 1964 the Association had three branches, with the formation of a group of Senior Guides to complement the existing Brownies and Guides.

The Association’s National Headquarters were opened in Santiago in 1976, and by 1980 Guiding had spread to the whole country, and companies and packs were found in all provinces. In 1988 the National Committee launched an expansion programme with the intention of increasing its membership and improving the quality of Guiding.

Ecuador – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Asociación Nacional De Guías Scouts Del Ecuador

 

Age Groups with names

Guía Mayor (Ranger) 17-19

Cadete (Cadet) 14-16

Junior (Junior) 11-13

Alita (Little Wing) 7-10

 

Members: 124

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Movement started in Ecuador in 1919 when several companies were formed in the city of Guayaquil, but it was not until 1952 that an Association was established with the help of a WAGGGS’ Travelling Commissioner for the Western Hemisphere. Support from the Western Hemisphere Region helped the Association to develop, and it has since extended from the tropical coastal cities to the mountain regions in the interior of the country. The headquarters for the Association were completed with the assistance of four National Associations who contributed through WAGGGS’ Mutual Aid Scheme, and were opened by the Chairman of the Western Hemisphere Committee.

Egypt – Arab Region

Organisation name: Gamiet Morshidat Gomhoriet Misr al Arabiah

 

Age Groups with names

Gawalat (Ranger) 16+

Morshidat (Guide) 12-15

Zahrat (Brownie) 6-11

Baraem (Rainbow) 5-7

 

Members: 39995

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Egypt began around 1918 and was introduced to schools in 1925 followed by the formation of the Egyptian Girl Guides Association in 1929. Since then Guiding has expanded into factories and community clubs.

El Salvador – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Asociación De Muchachas Guías Scouts de El Salvador

 

Age Groups with names

Guía Mayor (Senior Guide) 15-18

Intermedia (Guide) 11-15

Alita (Little Wing) 6-11

Abejita (Pre-Brownie) 4-6

 

Members: 499

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding began in El Salvador when a small group of Guides was established at the Bethany Institute of Santa Tecla. The Asociación de Muchachas Guías de El Salvador was founded in 1944 and was officially recognized in 1949.

After a period of decline, a fresh impetus was given to the Association in 1955 when WAGGGS’ travelling commissioner for the Western Hemisphere formed an executive committee, and the Guide programme became more educational and geared towards the interests of the girl.

El Salvador has participated in all Central American Guide Leaders‘ Gatherings since Guiding began, and it has been the venue of two of them.

In recognition of the Association’s work with young people, the Ministry of Education has, since 1997, been formally awarding technical and financial support for the Association’s work in education centres in the training of Girl Guide/Girl Scout Leaders.

This year a public relations campaign was carried out in five areas (San Salvador, Santa Ana, La Paz, Chalatenango and La Libertad). As a result, the first school camp was held with the participation of 350 girls of school age.

In 1998 Guiding continued to expand with the aim of strengthening existing groups in schools. Ethical, civil and democratic values are now included in the training, and in the school camp programme.

The Association is planning to expand into seven more areas of the country and aims to cover the first three levels of primary education. It is hoped to offer training to teachers, young adults and to children in various educational centres. Leadership skills and self-esteem will be taught in order to offer a cycle of training for leaders. So far, training has been provided to 1,800 people, including teachers, adults and children, and 260 have already made their Promise.

Estonia – Europe Region

Organisation name: Estonian Guide Association (EGL)

 

Age Groups with names

Rover 16-26

Guide 12-15

Brownie 7-11

 

Members: 639

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girl Guiding reached Estonia in 1919 when the first Guide unit was formed in Tallinn. As elsewhere, the forerunner of Estonian Guiding was the Scout Movement, and the first Guide units came into being as part of Scout units. The first independent district was formed in Tallinn, in March 1920. The next year, independent districts were formed in Tartu and Valga.

The foundation of the national organization was laid by forming the Headquarters of the Estonian Girl Guide Association in 1924. At the first Estonian Girl Guide Congress in 1926, work started on standardizing the Guide uniforms, Guide Promise badge and the requirements for the various tests.

The international relations of the organization began as early as 1922. The Estonian Girl Guide Association became a member of the International Council in 1922, and in 1928 was accepted as a founder member of the newly formed WAGGGS.

At the end of the 1920s, Estonian Guiding had overcome the early difficulties, and the development of the organization was stabilized. The founding of a parallel girls’ organization (Home Daughters-Kodutütred) as a youth movement of the Estonian Women’s Defence League Auxiliary Corps at the beginning of the 1930s brought problems to the Guide Movement. Soon, the rivalry which had developed between the two organizations had a positive effect on the Guide programme.

The attempts to unite all Scout/Guide organizations by a law of organizing youth from 1936 onwards had no effect on these girls’ organizations. Guides and Home Daughters worked side by side, until all youth organizations were closed by the Soviet authorities for opposing them in 1940. At that time there were 2,500 members in the Estonian Girl Guide Association. After its official liquidation, some groups continued their work underground during the Soviet, and also German, occupation until 1944.

The political situation in Estonia was very complicated in 1944. Many of the people decided to leave their homes and flee to Sweden or Germany, with the hope of returning. Estonian Guiding and Scouting was built up again in camps in Sweden and Germany, and then spread all over the world. Wherever any Guide leader arrived, there soon arose an Estonian Guide unit. The first units were formed in Sweden in 1944, in Canada and the USA in 1949, in Australia in 1950, and in Argentina in 1951. In Germany, the organization was restored in 1953, and in Brazil an Estonian Guide unit was formed in 1968. A central organization, Estonian Girl Guides in Exile, was established in 1949. Nowadays the Estonian Guides in Exile are working in Canada, Sweden and the USA.

Restoration of Guiding in Estonia began in 1988. Troops and groups formed began activities in different locations across the country. Two separate Guide organizations were formed in 1989 – the historically based Eesti Gaidide Malev and the newly formed Eesti Gaidide Ühendus – and the first national events were held in 1989/90. In 1992 these two girls’ organizations formed a federation in order to facilitate membership of WAGGGS. That membership was reinstated in 1993 and in the Congress of 1999 the two separate organizations joined to form a single, strong, unified Estonian Guide Organization called Estonian Guides Association.

Falkland Islands (Europe Region)

Organisation name: Girlguiding Falkland Islands

 

Age Groups with names

Rainbows (5+)

Brownies (7+)

Guides (10+)

Senior Section (14+)

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girlguiding Falkland Islands (formerly The Falkland Islands Girl Guide Association) is a Guiding organization in the Falkland Islands. It is one of the nine branch associations of Girlguiding UK. It is represented by Girlguiding UK at World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) level and Girlguiding UK's Chief Guide is also Chief Guide for Falkland Islands Girlguiding.

The program is a modified form of Guiding in the United Kingdom, adapted to suit local conditions, with the same promise, and Rainbow, Brownie, Guide and Senior Guide groups.

Faroe Islands – Europe Region

Organisation name: Føroya Skótaráð

 

Age Groups with names (Local Name and English Language Equivalent

Cub Scouts – ages 7 to 11

Scouts – ages 11 to 16

Venture Scouts – ages 16 to 18

Rover Scouts – ages 18 and older

 

Members: 1400

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

In the Faroe Islands, there are four Scout and Guiding associations forming the Føroya Skótaráð (Faroese Scout Council). They work under the same basic rules, but they do have their own specialties.

The council is a member of Fællesrådet for Danmarks Drengespejdere and has observer status with Pigespejdernes Fællesråd Danmark, the Danish Guide association.

 

Føroya Skótasamband

Also known as The Yellow Scouts, the organization was founded in 1926. There are five Scout groups in the country. The groups are not connected to religious organizations, and have both girls and boys as members. The uniform is a khaki shirt. There are just under 300 members.

 

Skótalið Frelsunarhersins

The Salvation Army Scouts or FH-Scouts were founded in 1939. There is only one small group in the country. The group, connected to the Salvation Army, has boy and girl members. The uniform is a gray shirt. In 1994, there were 24 members throughout the country.

 

Føroya KFUK Skótar

The Faroese YWCA Scouts, the local Girl Scouts, were founded in 1928. There are six groups in the country, connected to the Lutheran Church. In most places, there are only female members. The uniform is a green shirt. In 1994, there were 269 members.

 

KFUM Skótarnir I Føroyum

The Faroese YMCA Scouts were founded in 1939. There are 7 groups in the country, and the organization is also connected to the Lutheran Church. The uniform is a green shirt and members are both male and female. In 1994, there were 14 groups and 998 members in the country.

Federated States of Micronesia

 

See USA

Fiji – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Fiji Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Young Leaders 23-30

Ranger 17-22

Guide 11-16

Brownie Guide 7-10

 

Members: 5531

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Guide company was started in Levuka in 1924 by a Methodist missionary. In 1926 this group of Guides participated in a parade in Suva in honour of a royal visit, and as a result of this public appearance, the first Toorak Company was formed in Suva. By 1928 more companies and a Brownie pack had been established in Suva, and all companies had been registered with the Guide Association (UK). In September 1930 the Girl Guides Association of Fiji was formed.

In 1942 the activities of the growing organization were suspended when Fiji became a military base and schools were used for military purposes. At the end of the Second World War, Guiding was re-established.

Over the years, trainers and other experienced personnel from the Guide Association (UK) have visited Fiji to assist the Association in the development of its programme, and the implementation of its training strategy.

In 1980 the Guide Association (UK) signed a Deed of Transfer giving the Fiji Girl Guides Association self-government in all areas of work.

Finland – Europe Region

Organisation name: Suomen Partiolaiset – Finlands Scouter ry

 

Age Groups with names

Vaeltaja (Finnish) or Rover (Swedish): (Ranger) 15-20

Partiolainen (Finnish) or Flickscout (Swedish): (Guide) 10-14

Sudenpentu (Finnish) or Vargunge (Swedish): (Brownie) 7-10

 

Members: 23450

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Girl Guide company in Finland was formed in 1910, but the years that followed saw great political upheaval, resulting in a ban on Girl Guiding. The Movement was officially revived in 1917, and it has expanded steadily and gained strength ever since. The first Brownie pack was started in 1925, and the first Ranger company in 1930. In 1928 three Finnish Associations, Suomalainen Partiotyttöliitto, Finlands Svenska Scoutförbund and Suomen Vapaa Partioryhmä, were recognized together as a Founder Member of WAGGGS.

Interest in the Movement grew fast, and before long there were five active Girl Guide Associations in Finland. In 1934 Girl Guiding was introduced for girls with special needs. The Second World War created the need for closer co-operation, and in 1943 a single Association, the Union of Finnish Girl Guides, was established.

The Union of Finnish Girl Guides worked in co-operation with the Scout Union of Finland, and in 1972 the merged organization, Suomen Partiolaiset - Finlands Scouter ry (The Guides and Scouts of Finland) was formed. As a result of this, administration for national events and training is a combined undertaking, and all the Guide and Scout districts work together. At local level many companies still work separately. The GSF has 75,000 members (Guides and Scouts) in all.

Lately an internal migration in Finland has created a need to found new local groups in areas where there are high numbers of young people. The More Groups: More Members project started in 2002. Another challenge GSF is facing is welcoming young people with a immigrant background into the Movement and assuring that their needs are met. During 2001, a study was undertaken to discover the best possible ways to involve all young people into Guiding.

France – Europe Region

Organisation name: Fédération Du Scoutisme Français (FSF)

 

Members: 41335

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girl Guiding/Girl Scouting in France is carried out under the auspices of Scoutisme Féminin Français, composed of the female members of five Associations. Each Association has units throughout France, and is structured on a local level by department and by region. Scoutisme Féminin Français has a commission composed of the International Commissioners from the five Associations. The commission meets regularly to discuss general issues affecting Girl Guiding/Girl Scouting in France, to further good relations by exchanging ideas on common problems, and to promote international understanding. Scoutisme Féminin Français is headed in rotation by one of the International Commissioners for a period of three years.

 

Organisation name: Scouts et Guides de France (GDF)

 

Age Groups with names

Jeunes en marche (Youth on the Move) 17-20

Caravelle (Caravelle Guide) 15-16

Guide (Guide) 11-14

Jeanette (Brownie) 8-11

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Les Guides de France is a single-sex Association. It provides a Roman Catholic educational base for the Guide programme.

The Association carries out activities designed for each age group and introduced a junior section, Les Farandoles, in 1982, catering for girls aged six to eight years, on an experimental basis. Handicapped units address the particular problems faced by girls with special needs and a special publication is produced, Pour toi, le journal de Dominique, which aims to help adolescents with learning disabilities through the use of drawings. In 1995, the Association had 3,000 girls, leaders and officers to prepare together the 1995-1998 triennium on the theme ‘Actors of hope’.

 

Organisation name: Scouts Musulmans de France (SMF)

 

Age Groups with names

‘circle’ 8-12: the Travellers "to discover nature and have fun together".

‘troop’ 11-15: " to be daring in our endeavours, to live an adventure"

‘post’ 14 - 18: The Pioneers " to undertake, to lead one's way in life"

‘relay’ 17- 21: The Companions " I am a companion to men. Humanity is one, and I am a member. By being virtuous, I serve God. Humble and faithful, I spread peace.

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

This Association is firmly based on spiritual values and open to young people of any belief. It has very concrete aims and helps young people with an immigrant background towards building an identity within French society and towards occupational integration which is essential to full integration as a citizen. Their Mission is to contribute to the education of boys and girls for a more brotherly, more tolerant and more humane world, helping boys and girls to build a system of values based on spiritual, social and personal principles expressed in the Scout Law and Promise.

As a Moslem Movement, they belong to UISM (Moslem Scouts International Union), nurtured on Islam’s founding principles: the Koran, the Sunna as well as Moslem traditions. However, the Association is also a French Youth Movement, and subscribes to republican values and laws, respecting democracy and human rights.

 

Organisation name: Les Eclaireuses et Eclaireurs Israelites de France (EEIF)

 

Age Groups with names

Perspective (Perspective Girl Scout) 15-17

Eclaireuse (Girl Scout) 12-15

Bétissette (Brownie) 8-11

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

L’Association des Eclaireuses et Eclaireurs Israélites de France, operative since 1923, is a co-educational Association. It aims to train young Jews to be aware of both their Judaism and their role in the community. It offers them a dynamic Judaic programme which incorporates participation in games, outdoor activities, artistic and musical expression, sport, and the learning of spiritual values.

The Association publishes several periodicals: Bulletin EEIF. Yossi and EIF.

 

Organisation name: Les Eclaireuses et Eclaireurs de France (EEDF)

 

Age Groups with names

Aînés (Ranger) 15-19

Eclaireuses / Eclaireurs (Girl Scout) 11-15

Louveteau (Cub Scout) 8-11

Lutin 6-8

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Les Eclaireuses et Eclaireurs de France is a non-denominational co-educational Association which strives to meet the needs of young people.

The Association has carried out studies of its aims, which have been discussed by study groups at all levels, and has investigated group leadership training. The studies have led to the implementation of programmes on sex education, moral training, the environment and creativity.

The Association emphasizes the need for greater participation of young people in policy-making meetings. It focuses on welcoming young people outside the Movement to camps, developing an Extension Branch for handicapped children, carrying out nature conservation, extending international relationships, and increasing projects to aid developing countries.

All the sections are mixed and the educational programme is based on co-educational principles. For the Association, the best way to help young people grow (both girls and boys) is to learn to act together, each sex helping the other to develop their potential.

The Association publishes several periodicals for all age groups and their leaders including L’Equipée-Loustic and Routes Nouvelles.

 

Organisation name: Eclaureuses et Eclaireurs Unionistes de France (EEUF)

 

Age Groups with names

Aînée Ranger 15-18

Eclaireuse/Eclaireur Girl Scout /Scout 12-15

Louvette/Louveteau Brownie/Cub 8-11

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

In 1970 the Fédération Française des Eclaireuses Unionistes merged with the Eclaireurs Unionistes de France to become the Fédération des Eclaireuses et Eclaireurs Unionistes de France, a co-educational federation providing a Protestant education.

French Guiana (Europe Region)

Organisation name: Scouts de Guyane

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Scouting in French Guiana mainly follows the program of the Scouts et Guides de France (SGdF), but there are also groups of the Éclaireuses et Éclaireurs de France. The SGdF's Région Guyane (also known as Scouts et Guides de Guyane) is an associate member of the Interamerican Scout Region of the World Organization of the Scout Movement.

Scouting came to French Guiana in the 1930s. The first group of the Scout de France (SdF) was founded in spring 1934 in Cayenne, inspired by the Eclaireurs de France who were started a couple of years earlier by Samuel Chambaud. It wasn't until the mid of the 1950s that a second group of the Scout de France was formed. In 1958, the movement was large enough to be organised in some districts, but Scouting in French Guiana still was not really stable. The following years saw again the loss of some groups.

Gambia – Africa Region

Organisation name: The Gambia Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 18-21

Guide 12-18

Brownie 7-11

Rose bud 4-6

 

Members: 17395

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in the Gambia started in 1923. Wives of British civil servants in the Gambia together with interested Gambian women kept the Movement on its feet at the time. Packs, companies and units were operational within the urban area and Guiding continued to function until 1943 when it became dormant due to lack of adult Leaders.

In 1946, however, it was revived by the first Gambian Chief Guide Commissioner, Mrs Rosamond Fowlls, who after her studies in the United Kingdom came home full of zeal and enthusiasm and put Gambia on the map of Guiding.

During this period Guiding was established in various parts of the country and the number of companies and packs continued to increase.

Guiding is now found in every accessible area of the country and has reached all sections of communities regardless of religion and ethnic origin. Many packs, companies and units are school based, due to the fact that the majority of adult Leaders are teachers and have the ability to devote much of their leisure time to the growth and development of children, preparing them for the demands and challenges of society in a rapidly changing world

Georgia – Europe Region

Organisation name: Sakartvelos Gogona Skautebis Asociacia (DIA)

 

Age Groups with names

Dia (Star) 16-23

Tsitsinatela (Firefly) 10-15

Baya (Young People) 7-9

 

Members: 192

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Girl Guides and Girl Scouts Association was the first national organization promoted Guiding and Scouting Movement in Georgia. In 1993, due to a majority of boys in the membership and at the request of the girls’ representatives, the Association was renamed as Guides and Scouts Association of the Republic of Georgia.

The 19 April is an official celebration day for the Association of the Girl Scouts of Georgia ‘Dia’, as the anniversary of Georgia’s First National Girl Scout Conference in 1997.

Supervised by WAGGGS and Link organizations such as the Irish Girl Guides (IGG) and the Northwest Georgia Girl Scout Council (USA, Atlanta, Georgia), the Georgian Association managed to achieve great success in promoting Guiding methods all over the country throughout their joint activities in 1993-1994 and in 1999-2000 with IGG.

In 1995 a training centre was set up to encourage Georgian girls to get basic knowledge of Guiding training methods and programmes.

Since March 1998 ‘Dia’, in co-operation with WAGGGS, has been carrying out a project called the Non-formal Education of Girls in the Caucasian Area. It has proved to be an efficiently organized project with a packed scheme of regional and international training for leaders.

The development of regions is carried out according to the strategy for development. ‘Dia’ includes a balance of ethnic groups and population sectors. This is especially important in Georgia which is renowned for its multicultural society.

Germany – Europe Region

Organisation name: Ring Deutscher Pfadfinderinnenverbände (RDP)

 

Members: 51749

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Ring Deutscher Pfadfinderinnenverbände was formerly composed of four separate Girl Guide Associations: Bund Deutscher Pfadfinderinnen, Evangelischer Mädchenpfadfinderbund, Bund Christlicher Pfadfinderinnen in Bavaria and Pfadfinderinnenschaft St. Georg.

In 1973 the Evangelischer Mädchenpfadfinderbund, Bund Christlicher Pfadfinderinnen and Christliche Pfadfinderschaft Deutschlands (Protestant Boy Scouts) merged to form the Verband Christlicher Pfadfinderinnen und Pfadfinder (VCP) (Christian Girl Guide and Boy Scout Association). In 1976 the Bund Deutscher Pfadfinderinnen and Bund der Pfadfinder (Scout Association) also merged to become the Bund der Pfadfinderinnen und Pfadfinder (BdP) (Association of Girl Guides and Boy Scouts).

This was the situation up until 1990 when the historic reunification of Germany took place. This event had direct repercussions within all the German Associations. Guiding had existed throughout the entire State of Germany prior to its division following the Second World War, and now the path lay open for its re-establishment in the former Democratic Republic of Germany once again.

Bund der Pfadfinderinnen und Pfadfinder (BdP)

Verband Christlicher Pfadfinderinnen und Pfadfinder (VCP)

Pfadfinderinnenschaft Sankt Georg (PSG)

 

Organisation name: Bund der Pfadfinderinnen und Pfadfinder (BdP)

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger (Ranger) 16+

Pfadfinderin (Guide) 11-15

Wölfling (Cub/Brownie) 7-11

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The BdP is an inter-denominational merged Association and partner in the RDP (Union of German Girl Guide Associations). The Association is open to all girls and boys. It has teams of male and female leaders at all levels, and local groups have the right to decide whether they wish to work in mixed or in separate groupings. Girls and boys can take part in activities from the age of seven years.

The Guide/Scout section, from 12 to 16 years, introduces hikes, travelling and camps as major outdoor activities for this age group. In the ‘Sippe’(patrol), the small unit in the Scout/Guide section (Pfadfinderstufe), young people are encouraged to develop their independence and self-reliance.

Those over 16 years, in the Ranger/Rover section, are widely self-supporting in their activities. They look beyond the realm of the group, and are active in caring for the environment and the community. Adults find their place in BdP as leaders, in lobby groups, as sponsors or specialists who help the group out on special occasions.

Activities help to acquire technical, physical, musical, social and spiritual abilities; help to develop an individual personality and gain self-confidence; facilitate living and problem solving in a group; strengthen the ability to take over responsibility, political awareness, openness and creativity; and heighten awareness of the environment and one’s own community.

 

Organisation name: Verband Christlicher Pfadfinderinnen und Pfadfinder (VCP)

 

Age Groups with names

Erwachsene (Adult) 18+

Ranger (Ranger) 14-18

Pfadfinderinnen (Guide) 12-14

Kinderstufe (Children’s level) 7-11

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The VCP is a Protestant merged Association for girls and boys of all denominations. Most of the groups are mixed at all age levels, and leadership training is carried out on a co-educational basis. Through a special voting system, every member participates in decision-making at the annual general assembly of the Association.

Faith plays an important part in the programme of the VCP and members are involved in a broad range of activities, mainly organized at regional level. These include working with socially deprived groups, campaigning for the rights of children in society, aiding community development, and the protection of nature.

 

Organisation name: Pfadfinderinnenschaft Sankt Georg (PSG)

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger Ranger 16+

Caravelle Caravelle 13-16

Pfadi Guide 10-13

Wichtel Brownie 7-10

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The PSG was founded in 1947 as the Association of Catholic Guides in the Federal Republic of Germany. Now it is open to all girls and young women who agree with the aims of the Association and are willing to work within their groups towards their realization.

Ghana – Africa Region

Organisation name: The Ghana Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Adult Leaders 25+

Young Leaders 15-21

Rangers 12-15

Girl Guides 10-12

Brownies 7-10

Huhuwa Guides 6-7

 

Members: 19191

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Ghana was launched in Accra in 1921 and spread to towns and villages all over the country during the next 20 years. In 1930 the Association’s headquarters were built in Accra, and since 1945 cadet companies have been established in most of the women’s training colleges.

Gibraltar (Europe Region)

Organisation name:Girlguiding Gibraltar

 

Age Groups with names

Rainbows 5+

Brownies 7+

Guides 10+

Senior Section 14+

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Girl Guides troop in Gibraltar was formed in summer 1914, its creation was reported to the Colonial Secretary on 28 August 1914. However, the official founding year of the branch is given with 1925 and was remembered by three stamps issued on 10 October 1975.

In April 2009 the Gibraltar Parliament conferred the Honorary Freedom of the City of Gibraltar upon the local Girl Guide movement in recognition of decades of positive contribution to the community.

Girlguiding Gibraltar (formerly Gibraltar Girl Guide Association) is a Guiding organization in Gibraltar. It is one of the nine branch associations of Girlguiding UK. It is represented by Girlguiding UK at World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) level and Girlguiding UK's Chief Guide is also Chief Guide for Girlguiding Gibraltar. The program is a modified form of Guiding in the United Kingdom, adapted to suit local conditions, with the same promise, and Rainbow, Brownie, Guide and Ranger groups.

Greece – Europe Region

Organisation name: Soma Hellinikou Odigismou (SHO)

 

Age Groups with names

Megali Odigos/ Ranger/ 14 - 17

Naftodigos Sea Ranger 14 - 17

Odigos Guide 11 - 14

Pouli Bird 7 - 11

Asteri Star 5 - 7

 

Members: 6589

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding was established in Greece in 1932 and was revived in 1945 after a period of inactivity during the Second World War. The Movement has since spread throughout the country and Soma Hellinidon Odigon (the Greek Girl Guides Association) is now the largest youth organization in Greece.

Greenland – Europe Region

Organisation name: Kalallit Nunaanni Spejderit Kattufiat Grønlands Spejderkorps

 

Age Groups with names

Seniorspejdere (Ranger) 15+

Spejdere (Guide) 10-15

Juniorspejdere (Junior Guide) 7-10

 

Members: 2000

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Greenland is carried out through the Kalaallit Nanaanni Spejderit Kattufiat - Grønlands Spejderkorps, and this Association, open to girls and boys, has international recognition through the national organization. Total membership in 1985 was approximately 2,000.

Grenada – Western Hemisphere

Organisation name: The Girl Guides Association of Grenada

 

Age Groups with names

Rainbows – 5+

Brownies – 7+

Guides – 10+

Senior Section – 14+

 

Members: 2288

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Guide company in Grenada was set up at the Church of England High School in 1925. Other Guide companies were soon formed, and the first Brownie packs were introduced in 1927 and the first Ranger company in 1928. In 1936 the government gave the Association a piece of land as the site for its headquarters.

Guiding had started well in Grenada but political problems in the following years slowed down the development of the Movement. Until 1983 Grenada was a Branch Association of the Guide Association (UK), but that year the United Kingdom granted Grenada self-government in all areas of work.

In 1985 the Association held its first international camp, attended by neighbouring Caribbean Associations. During the next few years trainers and advisers from WAGGGS and the United Kingdom visited Grenada to help the Association to develop its programme and a firm structure. Guiding is now active in most parishes, with the majority of units attached to schools and a few to churches and communities.

In 1989 the first Rainbow unit was started in a small village called Binchgrove in the largest parish, St. Andrew.

Guadeloupe and Saint Martin

 

See Guides de France

Guam

 

See Girl Scouts USA

Guatemala – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Asociación Nacional De Muchachas Guías De Guatemala

 

Age Groups with names

Guía Mayor (Ranger) 16-18

Guía Intermedia (Guide) 13-15

Guía Pequeña (Junior Guide) 10-12

Caperucita (Little Riding Hood) 7-9

Abeja (Bee) 4-6

 

Members: 418

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Movement began in Guatemala in 1934 and the Association was officially formed in the following year. The Association received a plot of land following its service to the country during the revolution in 1944, and, due to the fundraising efforts of Movement members, a meeting house and swimming pool were constructed. In 1984, when the Association celebrated its 50th Anniversary, special efforts were made to increase membership. The government gave the Association the highest award in recognition of 50 years of service to the community, and the capital city honoured the Association with a gold medal diploma and ribbon.

Guinea – Africa Region

Organisation name: Association Nationale Des Guides De Guinée

 

Age Groups with names

Koffa (Senior Guide) 17-25

Sounkouroun (Guide) 12-16

Malèkèdi (Brownie) 6-11

 

Members: 4880

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding, like Scouting, existed before independence, but when the revolutionary regime came to power, all the Movements were merged into the JRDA (African Revolutionary and Democratic Youth).

 

Through the work of a Malagasy missionary nun, Guiding started again on 22 February 1986 and from that date onwards its development has been remarkable, spreading to the whole territory. For example, in Lower Guinea it has reached Conakry, Coyah, Forécariah, Kindia, Boffa; in Higher Guinea Kankan and Siguiri; and in Sylvan Guinea Kissidougou, Gueckédou N’Zérékoré, Beyla, Macenta and Lola.

 

Guiding is established in the four natural areas (Maritime Guinea, Higher Guinea, Mid Guinea, Sylvan Guinea). All religious denominations are represented in the Movement. It is hoped to continue the spread of Guiding to rural areas.

 

The association became Full Member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts during the 35th World Conference that took place in Hong Kong in July 2014.

Guyana (Europe Region)

Organisation name: Guyana Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger Guide 14-18 or 20

Guide 10-16

Brownie Guide 7-11

 

Members: 1787

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding began in Guyana in 1922 and the Movement was officially registered as a Branch Association of the Guide Association (UK) in 1924. By 1927 the Association had its own headquarters in Georgetown and by 1932 two Ranger companies were in operation.

In the years that followed, much intensive training was undertaken throughout Guyana with the help of trainers from other countries.

Haiti – Western Hemisphere

Organisation name: Associatino Nationale des Guides D’Haiti

 

Age Groups with names

Guide Aînée (Senior Guide) 18-25

Guide Relais (Ranger) 15+

Guide (Guide) 12+

Jeannette (Brownie) 7-12

 

Members: 1582

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Haiti started with a group of pupils and former pupils of a girls schools, Ste Thérèse de l’Enfant Jésus, directed by Mme Carmen René Durocher. These pupils established a club offering out-of-school activities. One of the girls, impressed by her brother’s Scouting activities, asked to incorporate these activities into the club. Mme Durocher contacted the Scout representatives, the religious order in charge and then WAGGGS which eventually led to the establishment of Guiding in Haiti in October 1942. Later on, boarders at St Rose of Lima School became interested in Scouting methods and formed the second Girl Guide group. Guiding spread through the country and Lady Baden-Powell visited Haiti in March 1951.

 

In 1990, an intermediate branch between the Guides and the Guides Aînées was introduced on a trial basis as the Guides Relais.

Honduras – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Asociación Nacional De Muchachas Guías De Honduras

 

Age Groups with names

Guía Mayor (Senior Guide) 15-18

Guía Intermediate (Intermedia Guide) 11-14

Abeja (Bee) 7-10

 

Members: 142

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Honduras began in 1953 when the trainer/adviser for the Western Hemisphere gathered together a group of girls and women and told them about Girl Guiding/Girl Scouting and WAGGGS. She set up a committee which worked on the organization of the Asociación Nacional de Muchachas Guías de Honduras. The first National Executive Committee was established in 1958, at a time when a number of Brownie packs and Guide companies already existed.

 

In 1964, an office was obtained on the ground floor of the Archbishop’s Palace in Tegucigalpa, which was used as a meeting place for members. By 1968, with the help of a member of the Peace Corps and periodic visits from the Western Hemisphere trainer/adviser, Guiding had spread to other towns both north and south of the capital.

 

The first National Assembly was held in 1972, and in the same year the Association obtained legal status.

Hong Kong – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: The Hong Kong Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger Guide 15-21

Guide 10-18

Brownie Guide 6-12

 

Members: 59030

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding began in Hong Kong in 1916 when a Girl Guide company was formed at the Victoria British School. An Association was organized and registered as a Branch Association of the Guide Association (UK) in 1919.

 

Membership had increased steadily by that time, but suffered a major setback when Guiding activities were forbidden during the Second World War. Members continued to meet, however, and kept the spirit of Guiding alive. In 1948 a rally was held in the grounds of Government House and in the same year the Association was invited to join the newly-formed Social Welfare Department. This marked the beginning of the Movement’s involvement in social welfare in Hong Kong. In 1970 the Association adopted the Eight Point Programme. Handbooks and other reference material were produced in English and Chinese.

 

In 1997, Hong Kong became a Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China. Guiding continued to flourish. In 2000, policy for uniformed groups came under the Home Affairs Bureau Youth Development subvention programme.

Hungary – Europe Region

Organisation name: Magyar Cserkészleány Szövetség (MCSLSZ)

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 16 +

Girl Guide 11-15

Brownie 8-11

Fairy 6-8

 

Members: 654

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Guide group in Hungary was set up in 1919. The National Association of Hungarian Girl Guides was founded in 1921 and recognized as a member of the International Council, the forerunner of WAGGGS, in 1922. In 1928, the Hungarian Girl Guides Association acted as hostess to the Fifth International Conference of Guiding when the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts was founded. In 1939, the first Girl Guide/Girl Scout World Camp, Pax Ting, was held in Hungary and attended by some 4,000 Guides from around the world.

 

During the war years of 1939 to 1945 the Movement was involved in relief work in hospitals and helping refugees. With the siege of the capital, the Association’s activities were suspended. Guiding activities resumed after the war, but in 1948 the government banned all youth organizations and the Association was forced to cease functioning for the next 40 years.

 

The first attempts to reorganize the Movement started in 1988 as a response to political change in Hungary. In 1989 Magyar Cserkészleány Szövetség (the Association of Hungarian Girl Guides) was re-launched. A Central Committee concentrated on training potential leaders. In 1996, there were twenty troops, mostly working in schools.

Iceland – Europe Region

Organisation name: Bandalag Íslenskra Skáta (BIS)

 

Age Groups with names

Svannar (Ranger/Rover) 18+

Dróttskátar (Senior/Venture) 15-18

Skátar (Girl Scout) 11-14

Ylfingar (Cub) 9-10

Ljósálfar (Brownie) 7-8

 

Members: 2048

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first troop for girls in Iceland was formed in the capital, Reykjavík, in July 1922 under the direction of the YWCA. The connection between the YWCA and Girl Scouting only lasted a short while, but the Movement spread independently throughout most of the country. Within a few years many new troops for girls started.

Icelandic Girl Scouts became a member of WAGGGS in 1928, and in 1939 the Icelandic Girl Scout Association was formed. In 1944 the two national Girl and Boy Scout Associations merged and became Bandalag Íslenskra Skáta (the Icelandic Boy and Girl Scout Association). The Association is believed to be the first merged Association in the world.

India – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: The Bharat Scouts and Guides: the Girl Guide Section

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 16-25

Guide 10-17+

Bulbul 5-10

 

Members: 1780545

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

In 1948 India was welcomed as a separate member of WAGGGS, having been a Founder Member of the World Association, together with present-day Pakistan and Bangladesh, under the name of India, in 1928.

The Girl Guides Association (India) joined together with the nationally recognized Joint Movement in 1951, shortly after India became a Republic, to form the Bharat Scouts and Guides (Bharat being the ancient name for India). Guides and Scouts take part in jamborees, camp fires and other special events together,

Ireland – Europe Region

Organisation name: Council of Irish Guiding Associations (CIGA)

 

Members: 15935

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding started in Ireland in 1910, at that time it was part of the UK and part of UK Guiding.  When Ireland became in independent country, Guiding in Ireland separated from the UK too, splitting fully in 1932.

In July 1993, at the 28th World Conference in Denmark, the Council of Irish Guiding Associations was ratified as a full member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts, and was recognized as continuing the full membership gained by the Irish Girl Guides in 1932. The Council consists of the Irish Girl Guides and the Catholic Guides of Ireland, on behalf of their members resident in the Republic of Ireland.

The aims and objectives of CIGA are:

  • to enable membership of WAGGGS to be held by the Irish Girl Guides and the Catholic Guides of Ireland on behalf of their members resident in the Republic of Ireland;
  • to promote and further the objectives of the World Association as expressed in Article 111 of the constitution and by-laws of WAGGGS;
  • to encourage strong dialogue and close co-operation amongst the family of Guiding in the whole of Ireland; to work towards a single Movement;
  • to find a way for all members of the Catholic Guides of Ireland to become full members of WAGGGS as soon as possible. Until this is accomplished, all members of CGI can participate in international activities emanating from member organizations of WAGGGS or advertised as open to all by WAGGGS, but only members of CIGA can represent CIGA at a World Conference or other WAGGGS events organized on behalf of the World Board or one of its sub-committees.

The logo represents the interlinking of the two Guiding Associations and the sharing and co-operation that is taking place.

CIGA organizes activities for its members at the various branch levels, so that the girls and their leaders can meet and work together. Work is ongoing regarding common regulations and badge syllabi. A number of joint CIGA delegations have represented Ireland at WAGGGS events, particularly Juliette Low seminars. In 1999, CIGA hosted the 30th World Conference in Dublin. Both Associations worked together to organize this event.

 

Organisation name: Catholic Guides of Ireland (CGI)

Age Groups with names:

Ranger Guide 14-19

Guide 10-17

Brígín Guide 6-11

Cygnet Guide 5-6

 

Organisation name: The Irish Girl Guides (IGG)

Age Groups with names

Young Leader 15-18

Ranger 14 -21

Guide 10 -15

Brownie 6 -11

Ladybird 5-7

Israel – Europe Region

Organisation name: Israel Boy and Girl Scouts Federation (IBGSF)

 

Age Groups with names

Tsofe (Ranger) 15-18

Nachshon (Girl Scout) 11-14

Ofer (Brownie) 9-10

 

Members: 11268

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Israel Boy and Girl Scouts Federation is composed of six component Associations: the Hebrew Boy and Girl Scout Association, the Arab Schools Boy and Girl Scouts, the Israel Arab Boy and Girl Scouts, the Israel Greek Orthodox Boy and Girl Scouts, the Israel Catholic Boy and Girl Scouts and the Israel Druze Boy and Girl Scout Association.

Scouting is Israel in much older than the State of Israel itself. It dates back to 1919 when Scouts visited Palestine and encouraged other interested people to form a Scout Association.

The component Associations are:

The Israel Arab Muslim Boy and Girl Scouts (IAMBGS)

The Israel Druze Boy and Girl Scout Association (IDBGSA)

The Israel Greek Orthodox Boy and Girl Scouts (OSA)

The Israel Arab School Boy and Girl Scouts (IASBGS)

The Hebrew Boy and Girl Scout Association (HBGSA)

The Israel Arab Catholic Boy and Girl Scouts (IACBGS)

Italy – Europe Region

Organisation name: Federazione Italiana Dello Scautismo (FIS)

 

Members: 86114

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girl Guiding/Girl Scouting activities began in Italy as early as 1912, but were suppressed during the 1920s and did not start again until 1944. The Federazione Italiana Guide Esploratrici was formed in 1945 to link the two existing Associations of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts: Unione Nazionale Giovinette Esploratrici Italiane and the Associazione Guide Italiane.

In 1974 the Associazione Guide Italiane merged with the Associazione Scouts Cattolici Italiani to form Associazione Guide e Scouts Cattolici Italiani (AGESCI). In 1976 the Unione Nazionale Giovinette Esploratrici Italiane merged with the Corpo Nazionale Giovani Esploratori Italiani, to form the Corpo Nazionale Giovani Esploratori ed Esploratrici Italiani (CNGEI).

 

Organisation name: Associazione Guide E Scouts Cattolici Italiani (AGESCI)

 

Age Groups with names

Scolta (Ranger) 16-19/21

Guida (Guide) 11/12-16

Coccinella (Ladybird)/Lupetta (Wolf Cub) 8-11/12

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

AGESCI emphasizes a clear Christian commitment. The programme for girls and boys focuses on co-education, religious education, good citizenship and peace education. Responsibility is shared at all levels between male and female members. Many Ranger, Rover and Brownie/Cub units are mixed. Guide branch activities are carried out either in parallel units, with leaders working together to organize suitable joint activities periodically, or in mixed units. Patrols are always single-sex. AGESCI is studying all aspects of co-education and organizes study groups on this subject. Members with special needs are integrated into standard units.

 

Organisation name: Corpo Nazionale Giovani Esploratori ed Esploratrici Italiani (CNGEI)

 

Age Groups with names

Rover (Ranger) 15/16-18/19

Esploratrice (Girl Scout) 11/12-15/16

Lupetto (Wolf Cub/Brownie) 8-11/12

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

CNGEI emphasizes that it is open to young people of both sexes and all religious beliefs. The Association functions under the patronage of the President of the Italian Republic.

Ivory Coast - Africa Region

Organisation name: Fédération Ivoirienne Du Scoutisme Féminin

 

Members: 4146

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girl Guiding and Girl Scouting in the Ivory Coast is carried out under the auspices of Scoutisme Féminin de Côte d’Ivoire, which co-ordinates the activities of the three component Associations: the Association des Guides de Côte d’Ivoire, formed in 1955; the Association des Eclaireuses Unionistes, formed in 1958, and the Association des Eclaireuses Laïques (formerly Les Eclaireurs et Eclaireuses de Côte d’Ivoire) formed in 1937. Girl Guides and Girl Scouts are now active throughout the entire country.

Organisation name: Guides Catholiques de Cote D’Ivoire

Age Groups with names

Aînée (Ranger) 18-25

Guide (Guide) 12-17

Jeannette (Brownie) 8-12

 

Organisation name: Les Eclaireuses Laiques de Cote D’Ivoire

Age Groups with names

Eclaireuse aînée (Senior Guide) 17-21

Eclaireuse (Girl Scout) 12-16

Louvette (Lark/Brownie) 6-11

 

Organisation name: Eclaireuses Unionistes de Cote D’Ivoire

Age Groups with names

Aînée ou Branche Rouge 20+

Eclaireuse (Girl Scout) 11-16

Alouette (Lark) 7-10

Jamaica – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: The Girl Guides Association of Jamaica

 

Age Groups with names

Senior Branch 14-20

Guide 11-16

Brownie 7-11

 

Members: 5903

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

In 1915, Jamaica’s first Guide company was formed in Spanish Town, Saint Catherine. In 1916, the first camp was held and three years later a Ranger unit was started. In 1967, the Girl Guides Association of Jamaica was registered as a non-profit company limited by guarantee.

In 2000, the Association celebrated 85 years of continuous Guiding. Throughout its history the Association has held a series of local, regional and international activities. A consistent supporter of the World Association, Jamaica has regularly encouraged its members to contribute to the Thinking Day Fund and triennial projects.

Japan – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Girl Scouts of Japan

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger Girl Scout 15-17

Senior Girl Scout 12-15

Junior Girl Scout 9-12

Brownie Girl Scout 6-9

Tenderfoot Girl Scout 5-6

 

Members: 34927

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girl Scouting was first introduced to Japan by Miss Muriel Greenstreet, a British missionary teacher, in 1919. The Movement gradually spread and in 1920 took the name Nihon Joshi Hododan (Girl Guides of Japan). In 1928 Japan became a founder member of WAGGGS.

 

Unfortunately Girl Scouting was banned by the Government during World War II, but its spirit remained. The Movement was restarted in 1947 and officially recognized as Girl Scouts of Japan (GSJ) in 1949.

 

In 1995, Girl Scouts of Japan introduced Long-Term Plan/Action Plans 1995-2000. This is based on WAGGGS’ Long-Term Plan and its four objectives helped troops and Councils to plan activities/events suitable to their needs:

Jordan – Arab Region

Organisation name: The Jordanian Association for Boy Scouts and Girl Guides

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 18-23

Girl Guide 11-17

Brownie 7-11

 

Members: 9080

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Jordan began in 1938, although it was only in 1953 that the first Guide group was officially recognized. Girls in schools were then encouraged to become Guides, and courses were held for teachers wishing to become leaders.

In 1954 the first Brownie pack was started, and by 1955 membership had increased to about 2,000. In 1962 the Girl Guide Association of Jordan was set up and Her Majesty the late Queen Zein Al Sharaf appointed as its first Honorary President. The following year His Majesty the late King Hussein issued a decree placing the Association under royal patronage.

In 1975 the first conference of Scout and Guide leaders was held at Ajlun, the national campsite, where it was decided that the Girl Guide Association of Jordan would merge with the Boy Scouts Association. In 1976 the Boy Scouts and Girl Guides of Jordan was formed.

In 1985 the second conference of Scout and Guide leaders was held in Amman.

In 1988 Princess Basma Bint Talal became the President of the Jordanian Association of Boy Scouts and Girl Guides of Jordan. The 32nd World Conference was held in Jordan in 2005.

Kenya – Africa Region

Organisation name: Kenya Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger Cadet 18-25

Ranger Guide 14-18

Guide 10 -14

Brownie 7-11

 

Members: 159399

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding began in Kenya in 1920, when the first Guide company held its meeting in the grounds of Government House in Nairobi. A Brownie pack was started in the same year in a primary school, and in 1923 a Cadet company was opened in Nairobi. In 1922 the Association was registered as a Branch Association of the Girl Guides Association (UK).

During the early years, Guiding was confined to schools attended only by European girls, but in 1935 the first Indian Guide company and Brownie pack were opened in Nairobi. The following year saw the introduction of the first Guide company for African girls. Guiding spread rapidly, except during the Second World War, and in 1943 the first rally for African Guides was held. In 1949 the fairy lore imagery used in Brownie activities was replaced by bird lore, which had more relevance to the Kenyan girl.

In 1963, the Guide House was officially opened for training by Lady Baden Powell. Kenya also became a Tenderfoot Member of WAGGGS. In 1972, the Kenya Girl Guides Association celebrated its Golden Jubilee with an International Camp.

Kenya Girl Guides Association attained full membership of WAGGGS in 1975 when the Africa Region Committee was also established.

Lady Olave Baden Powell died in 1977, and a memorial service was held at All Saints Cathedral, with her ashes being buried in Nyeri.

The 26th WAGGGS World Conference was held at Egerton University College, Njoro in 1987, and this was the first World Conference ever held on African soil. In 1991, the Kenya Girl Guides Association hosted the Euro-Africa Seminar.

Kiribati – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: The Girl Guides Association of Kiribati

 

Age Groups with names

Sunbeams

Guides

Rangers

 

Members: 2833

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

In 1926 a member of the London Missionary Society introduced Guiding to Kiribati, then known as the Gilbert Islands. The first Guide and Ranger companies were opened at the Training College for London Missionary Pastors in Rongorongo on the island of Beru. A few years later the Catholic Church also started units around the country.

 

Guiding activities were interrupted during the Second World War when the islands were occupied by foreign troops and the missionaries who had supported the Movement left the area.

 

In 1957 Guiding was restarted in the three main centres of Tarawa: Bairiki, Betio and Bikenibeu, supported by both local and expatriate women. The Association grew and reached schools in the outer islands. Cadet troops were also started at the training college and in secondary schools.

 

The Department of Education gave the Association its full support in developing Guiding, and seconded two teachers to the Association to travel to the outer islands to train leaders and assist in the recruitment of girls. The Association was also allowed to use the postal service free of charge.

 

In 1979 the Gilbert Islands became an independent republic under the name of Kiribati. In 1989 the Guide Association (UK) signed a Deed of Transfer giving the Girl Guides Association of Kiribati self-government in all areas of work.

 

In 1989 the Association devised a five-year plan to extend the Movement to the outer islands, a development hampered by lack of funds.

South Korea – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Girl Scouts of Korea

 

Age Groups with names

Cho-rok-byeol (Twinkler Scout) 4-5

Gae-na-ri (Brownie Scout) 6-8

Jin-dal-rae (Junior Scout) 8-11

So-nyeo-dae (Cadette Scout) 12-14

Yeon-jang-dae (Senior Scout) 15-17

Yeon-gu-dae (Young Leader) 18-30

Seong-in Hoe-won (Adult Member) 21~

 

Members: 45139

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girl Scouting started in Korea in 1946, but its expansion was temporarily halted by the Korean war in 1950, even though girls and leaders actively joined in relief works and service activity. After the War and after making great efforts to organize its system, decide uniform and badge and publish handbooks, Girl Scouts of Korea became a Full Member of WAGGGS in 1963. In 1969 the national headquarters building was completed and the Scouting Promotion Bill, which facilitated the organization of troops in schools, was passed in the National Assembly.

Since 1977, extension troops have been operating in Korea for girls with special needs, and a Disabled Supporting Fund was established in 1988. In 1989 a new branch, Mindlrae, was established for pre-school children. At the dawn of the new Millennium, Girl Scouts of Korea have in place initiatives to improve the position of girls and women and contribute to Korean society by taking the lead in activities, especially those concerned with the environment, peace and education for girls and young women. Furthermore, GSK has made great efforts to provide opportunities for girls and young women to train to become world citizens through various global activities.

Kuwait – Arab Region

Organisation name: Kuwait Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Senior Guide 17-23

Guide 12-16

Brownie 7-11

Rainbow Blossoms 5-6

 

Members: 15000

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Kuwait began in 1957 on a limited basis. By 1960, however, much improved programmes had helped to strengthen the Movement, and Guiding then spread to most schools throughout the country. The Association became established by 1965 and was licensed by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Labour at that time. In 1975 it came under the supervision of the Ministry of Education as it still is today. The Association became recognized in the country as an active educational force which offered young girls and women an opportunity for training on sound leadership.

Latvia – Europe Region

Organisation name: Latvijas Skautu un Gauidu Centrala Organizacija (LSGCO)

 

Age Groups with names

Lielgaida (Ranger) 16+

Gaida (Guide) 11-16

Guntina (Little Fire) 7-11

 

Members: 371

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding was started in Latvia in 1921 under the umbrella of the Latvian Youth Organizations. In early 1922 the Latvijas Gaidu Centrala Organizacija (the Girl Guides Central Organization of Latvia) was set up and Girl Guiding was permitted to operate as an independent organization. Latvia was a Founder Member of WAGGGS in 1928, enjoyed a visit from Olave Baden-Powell, World Chief Guide in 1933 and had a very active Guiding life until the Movement was banned in 1940.

Fifty years later, in 1990, Latvian Guiding and Scouting was officially re-started as Latvijas Skautu un Gaidu Centrala Organizacija (LSGCO, the Latvian Scout and Guide Central Organization). WAGGGS appointed the Swedish Guide and Scout Council, which already had contacts with Latvia, as the Western European ‘Link’ country for the organization, promoting a close working relationship between the two countries.

Guiding has now been successfully re-introduced to many areas of the country including some small villages.

Lebanon – Arab Region

Organisation name: La Fédération Libanaise des Eclaireuses et des Guides

 

Members: 6772

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girl Guiding/Girl Scouting started in Lebanon in 1937 with the establishment of the Association des Guides du Liban. In 1957 the Association des Eclaireuses du Liban was established and in 1961 the two main Associations combined as one National Organization, the Organisation Nationale des Guides et des Eclaireuses du Liban, which was recognized by the Government.

The Organisation Nationale des Guides et des Eclaireuses du Liban suffered much in the political troubles and war from 1975 to 1990. It was impossible to plan regular activities but in spite of the difficulties the Organization continued to work and could raise enough money to replace its destroyed headquarters by buying new premises in Antelias in the neighbourhood of Beirut.

Improvement of the situation in the country gave a new start to the development of Girl Guiding/Girl Scouting, and membership increased all over Lebanon.

The Organisation Nationale des Guides et des Eclaireuses du Liban has contacts with un-recognized Lebanese Guide Associations, with a view to making a large federation to include them all.

 

Organisation name: Association des Eclaireuses du Liban

 

Age Groups with names

Caravelle (Caravelle) 15-17

Eclaireuse (Girl Scout) 12-14

Petite Aile (Zahrat) (Little Wing) 7-11

 

Organisation name: Association des Guides du Liban

 

Age Groups with names

Jeunes en Marche (Youth on the Move) 18-21

Caravelle (Caravelle) 15-17

Guide (Girl Guide) 12-14

Jeannette (Brownie) 7-11

 

Organisation name: Eclaireuses du Scoutisme Nationale Orthodoxe

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 17-24

Advanced Guide 14-16

Girl Guide 11-14

Brownie 7-11

Blossom 5-7

 

Organisation name: Association des Guides Musulmanes du Liban

 

Organisation name: Association des Eclaireuses Eljarrah

Lesotho – Africa Region

Organisation name: Lesotho Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Young Leader over 18

Ranger 14-17

Guide 10-14

 

Members: 6172

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Lesotho Girl Guides Association (LGGA) was founded as the Basutoland Wayfarer in 1925. LGGA is a full member of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts. Most of the members are from schools.

The LGGA is totally independent to assist young girls to grow into good citizens of their country. The LGGA is committed to the goal of ‘advancement of girls and young women’ and ‘education for a changing world’, hence there is need to focus on health and the development of girls and young women. Most of the training takes place in the districts, but there are monthly skills training sessions at the LGGA headquarters, based on the level and kind of training needed to counsel the Guides, such as Patrol Leaders’ training. Community-based training also takes place accordingly, such as training disabled women on HIV/AIDS education.

Liberia – Africa Region

Organisation name: Liberian Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 16-21

Guide 12-16

Brownie Guide 7-11

 

Members: 7297

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Liberia started in 1920, and in 1928 the Association became a Founder Member of WAGGGS. By 1930, however, all contact between WAGGGS and the Liberian National Organization had been lost and its membership was cancelled in 1931. From 1953 to 1955 efforts were made to revive Guiding and in 1955 a representative of WAGGGS visited Liberia and helped to bring together isolated groups of Guides to form the nucleus of a National Organization. Over the next ten years Guiding spread to all areas of the country with the help of WAGGGS trainers and advisers.

Liberian Guiding has suffered because of civil wars and the partitioning of the country but Guiding is once again re-establishing itself.

Libya – Arab Region

Organisation name: Public Scout and Girl Guide Movement of Libya

 

Members: 4500

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding began in Libya in 1958 when a Brownie pack was opened at a girls’ primary school in Tripoli. The leader was Libyan, assisted by an experienced leader from Lebanon, and an intensive leader training programme was organized for a selected group of Libyan girls. On completion of the course some of them established a Senior Guide unit, with the assistance of the Scout Association, and, soon afterwards, a Guide company was opened.

 

Initially Guiding did not extend beyond a small number of women teachers and students, but gradually more and more people joined the Movement. Additional units were formed in Tripoli and a commissioner was chosen for each section. In 1959 Guiding spread to Benghazi, and soon afterwards to other regions of the country.

Liechtenstein – Europe Region

Organisation name: Pfadfinder und Pfadfinderinnen Liechtensteins (PPL)

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger (Ranger) 18+

Pioniere (Pioneer) 15-18

Pfadfinderin (Girl Guide) 11-15

Bienle (Brownie) 7-11

 

Members: 331

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Scouting in Liechtenstein began in Schaan in 1931 and Guiding started in Vaduz in 1932. A first-aid group for Scouts and Guides was founded in 1973.

The Guides and Scouts have had their own shop since 1976 and in 1979 they started publishing a bi-monthly magazine for leaders, which is called Knoten.

Co-operation between the Scout and the Guide Associations has increased since 1981 when joint activities were organized to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Scout Movement in Liechtenstein. In 1989 the two Associations merged and its official name is now Pfadfinder und Pfadfinderinnen Liechtensteins. HSH Prince Nikolaus of Liechtenstein and his sister, HSH Princess Nora, are honorary members of the Movement.

Among the main events in the scouting year are the annual summer camps, winter camps and various activities for all branches at national level

Lithuania – Europe Region

Organisation name: Leituvos Skauciu Seserija (LSS)

 

Age Groups with names

Gėlytės (Flowerets) aged 4 – 6

Paukštytės (Birdies) aged 6 – 9/10

Skautės (Guides) aged 9/10 – 13/14

Prityrusios skautės (Ventures) aged 13/14 – 16/17

Vyresnes skautės (Senior Guides) aged 16/17 – 23/25

Vyresniosios sesės (Senior Sisters) aged 23+ – Leaders Trainers

 

Members: 652

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding was first introduced to Lithuania in 1926 and was banned during the Soviet rule. Immediately after Lithuania declared independence in 1990, Guiding was restarted with the help from Lithuania Girl Guides in exile. The Lithuanians in exile had formed Scouting and Girl Scouting as a vehicle to pass on the language, history and culture of their country. They followed the programme from the time before 1940 but lived without contact from other guides in the host country. They were reunited with their fellow country men and women when they came back to Lithuania. Lithuania was among the first countries in Eastern Europe where WAGGGS and WOSM worked together to re-establish Guiding and Scouting. The idea was to form a SAGNO, bringing all the four Associations together. The formation of a SAGNO was not realised; instead WOSM created an Association admitting both males and females. A group of female leaders that did not join the Scouts formed a female-only organization, Lietuvos Skauciu Seserija-Lietuvos (LSS). The Europe Region maintained contacts with LSS, providing support through visits and training events.

The Lietuvos Skauciu Seserija-Lietuvos (LSS) is open to all girls and young women in the country without any distinction. There are groups in many regions of the country and most of the groups have all age branches. Only in the very small villages, children can not be divided into age categories. There is a good balance of numbers between girls and young women and leaders and the membership is still growing. As in many European societies, Lithuania has fewer children, but up to now, this fact has not affected the growth of LSS. The Association has 1400 members.

Luxembourg – Europe Region

Organisation name: Bureau de Liaison des Associations Guides du Luxembourg (BLAGL)

 

Members: 1649

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding started in Luxembourg in 1915 and the following year the many different troops in the country were united in one Association. The Association des Girl Guides Luxembourgeoises was established in 1921 and was one of the founder members of WAGGGS in 1928. The Letzeburger Guiden (Catholic Luxembourg Girl Guides) was founded in 1938 by the Director of the Action Catholique Féminine Luxembourgeoise.

In 1958 the two Associations were linked by the formation of The Bureau de Liaison des Associations Guides du Luxembourg. In 1960 the WAGGGS World Conference recognized the Bureau de Liaison des Associations Guides du Luxembourg as the National Organization of Luxembourg.

In 1990 HRH the Grand-Duchess Joséphine-Charlotte of Luxembourg was officially introduced as Chief Guide of the Bureau de Liaison.

Association Des Girl Guides Luxembourgeoises (AGGL)

Letzebuerger Guiden a Scouten (LGS)

 

Organisation name: Association des Girl Guides Luxembourgeoises (AGGL)

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger (Ranger) 16-23

Guide (Guide) 11-16

Wiichtelchen (Brownie) 7-11

Mini-Wiichtel (Mini Brownie) 5-7

 

Organisation name: Letzebuerger Guiden a Scouten (LGS)

 

Age Groups with names

 

Guide/Scout Ranger/Rover 17-23

Caravelle/Caravelle Guide/Pionier Pioneer Scout 14-16

Aventure/ Adventure Guide/Explorer Explorer Scout 11-14

Wiichtel/ Brownie/Wöllef Cub (Scout) 8-11

Biber Biber 6-8

Madagascar – Africa Region

Organisation name: Skotisma Zazavavy Eto Madagasikara

 

Members: 44048

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Skotisma Zazavavy eto Madagasikara (Fédération du Scoutisme Féminin de Madagascar), composed of three Associations, works to expand Girl Guiding and Girl Scouting in the country, and to help with leadership training.

Fanilon’i Madagasikara

Guiding which catered for the needs of the Catholic girl was introduced into Madagascar in 1941 by a Commissioner from the Guides de France. The first companies and packs were started in 1942 and Guiding expanded rapidly.

Kiadin’ I Madagasikara is the female branch of the Eclaireuses et Eclaireur Laiques et Pluralists de Madagascar and is non-denominational. The first Brownie was formed in 1953 under the auspices of the Eclaireuses et Eclairuers de France. Girl Scouting is now established in all regions of the island.

 

Organisation name: Fanilon ‘I Madagasikara

 

Age Groups with names

6 to 9 years: HANITRINIALA

10 to 13 years: TANTELIALA

14 to 16 years: VAHINDANITRA

17 - 25 years: AFO

In addition, there are two specialized branches:

Branch for disabled (RANOVELONA)

Branch for rural Guides (VARY)

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Since its foundation in 1942, the Movement has not stopped existing and always tried to fulfil the aspirations of girls and young women.

Fanilo pays particular attention to female identity and a new profile of women that match with the needs of the church and the country.

Located throughout the island in the 21 dioceses (in parishes, schools and universities, towns and rural villages), the Movement is structured in Districts, groups and units which are directly in contact with girls.

The guideline of the Movement is defined every 5 years with a National Congress. Every two years, senior officials commissioners hold a general meeting for the activity report, discuss and define the activities to achieve. The national team directs and coordinates the decisions of the General Assembly and ensures facilitation, training and relation of the association.

 

Organisation name: Kiadini Madagasikara

 

Age Groups with names

Eclaireuse aînée (Ranger) 17-21

Eclaireuse (Girl Scout) 12-16

Louvette (Brownie) 7-11

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Kiadin’ny Madagasikara is the female branch of the Eclaireuses et Eclaireurs de Madagascar, and is non-denominational. The first Brownie pack was formed in 1952 under the auspices of the Eclaireuses et Eclaireurs de France. Girl Scouting is now established in all regions of the island.

 

Organisation name: Mpanazava Eto Madagasikara

 

Age Groups with names

Eclaireuse aînée (Ranger) 18-21

Cordée (Rope) 14-17

Eclaireuse (Girl Scout) 10-13

Louvette (Brownie) 6-9

Are en ciel (Rainbow) 3-5

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Mpanazava eto Madagasikara was set up in 1941 by missionary sisters and provides a Protestant education. In May 1941 the first training camp for Girl Scouts was organized, and three months later three Girl Scout companies and one Brownie pack were in existence. Membership spread to rural areas quickly and by 1946 a Ranger unit had been formed.

Malawi – Africa Region

Organisation name: The Malawi Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names (Local Name and English Language Equivalent

Brownie 6-10

Guides 11-15

Ranger 16-

Members: 54144

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding began in Malawi in 1924 when the first Brownie, Guide, and Ranger units were registered in Zomba the then capital of Malawi. However Guiding was banned for a time and it was not until 1995 that the state president lifted the ban following discussions with the Kenya Girl Guides Association. The first training was held in 1997 in Blantyr, Lilongwe (the new capital) and Mzuzu where 46 Guiders enrolled. After these training courses, small units opened in a few schools in the Northern, central and Southern regions of Malawi. An interim Committee was elected with the aim of organising the Guiding activities and a National Executive Committee was elected in 2000. This has 17 members. This development was supervised by the Ministry of Gender Youth Community Services and the National Youth Council of Malawi. The Ministry of Education, Science and Technology also assists the Associations by allowing teachers and pupils to become members and participate in various activities.

Malaysia – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Persatuan Pandu Puteri, Malaysia

 

Age Groups with names

Kelab Renjer /Pandu Puteri Ranger Club 20+

Kelab Pandu Puteri Guide Club 20+

Kadet Pandu Puteri Cadet 20+

Renjer Puteri Ranger 15-19

Pandu Puteri Girl Guide 12-15

Tunas Puteri Brownie 8-12

 

Members: 52858

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding has gathered momentum and strength since it was introduced in Malaysia in 1916. Persatuan Pandu Puteri Malaysia (Girl Guides Association, Malaysia) has become one of the leading movements in the country and has gained particular recognition for its contribution towards unifying the various racial groups in Malaysia’s multiracial society.

The Girl Guides Association of Malaya became an Associate Member of WAGGGS in 1960. In 1963 the new country of Malaysia was inaugurated and in December 1964 the Girl Guides Association of Sabah and Sarawak joined the Association.

Maldives – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name:  Maldives Girl Guide Association

 

Age Groups with names

Service Guide 17-25

Guide 12-16+

Little Maid (Brownie) 7-12

Stars 5-6

 

Members: 9474

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Guide Movement was introduced to the Maldives in 1962. It was initiated by the Principal of Aminiya School, who was the first Sri Lanka Chief Commissioner in the Sri Lankan Girl Guide Association. The first Guide company was started in Aminiya School, and Guide leaders were from the Maldives, India, Sri Lanka and the UK. The UK programme was followed and the language used was English. Early in 1967, six Guides participated in the Golden Jubilee Camp in Colombo organized by the Sri Lankan Girl Guide Association, but at the time there was no formal structure to the organization.

Guiding was revived when the Under Secretary, Education, and Commissioner of the Association, took over and organized the Movement in 1984. A full-time Commissioner for Training was appointed. The Association was registered, and the Executive Committee formed. In 1984, Guiding was introduced into private schools and there were camps and leadership training on the islands.

The Junior Branch of the Brownies (now Little Maids) was started in 1986. The first Senior Guide Company, the Rangers (now Service Guides) started at the Youth Centre in 1987. In the same year, Leadership training began for the Teacher trainees at the Institute for Teacher Trainees (now Faculty of Education). This programme still continues. The Star programme for five and six year olds started in May 2000.

The National Headquarters of The Maldives Girl Guide Association is housed at the Ministry of Education.

Malta – Europe Region

Organisation name: The Malta Girl Guides Association (MGGA)

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 14-18

Guide 10-14

Brownie 7-10

Dolphin 5-7

 

Members: 1130

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding was first introduced to Malta in 1918 when companies of British Guides were formed. In 1923 some Maltese girls became Guides and formed a separate division; the two divisions merged in 1938 to form a single body, the Malta Girl Guides Association, although there were still companies of British Guides. Malta gained independence in 1964 and Guiding activities continued to gain strength.

In 1974 Malta became a republic and four years later the British Guides companies left the island. The Association changed its name in 1984 to become the Girl Guides Association – Malta.

The Association is open to girls of every class, race, religion and nationality. It has a good relationship with the Scouts. Guides with special needs are encouraged to join local groups. In 1985 a pre-Brownie Programme known as the Dolphin Guide Programme was launched. The aim of the programme is ‘Socialisation through play’

Marshall Islands

See Girl Scouts USA

Martinique

See Guides de France

Mauritania – Arab Region

Organisation name: Association Scouts et Guides de Mauritanie

 

Age Groups with names

Jawalatte (Ranger) 18-25

Mouchidatte (Guide) 12-17

Zaharatte (Brownie) 8-11

 

Members: 500

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding was introduced in 1986 by a group of women leaders who got their inspiration from the Scout Movement, which had been operational since 1946. The first Brownie and Guide companies were opened in Nouakchott, the capital, and later extended to the other districts. Today the Movement is active in seven provinces.

The Association has benefited from support given by the Arab Girl Guide Assembly, the World Bureau, WAGGGS and Les Guides de France.

The General Assembly is the policy-making body of the Association and it meets every four years, presided by the Chairman.

The National Council implements the decision of the General Assembly, and is responsible for managing the Association. The Executive Council oversees the functions of Regions and the implementation of programmes, and meets regularly. The Guide Committee, headed by the Guide Commissioner, is responsible for addressing specific issues that concern girls and young women.

The Association does not have a headquarters, and uses the premises granted to it by the Ministry of Youth and Sport.

Mauritius – Africa Region

Organisation name: The Mauritius Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 15-20

Girl Guide 11-15

Bluebird 7-11

 

Members: 935

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding began in Vacoas, Mauritius, in 1926 with the formation of a company for English-speaking girls. French-speaking girls later joined the company, and Guiding soon spread to other areas of the country, although membership was confined to girls of European descent.

In 1939 the Anglican community opened Companies which admitted girls of all nationalities, and soon afterwards similar companies were opened by the Roman Catholic community.

In 1943 the first Island Council was formed and in 1946 the Mauritius Girl Guides Association’s constitution was approved and it became a Branch Association of the Guide Association (UK). Guiding in Mauritius continued to spread and, with the assistance of trainers from the United Kingdom, was established in five of the seven districts on the island. In 1980 a bill was passed by the Mauritius Legislative Assembly granting the Association legal status.

Guiding today has reached rural areas and schools and is open to all races and religions of the island. In 1990 Guiding was extended to Rodrigues Island

Mayotte

See Guides de France

Mexico – Western Hemisphere

Organisation name: Guias De Mexico, A.C.

 

Age Groups with names

Guía Mayor (Ranger) 15-18

Guía Intermedia (Intermediate) 13-15

Guía (Guide) 9-13

Hadita (Fairy) 6-9

Girasol (Sunflower) 4-6

 

Members: 2514

Monaco - Europe

Organisation name: Association des Guides et Scouts de Monaco (AGSM)

 

Age Groups with names (Local Name and English Language Equivalent

Guide Aînée (Ranger) 16-20+

Guide/Scout (Guide/Scout) 12-16

Louvette/ (Brownie)/Louveteau (Cub Scout) 7-12

 

Members: 23

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Guide company in Monaco was formed in 1929, and Guiding developed under the auspices of the Guides de France. In 1953 work began on forming an independent Association which was achieved in 1956.

Mongolia – Asia Pacific

Organisation name: Girl Scout Association of Mongolia

 

Age Groups with names

Girls age of 5-7 compose the “Yargui “ branch of GSAM

Girls age of 8-11 compose the “Borolzgono” branch

Girls age of 12-15 compose the “Guide” branch

Girls age of 16-18 compose the “Sarnai” branch

 

Members: 1500

Montserrat

Scouting and Guiding in Montserrat exist as branches of the parent organisations in the United Kingdom.

Girlguiding Montserrat (formerly Montserrat Girl Guide Association) is a Guiding organization in Montserrat. It is one of the nine branch associations of Girlguiding UK. It is represented by Girlguiding UK at World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) level and Girlguiding UK's Chief Guide is also Chief Guide for Girlguiding Montserrat. Girlguiding Montserrat is part of the Caribbean Link for Guiding.

The program is a modified form of Guiding in the United Kingdom, adapted to suit local conditions, with the same promise, and Rainbow, Brownie, Guide and Ranger groups.

An eruption of Mount Soufrière in 1997 destroyed the Guide Headquarters on Montserrat. It had been open less than ten years. In 2007, the rebuilding of Headquarters began using money raised by Girl Guides and Brownies in the north-east of England.

Myanmar

Myanmar Girl Guides (MMGG)

 

Girl Guiding ceased in the Union of Burma in 1962. Although Scouting was abolished by the then government, Girl Guiding was never abolished but Guiding activities stopped around 1962-1963. In December 2012, approximately 50 years later, the Asia Pacific Regional Committee received an invitation from YMCA Myanmar through the assistance of Girl Scouts of Japan (GSJ), to meet with the Myanmar Ministry of Education officials to discuss on re-starting Girl Guiding and Scouting activities in schools. Representatives from Myanmar Girl Guides attended the 11th Asia Pacific Regional Conference in Tokyo, Japan in July 2013 and Myanmar Girl Guides (MMGG) was awarded with the Certificate of Country Working Towards Membership (CWTM).

Namibia – Africa Region

Organisation name: The Girl Guides Association of Namibia

 

Age Groups with names

Young Leader 18 - adult

Ranger 15-18

Guide 11-15

Brownie 7-11

 

Members: 1680

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding was established in the Territory of South West Africa (known as Namibia since 1968) in 1923 as a Region of the Girl Guides Association of South Africa. During the years 1985 to 1990 when the political independence of Namibia was being discussed by the world community, the Girl Guides Association of South Africa assisted the region of Namibia in its preparation to become an independent organization. In 1990 when Namibia became an independent sovereign country, the Girl Guides Association of Namibia was established. In 1993, the national organization became an Associate Member of WAGGGS. In 1999 the Girl Guides Association of Namibia was granted Full Membership of the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts. The national headquarters are based in Windhoek, the capital of Namibia. Since then, the Association has worked steadily towards the development of its own structure and the namibianisation of its programme. In 2003, a new structure was approved and the Association has since worked towards the realization of that structure.

 

In 2007 the revised Constitution was approved by WAGGGS. This was followed by the revision of the Terms of Reference which details the leadership profiles of the Association. In December 2008, the Training Scheme was accredited by WAGGGS. Attention has been given to the training of young guide leaders as the future leaders of the Association. Several young guide leaders have recently attended JLS seminars, as well as Trainings for Trainers and Co-operative Workshops of the South South Partnership. They have also been part of the delegations to Africa Region meetings and to World Conferences. The value of these experiences has already been shown in the Association.

Nepal – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Girl Scout Section of Nepal Scouts

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 16-25

Girl Scout 11-16

Brownie 6-11

 

Members: 22061

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The late HM the King Tribhuvan Bir Bikram Shah Deva established the Nepal Scouts and Guides Association in 1952. In 1959, His Royal Highness Crown Prince Birendra Bir Bikram Shah Dev was appointed and invested as Chief Scout by His Majesty King Mahendra Bir Bikram Shah Dev at the Royal Palace. Since then, celebrating Scout Day at the Royal Palace has become a tradition. On the same day, the Chief Scout inaugurated the National Headquarters of the Nepal Scouts and Guides. In 1965, the name of the Association was changed to Nepal Boy and Girl Scouts Association. From then onwards the Girl Guides were known as Girl Scouts. In 1975 the name was further changed to the Nepal Scouts.

 

After the declaration of Republic of Nepal, amended constitution of Nepal Scouts defined the provision of Patron to Primer Minister and Chief Scouts to Youth and Sports Minister.

 

A five-year development plan was first introduced in 1975, and the first National Jamboree was held in 1987 with the theme ‘Let‘s make the world beautiful’.

Rallies and community-centred social service by Nepal Scouts are organized jointly by Scouts and Guides. Leadership training, camping, District Camporees, and other relevant aspects of the youth programme are held separately by the national development service, as required under the education system of the country.

Currently, in the Nepal Scouts, the departmental head of the Girls Section is Joint Chief Commissioner. Below this, there is an International Commissioner (Girls), Training Commissioner (Girls), National Organizing Commissioner (Girls), National Programme Commissioner, National PR Commissioner, and other office personnel.

Netherlands – Europe Region

Organisation name: Scouting Nederland

 

Age Groups with names

Jongerentak/ Sea Ranger/ 17-21
Loods /Ranger Sherpa, Matroos/ (Senior Guide), 14-17
Astronaut Sea/Air Senior Padvindster Gids, (Guide), 10-15
Zeeverkenner/ Sea/Air Luchtverkenner (Guide)

Kabouter/Esta (Brownie) 7-11

Bever (Beaver) 5-7

 

Members: 53796

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Guide groups appeared in the Netherlands in 1911. In 1916 six of these groups formed Het Nederlandse Meisjes Gilde, which in 1928 was a Founder Member of WAGGGS. The Association changed its name to Het Nederlandse Padvindsters Gilde in 1933.

After the Second World War there were two Guide Associations active in the Netherlands: Het Nederlandse Padvindsters Gilde, which was partially sponsored by the Ecumenical Council of Youth and the Salvation Army; and De Nederlandse Gidsen, which catered to Roman Catholic girls. These two Associations were represented in WAGGGS by a joint council, the Nationale Padvindsters Raad.

In 1967 the Federation Scouting Nederland was formed as a result of the growing co-operation between the Nationale Padvindsters Raad and the Scouting Association for boys. Since 1973 there has been one organization for girls and boys, Scouting Nederland, which combines elements from all former associations and remains open to new developments. HRH Prince Claus is patron of this merged organization.

Netherlands Antilles – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Asosiashon di Guia PNA

 

Age Groups with names

Pionier (Ranger) 17+

Senior Padvindster (Senior Guide) 13-17

Junior Padvindster (Junior Guide) 10-13

Kabouter (Brownie) 7-10

Elvita (Pre-Brownie) 4-6

 

Members: 255

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Guide company in the Netherlands Antilles was opened in Curaçao in May 1930 by one of the Component Associations of The Netherlands, Het Nederlandse Padvindsters Gilde. Soon afterwards the Association became the Nederlandse Padvindstergilde Curaçao, and in the following years Guiding continued to grow with assistance in programme and training developments from Het Nederlandse Padvindsters Gilde. In 1967 Het Nederlandse Padvindsters Gilde requested WAGGGS and the Western Hemisphere Committee to work directly with the Nederlandse Padvindstergilde Curaçao in order to forge links with National Organizations in the same geographical area. In 1972 the Nederlandse Padvindstergilde Curaçao became an independent Association.

The name of the Association was changed to the Padvindstersvereniging van de Nederlandse Antillen in 1977. Guiding has spread to all areas of the island of Curaçao and to all sectors of the community. Following the objective to increase membership, the Association started in May 1993 with girls in the 4-6 years age group. They are called ”Elvita“, which name honours Mrs Norma Elisabeth-Galaraga who was the first Guide who made her Promise after Guiding was introduced on the island. The Elvita programme consists of songs, games, stories and crafts especially for this age group. In 1995, the Association expanded to the island of Bonaire, starting with the Pre-Brownie and Brownie sections.

In 2014, during the 35th WAGGGS World Conference in Hong Kong the association changed name to Asosiashon di Guia PNA.

New Caledonia

See Guides de France

New Zealand – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Girlguiding New Zealand

 

Age Groups with names

Pippins 5-6 years

Brownies 7-9 ½ years

Guides 9 ½ -Year 9

Rangers Year 9-18 years

 

Members: 13220

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

GirlGuiding New Zealand was incorporated in 1923 from the Girl Peace Scouts, which started in 1908. In 1928 GirlGuiding New Zealand became a founder member of WAGGGS. Despite competition from a huge range of leisure and sporting activities, Guiding remains popular.

GirlGuiding New Zealand is interpreted in the New Zealand Maori language as Nga Kohine Whakamahiri o Aotearoa. GirlGuiding New Zealand has a policy of including Maori (an official language of Aotearoa New Zealand) in headings in its printed materials, as part of its move towards fuller recognition of the 1840 Treaty of Waitangi between Maori, who are the first people (or tangata whenua) of New Zealand, and the people of many other nations who have settled in New Zealand in the last three centuries.

Nicaragua – Western Hemisphere

Organisation name: Federación Nacional De Muchachas Guías De Nicaragua

 

Age Groups with names

Senior Guide 16-18

Guide 10-15

Fairy 7-9

 

Members: 2213

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Nicaragua began in 1940, when a well-known Nicaraguan educator opened a Guide company in a school in Managua. Progress was slow, but by 1972 the Movement had spread to four departments and the National Committee was considering applying for Associate Membership in WAGGGS. Unfortunately Guiding was brought to a standstill when an earthquake destroyed Managua.

In 1976, with the assistance of the trainer/adviser for the Western Hemisphere Region, the National Committee was re-established and Guide companies and Brownie packs re-opened. The Association received legal recognition in 1977, and despite civil disturbances in the country during 1978 and 1979, the National Council and leaders continued their work.

When the situation improved, vacancies on the council were filled and a full-time trainer was appointed with financial assistance from WAGGGS. Guiding is now established throughout the country.

Nigeria – Africa Region

Organisation name: The Nigerian Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Leader 18+

Ranger and Cadet 16-18

Guide 10-16

Brownie 6-10

Sunbeam 4-5+

 

Members: 120000

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Girl Guide company in Nigeria was formed in 1919 and before long companies were started in several schools in different parts of the country. Four years later, a committee of interested people was set up to encourage and direct the work of the rapidly spreading Movement. This committee, then known as the Central Nigeria Executive Committee, later became the Council of the Nigerian Girl Guides Association.

The first Brownie pack was registered in 1927, and in 1929 a company was formed in a lepers’ hospital. Ranger companies first appeared in Nigeria in 1934 and the further expansion of Girl Guiding led to the formation of Cadet companies. Girl Guiding quickly spread to all parts of the country and numbers increased rapidly.

The Nigerian Girl Guides Association’s new three storey building serves as the National Headquarters. It also houses a New Day Care Centre, the Guide Shop and a Conference Hall. The third floor is a transit hostel.

The Government donated over 13 hectares of land at Abuja, the national capital, for the use of the Association and the proposed 5th World Centre. This choice site is still waiting to be developed.

The Association celebrated its 80th anniversary with pomp and pageantry in 1999.

Northern Mariana Islands

See USA

Norway – Europe Region

Organisation name: Speidernes Fellesorganisasjon (SF)

 

Members: 11792

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guides were active in Norway before the First World War and the oldest companies have records dating from 1912, although it was not until 1920 that the first national organization was formed, Norges KFUK-Speidere (YWCA Guides of Norway). A year later Norsk speiderpikeforbund (Norwegian Girl Guides Association) was formed.

In 1978 Norsk speiderpikeforbund merged with Norsk Speiderguttforbund for boys to become Norges speiderforbund (the Norwegian Guide and Scout Association).

Members of Norges KFUK-Speidere, and all female members of Norges speiderforbund, are represented in WAGGGS by Fellesrådet for Speiderpiker i Norge (the Joint Committee of Girl Guides in Norway).

Norges KFUK-KFUM-Speidere (KFUK-KFUM)

Norges Speiderforbund (NSF)

 

Organisation name: Norges KFUK-KFUM-Speidere (KFUK-KFUM)

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger (Ranger) 16+

Vandere Guide 13-15

Stifinner Guide 10-12

Meiser (Brownie) 7-9

Harer (Hare) 6-7

 

Organisation name: Norges Speiderforbund (NSF)

 

Age Groups with names (Local Name and English Language Equivalent

Rovere (Ranger) 16+

Speidere (Guide) 10-15

Småspeidere (Brownie) 7-9

Bevere (Beaver) 6-7

Oman – Arab Region

Organisation name: The Scouts and Guides of Oman

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 17-24

Guide 12-17

Brownie 7-12

 

Members: 2600

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Brownie packs and Guide companies were opened in elementary and intermediate schools in Muscat, the capital of Oman, in 1972. Guiding soon spread to other parts of the country, and the National Organization for Scouts and Guides was established by Royal Decree in 1975.

The Omani Scout and Guide Organizations constitute the National Organization for Scouts and Guides. The two wings operate independently, but both have their headquarters in the same building in Muscat.

Pakistan – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Pakistan Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Senior Guide 16-21

Guide 11-16

Junior Guide 6-11

 

Members: 110826

 

How Guiding started in the Country

Girl Guides have been active in the area which is now Pakistan since 1911. In 1928 this area, along with that of present-day India and Bangladesh, became a Founder Member of WAGGGS under the name of India.

In 1948, the Pakistan Girl Guides Association was welcomed as a separate member of WAGGGS.

The Association’s National Headquarters and Training Centre was opened in Islamabad in 1974. It provides training to Guides, trainers and adult members of the Association, besides national events for Guides and Senior Guides.

In 1983 Guiding was extended to Gilgit and Hunza in the north of the country.

Palau

See USA

Panama – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name:

 

Age Groups with names

Cadete (Cadet) 17-19

Guía Mayor (Ranger) 15-17

Guía Intermedia / (B Guide) 12-14

Guía Intermedia / (A Guide) 10-12

Alita (Little Wing) 7-9

Chavelita 4 -6

 

Members: 1026

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in the Republic of Panama began in 1950 when an Association was formed.

Papua New Guinea – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Girl Guides Association of Papua New Guinea

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 16-22

Guide 11-16

Brownie 7-11

 

Members: 3410

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Guide company in Papua New Guinea was started in Hanuabada Village near Port Moresby in 1927 by a missionary. Soon afterwards, other companies were established in the villages of Hula and Delena, and in 1933 the first Ranger company was opened.

The first Guide company in New Guinea began in 1939 when membership of the Movement totalled 120. Between 1942 and 1945 Guiding ceased to function but resumed in 1946 with a Ranger company. Companies and packs then began to appear in several villages, organized by former Guides.

The Federal Council of the Girl Guides Association of Australia included the Girl Guides of Papua New Guinea as a division in 1948. A local Association was formed and a president appointed. The following year saw the appointment of a Territory Commissioner for the Association. In 1955 it was recognized as a branch of the Girl Guides Association of Australia, and in the following year a constitution was prepared and accepted.

In 1976 the Papua New Guinea Association became independent of Australia and a new constitution was introduced.

Paraguay – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Asociación Guías Scouts Del Paraguay

 

Age Groups with names

Mayor (Ranger) 14-18

Guide Mediodía (Noon) 12-13

Amanecer (Dawn) 10-11

Alita (Little Wing) 6-9

 

Members: 178

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first group of Girl Scouts in Paraguay, formed in 1923, was known as the Girl Scouts Brigade. The Association continued to develop until it was abolished in 1938.

Girl Scouting was reintroduced to Paraguay in 1959 when two separate initiatives were taken to establish activities. A group of Girl Scouts was started at the Escuela Normal Rural of San Lorenzo, and, at the same time, a training course for leaders was organized and participants later opened three Girl Scout companies.

After a visit to Paraguay by the Travelling Commissioner for the Western Hemisphere, a committee was set up, and in 1960 the Asociación de Niñas Guías Paraguayas was established.

In 1962 the Association, renamed the Asociación Guías Scouts del Paraguay, received official recognition from the Government

Peru – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Asociación Nacional De Guías Scouts Del Perú

 

Age Groups with names

Guía de Servicio (Service Guide) 18-25

Guía Mayor (Ranger) 13-18

Guía Intermedia (Guide) 10-13

Alita (Fairy) 7-10

 

Members: 2780

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girl Guiding/Girl Scouting has existed in Peru since 1916, but it was not until 1945 that the National Association was set up under the sponsorship of the Ministry of Education. With the help of the WAGGGS Travelling Commissioner for the Western Hemisphere, activities were reorganized in 1953 and an autonomous Association was formed which was officially recognized by the Ministry of Education and chartered by Congress.

Phillipines – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Girl Scouts of the Philippines (GSP)

 

Age Groups with names

Cadet Scout 15-21

Senior Scout 12-15

Junior Scout 9-12

Star Scout 6-9

Twinkler Scout 4-6

 

Members: 692629

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girl Scouting in the Philippines began as early as 1918 with GSUSA troops organized by American Missionaries, but it was not until 1939 that the Girl Scout Movement was formally launched following GSP Founder Josefa Llanes Escoda's arrival from an intensive Girl Scout training in the USA. In 1940 the Girl Scouts of the Philippines was chartered as a national organization.

The first national Girl Scouts' rally and the first leaders' training conference were held in 1941, and during the Second World War, although the Association suspended its activities, Girl Scout leaders committed themselves to service to victims and prisoners of war. After the war, the leaders set about rebuilding the Association and received much public support.

The National Council Convention, held every three years, is the Association's highest consultative and deliberative body which serves as a forum for guidelines, policies and directions. It is represented by a 37-member Central Board which is elected as the policy-making body that meets semi-annually. The National Officers and Chairmen of Standing Committees make up the Executive Committee which takes care of the day-to-day governance together with the technical staff.

Poland – Europe Region

Organisation name: Zwiazek Harcerstwa Polskiego (ZHP)

 

Age Groups with names (Local Name and English Language Equivalent

Harcerki starsze Ranger 15+

Harcerki Guide 11-15

Zuchy Brownie 7-11

 

Members: 49304

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Polish Guiding started in 1910, with a troop in Lwów, at the same time as the first two Polish Boy Scout troops were established. In January 1913, a Guide section was created within the Headquarters of Polish Scouting and Guiding. Guiding increased throughout Poland which at that time was still partitioned among Austria, Prussia and Russia. Parts of Poland were under German and Russian rule, where Guiding was not allowed and so Guiding had to operate in secret. When the First World War broke out in 1914, contacts between regions became difficult because fighting was taking place on Polish territory, and a special Guide authority was established in Warsaw. Throughout this period, before and during the First World War, Polish Guides co-operated actively with all those who worked and fought for the independence of Poland.

A new epoch for Polish Guiding and Scouting began when, after the First World War, Poland became independent again, and the war with communist Russia was won. In 1918, the nationwide organization Polish Guiding and Scouting Association (ZHP) was formally established.

In 1920, ZHP was represented at the 1st World Conference in Oxford and representatives of Polish Guides have attended World Conferences of Girl Scouts and Girl Guides since then. ZHP was a Founder Member of WAGGGS. The first national Guide Jamboree took place in 1924.

The year 1930 brought about a great change: a decision was made to establish within ZHP separate Guide and Scout Organizations, both with their own authorities at all levels. The Guide leaders created their own monthly paper called Wings which played a very important role in Polish Guiding.

In 1932, the Bucze Training School for Guide Leaders was organized in Silesia, and in the summer of that year the 7th World Conference took place in Poland, with Lady Baden-Powell among the many delegates attending.

When the Second World War broke out, many ZHP leaders left the country to continue Guiding/Scouting activity among emigré youth. The Guiding/ Scouting communities which remained in the Nazi-occupied country formed an underground organization linked to the Home Army. ‘Trefoil Union’ was one of the underground cryptonyms of the Guide Association and became well known, earning high respect from Polish society. Guides helped the weak, the poor, the homeless and children in need in different ways, and they participated in the Resistance Movement all over Poland.

When in 1944 the Red Army and the Polish Army advanced into Polish territory, the new communist regime was gradually established. Guiding became increasingly difficult to practise due to political pressure and finally, in 1950, ZHP was suspended and an organization for children with a few elements taken from Guiding and Scouting was organized in schools. Its name was ‘Scout and Guide Organization’, not ‘Pioneer’ as in other Central and Eastern European countries. Poland resigned its membership of WAGGGS in 1950.

After the political changes of 1956, ZHP was re-established, and many former Guide and Scout leaders returned to rebuild Polish Guiding and Scouting as a co-educational merged organization, not a joint one as before. But this traditional model was to survive for only a few years, as ZHP was gradually turned into a mass children’s organization, increasingly permeated by communist indoctrination. The years between 1960-1980 were difficult because of a strong influence of the Communist Party on the Association, but a number of troops preserved the best Guide and Scout traditions.

After facing years of difficulty, the laws concerning associations in Poland changed and ZHP decided, at its Congress at Bydgoszcz in 1990, to return fully to traditional values and methods, and worked intensively towards returning to both Guide and Scout World Organizations. The final part of this process was the Extraordinary Congress of ZHP on 10 June 1995, which amended the Association’s Statutes, making them fully compatible with the requirements of WAGGGS.

ZHP has good contacts with many European Associations, some with a long tradition – more than 25 years. ZHP has hosted, and attended many European events.

Portugal – Europe Region

Organisation name: Associação Guias De Portugal (AGP)

 

Age Groups with names

Guia Moinho – (Windmill Guide) 17-21

Guia Caravela – (Caravelle Guide) 14-17

Guia Aventura – (Adventure Guide) 10-14

Avezinha –(Little Bird) 6-10

 

Members: 3038

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Portugal began in 1920’s decade, when the first companies were started in Oporto. The Movement later spread to Lisbon and in 1931 Brownie packs and Guide units were established on the Island of Madeira.

The Association became a recognized national Movement in 1934, but by 1937 all Guiding activities had been suspended because of political unrest. Only the Island of Madeira was able to keep the flame alive, which helped the Association resume activities in 1954. In 1960, the Association received the Girl Guides World Chief and in 1975, during the 22nd World Conference in England, became an effective member of WAGGGS.

Puerto Rico

Girl Scouting in Puerto Rico is administered by the Caribe Girl Scout Council of the Girl Scouts of the USA. It is headquartered in San Juan. The first troop was formed in 1926 in Cabo Rojo by Elisa Colberg.  The Spanish translation of Girl Scout is Niña Escucha but it is also widely understood and used in English in Puerto Rico.

Qatar – Arab Region

Organisation name: The Scout and Guide Association of Qatar

 

Members: 3480

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Girl Guides Association of Qatar was formed in 1995 after issuing a draft law to organize the Association. Brownie packs were set up in elementary schools, Girl Guide groups in preparatory schools and advanced Girl Guiding in secondary schools. By 1997, the Association had taken long and qualitative strides and had been generalised in all sectors of education. New leaders’ training was based on gradual promotion of leadership and producing inspectors to ensure high standards of Girl Guiding and Girl Scouting. The movement in Qatar has continued to increase in members and the programme level remains high and relevant to the needs of girls and young women.

Reunion

See Guides de France

Romania – Europe Region

Organisation name: Asociatia Ghidelor si Ghizilor Din Romania (AGGR)

 

Age Groups with names

Adventurer 18-25

Senior 14-18

Guide 11-14

Flower 7-11

 

Members: 1195

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girl Guiding existed in Romania between 1928 and 1938 but activities then ceased and contact was lost. In 1989, following political change in Romania, and on the initiative of Girl Guiding friends in Greece, a group of friends interested in giving service to the community formed a committee to start Girl Guiding in the country.

The Asociatia Fetelor Ghizi din Romania (The Association of Girl Guides of Romania) was set up in 1990 and became a corporate body on 1 March 1991.

During 1990-1993, representatives of the Greek Girl Guides Association and WAGGGS lent a hand to the newborn Association, offering support in order to introduce them to Girl Guiding, to set up a structure, and to train leaders.

1995 was an important year in the development of Guiding in Romania when the Swiss Guide and Scout Movement (MSdS) and the Romanian Guides Association initiated a partnership project with the aim of helping the Romanian Guide Association to become a full member of WAGGGS by 2005. The main objectives of this project are to update the constitution of the Association; to create a new training scheme; to create and implement a new educational programme; to improve the image of Guiding in Romanian society; and to increase membership.

Since 1998, boys and men have been accepted as members of the Association. The Association has centres in various parts of Romanian including Iasi, Cluj Napoca, Valcea, Timis, Maramures.

Struggling hard with the economic situation and the old mentality, following half a century of totalitarian rule, Guiding is developing little by little in the country.

Russia – Europe Region

Organisation name: Rossiskaya Assotsiatsia Devochek Skautov (RADS)

 

Age Groups with names

Junior Girl Scout 6-9

Girl Scout 10-13

Senior Girl Scout 14-18

Leader 18+

 

Members: 1997

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Scouting developed across many areas of Russia relatively quickly, perhaps as early as 1909. There are records of girl patrols in a range of towns from this time onwards, but there was no national girls’ organization.

Scouting was banned in 1919, and the Young Pioneers became the official state youth organization. Many units continued to exist unofficially, but all had ceased by the mid 1920s.

Scouting returned in the years of perestroika. Many international contacts were made with foreign visits and aid offered as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. There was much interest on an international level in bringing Scouting back to Russia.

In 1991 FSR (Federation of Scouts of Russia) was created and almost immediately there was discussion on a programme specifically for girls. In 1993 in Perm the founding conference of the League of Girl Scouts of FSR took place. The girls’ programme and Movement developed, and in 1994 in October in Perm the next step was taken as the Russian Association of Girl Scouts had its founding conference. Representatives of WAGGGS and Girl Scout leaders from across the country (including other Scouting organizations as well as FSR) were present. A national board was elected and RADS as it is known today was established.

In 1996 RADS had its first National Girl Scout camp, and its biannual conference met again in Perm. The structure of the Association was altered slightly for more efficient management and expansion. All through the revival of Girl Scouting in Russia and the formation of RADS, much support in many forms was given by the UK as link country.

RADS today has the special challenge of continuing to build a national association in the largest country on earth. Russia contains many nationalities and ethnic groups, and this regional diversity is visible in RADS too.

Rwanda – Africa Region

Organisation name: Association des Guides du Rwanda

 

Age Groups with names

Eclaireuse (Girl Scout)

Senior Girl Guide 17+

Guide (Guide) 13-16

Bergeronnette (Wagtail) 6-12

 

Members: 12492

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Rwanda began in 1962 with the help of members of the Guides Catholiques de Belgique, but, through lack of support from local leaders, interest in the Movement dwindled after independence later that year. In 1967 Guiding was revived as a branch of the Scout Association.

The Girl Guides set up their own organization, the Fédération des Guides du Rwanda, in 1972, with a national team responsible for administration. The Federation was composed of two Associations, the Association des Guides Catholiques and the Association des Guides Protestantes.

A proposal was made in 1974 to form a single Association, and this idea was accepted two years later by the first National Assembly. In 1977 the Constitution was accepted at a general meeting, a permanent national team was appointed, and a work plan was drawn up. The Association des Guides du Rwanda received official government recognition in 1980.

Saint Helena (Europe Region)

Girlguiding Saint Helena (formerly the Saint Helena Girl Guide Association) is a Guiding organization in Saint Helena and Ascension Island. It is one of the nine branch associations of Girlguiding UK. It is represented by Girlguiding UK at World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) level and Girlguiding UK's Chief Guide is also Chief Guide for Girlguiding Saint Helena.

In 2008, there were about 70 Girl Guides on Saint Helena.

Saint Kitts and Nevis – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: The Girl Guides Association of St Christopher and Nevis

 

Age Groups with names (Local Name and English Language Equivalent

Ranger 16-18

Guide 11-15

Brownie 7-10

 

Members: 158

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Until 1991 the Girl Guides Association of St Christopher (St Kitts) and the Girl Guides Association of St Nevis were two separate Branch Associations of the Guide Association (UK). The Movement was introduced in St Christopher in 1931 when four Guide groups were opened in Basseterre. Guiding in Nevis started at the instigation of a teacher from the United Kingdom. The first Ranger company was opened in 1963.

Over the years, with the help of trainers from the Guide Association (UK), the Girl Guides Associations of St Kitts and of Nevis worked hard to establish themselves in larger towns and some of the villages. In 1989 the two Associations decided to become Members of WAGGGS and, as a first step, worked towards becoming one National Organization. In 1991 the Guide Association (UK) sealed a Deed of Transfer making both Branch Associations independent, and at the 60th Jubilee celebrations of the Girl Guides Association of St Christopher the two Associations joined to become one entity.

Saint Lucia – Western Hemisphere

Organisation name: Girl Guides Association of St Lucia

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 15-19+

Guide 10-16

Brownie Guide 7-11

Margurette 6-7

 

Members: 961

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Guide company in Saint Lucia was started in the capital, Castries, in 1925. In 1926 the Association was registered as a Branch Association of the Guide Association (UK). In 1984, the Association was accepted by WAGGGS as an Associate Member.

During the early years the headquarters moved several times until, in 1931, the Government gave the Association two rooms in the lodge at the botanical gardens in Castries. Building improvements began with a ceremony in 1964 during a visit from the World Chief Guide and work was completed in 1965.  In 1979 Saint Lucia became politically independent and in October 1983 the Guide Association (UK) signed a Deed of Transfer making the Girl Guides Association of Saint Lucia self-governing in all areas of work.

Saint Pierre and Miquelon

See France

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Girl Guides Association of St Vincent and the Grenadines

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 16-19

Guide 10 -16

Brownie Guide 7-11

Bim-Bim 5-7

 

Members: 2066

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding was first introduced in Saint Vincent in 1914 by a Methodist Minister from England and Guide companies were established in Georgetown and neighbouring South Rivers. Unfortunately the Movement became dormant in the area after the First World War but was restarted again in 1927 in the capital, Kingstown, the new company being registered at Commonwealth Headquarters (UK) in 1928.

Guiding spread to other towns and later to villages; the first Brownie and Ranger units were started in 1931. By 1934 the Movement had spread to the Grenadines island of Bequia. The Association welcomed the World Chief Guide Lady Baden-Powell to St Vincent on two occasions – in 1951 and again in 1964.

In 1983 the Guide Association (UK) signed a deed of transfer giving the Girl Guides Association of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines self-government in all areas of work

San Marino – Europe Region

Organisation name: Associazione Guide Espolratori Cattolici Sammarinesi (AGECS)

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 16-21

Guide 12-15

Brownie 7-11

 

Members: 98

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

When Boy Scouting was introduced to San Marino in 1973, the benefits the Movement offered to young people were apparent. With the help of the Associazione Guide E Scouts Cattolici Italiani (AGESCI) a Girl Guide unit, made up of a Guide Patrol and a Brownie Circle, was opened in 1974. Soon after, the merged Association, now known as Associazione Guide Esploratori Cattolici Sammarinesi (AGECS) was set up. From 1974 to 1987 all Guides were part of WAGGGS through AGESCI, paying their quota to WAGGGS through the Italian Association.

Guiding continued to grow, and in 1976 a mixed Ranger/Rover group was opened and in 1977 the Brownies and Cubs joined together to form a mixed group. In 1987 an Agreement of Co-operation was signed between AGESCI and AGECS allowing AGECS members to wear AGESCI uniform, use its publications, and follow its training programme. Expansion in San Marino continued with more units being introduced in 1988. Guiding is now found in all areas of the Republic.

Senegal – Africa Region

Organisation name: La Section Des Guides De L'Association Des Scouts et Guides Du Sénégal

 

Age Groups with names

Guide Aînée (Ranger) 16+

Guide (Guide) 12-15

Jeannette (Brownie) 7-12

 

Members: 5121

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding was started in Senegal in 1953 by former members of the Guides de France. It was intended for French girls living in Dakar and was based on the French programme. The Movement soon came to the notice of the Senegalese people, however, and a Ranger company was opened in the Ecole Normale at Rufisque, a teacher training college. Members of this company later went on to become leaders of other Guide companies.

Following Senegal’s independence in 1960, companies and packs were started for Senegalese girls in the parishes of Dakar and Thiès. The Association worked together with the Scout Association and in 1962 the National Organization of the Scouts et Guides du Sénégal was officially recognized by the Ministry of the Interior.

In 1964 Guides de France sent a trainer to Senegal for a period of three years. Under her guidance, Guiding was extended to Petit-Côte, St. Louis and Casamance. Until 1967, leadership had been undertaken by non-nationals, but in that year the first Senegalese Guide National Commissioner was appointed, and local leaders took on responsibility for Guiding.

In 1974 a national team was set up with the aim of extending Guiding to more areas of the country and concentrating on leadership training. Guiding and its objectives soon became better known in the country and as a result membership grew and the organization spread to several new areas.

Sierra Leone – Africa Region

Organisation name: The Sierra Leone Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 16+

Guide 10-16

Brownie Guide 7-10

Sunrays 4-6

 

Members: 1460

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

When Guiding was introduced to Sierra Leone in 1924 most units were attached to schools in the Freetown area. The Association, a Branch Association of the Guide Association (UK), spread to the rest of Sierra Leone with the establishment of secondary schools in provincial towns and improved communications to remote areas.

Singapore - Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Girl Guides Singapore

 

Age Groups with names

Young adult 17-33

Guide 11-17

Brownie 7-11

 

Members: 9268

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Singapore Guide company was started in 1917 at St. Mary’s Home. The Movement proved very popular and soon more companies and packs were formed, holding meetings at girls’ schools and in church halls. When war broke out in the Pacific in 1941, active Guiding ceased. The Movement was revived in 1946.

Slovakia – Europe Region

Organisation name: Slovenský Skauting (SLSK)

 

Members: 2621

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Slovak Republic, or Slovakia, is located in the heart of Europe. It was part of the Czechoslovak Republic between 1918 and 1992. Now it is an independent state.

From the start, Scouting in Czechoslovakia developed as an organization open to both boys and girls (working in separate units). The first Scout troop in Slovakia was founded in 1913. Groups of Girl Scouts began to form between 1918 and 1922 in various towns of Slovakia. In 1919 the Association of the Scouts and Guides of the Republic of Czechoslovakia, the joint organization of Czech and Slovak Guides and Scouts, was founded. The Czechoslovak Girl Scouts (and therefore Slovak Girl Scouts) joined the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts in 1928, and so became a founder member of WAGGGS.

Girl Scouting grew and progressed until 1939, the start of the Second World War, which brought with it the division of Czechoslovakia. In Slovakia, the Government banned Scouting. But the Scouting spirit survived the war and other persecutions and after the war and the 1944 national uprising, Scouting re-emerged and was recognized by the state of Czechoslovakia.

The Girl Scout Movement in Slovakia has over the last 40 years lost the opportunity to reach several generations of children and young people. In 1990, however, the Girl Scouts were once again accepted as members of WAGGGS, and Guiding began to flourish once more. In 1993, when Czechoslovakia split and became the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic, the Association applied and was recognized as two Associations. Today Slovensk´y Skauting is the Association operating in the Slovak Republic.

Slovenia – Europe Region

Organisation name: The Slovene Catholic Girl Guides and Boy Scouts Association (ZSKSS)

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger/Rover 16-20

Girl Guide/Boy Scout 11-15

Cub Guide/Cub Scout 8-10

 

Members: 4373

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Scouting in Slovenia began when Slovenia was a part of the former Kingdom of Yugoslavia. In 1922, Bosnian and Serbian Scouts attended a meeting of ‘Sokoli’ (Falcons) a political and sporting Movement of Yugoslavia and of some other European countries

Officially, the organization was founded in October 1922. The Slovene Scout Region was established in early 1923 in Ljubljana. The organization was part of the Yugoslav organization, which was a founder member of WAGGGS in 1928 and member of WOSM as well. The first Slovene Scout and Guide Camp was organized during the summer of 1923, in a Slovene alpine resort.

The Scout Organization was officially dissolved in 1941, due to the occupation regime during the Second World War. Just before the dissolution, there were 1,380 members of the Slovene Scout and Guide Organization.

However, Slovenian Scouting and Guiding continued: at first in refugee camps, and afterwards in Argentina and Canada where the Slovene refugees found their new homes. The Movement also revived among the Slovene ethnic groups in neighbouring countries: the Slovene Carinthian Scouts (in 1957) in Austria, the Slovene Scouts of Trieste (in 1951 boys and in 1958 girls), and the Slovene Scouts of Gorizia (in 1963 girls and in 1964 boys).

In 1984 Peter Lovöin joined the Scout and Guide Movement and decided to start Scouting and Guiding in the Slovene capital Ljubljana. In 1985 he went to camp with the Scouts of Gorizia and in 1986 he made the Scout Promise as one of them. In the same year, he gathered a group of young people round him in one of the parishes of Ljubljana.

The group was growing, and in the autumn of 1988 moved to another parish of Ljubljana. At St. George’s festival in 1989, 12 boys and girls made the Scout Promise.

With the new school year, four Patrols were established. They enthusiastically lived the Scout and Guide ideal, and the Scout and Guide Movement began to spread all over Slovenia.

On 31 March 1990, the Slovenian Catholic Girl Guides and Boy Scouts Association (ZSKSS) was officially founded. The first legal Scout/Guide Promises were made by 29 Girl Guides and Boy Scouts in a suburb of Ljubljana on 20 May, 1990.

Solomon Islands – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Solomon Islands Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 18-20

Guide 12-18

Brownie 7-11

 

Members: 697

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Guide company in the Solomon Islands was started in 1949 by a missionary teacher at a school in Santa Isabel, but the company disbanded when the teacher moved on. In 1957 the wife of the High Commissioner of the Western Pacific High Commission suggested that Guiding should be restarted in the Solomon Islands. A Commissioner was appointed and a Brownie pack soon formed.

In 1958 the first Guide company was registered with the Guide Association (UK).

After a visit by a trainer from the United Kingdom in 1963, more companies and packs were opened and handbooks, prepared with the help of the Girl Guides Association of New Zealand, were introduced.

Although Guiding has now spread to the larger islands, where the Girl Guides Association of the Solomon Islands hopes to start companies and packs in all schools, the difficulties experienced in communicating with, and travelling to, the smaller islands has hindered the development of Guiding there.

South Africa – Africa Region

Organisation name: The Girl Guides Association of South Africa

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 14-young adult

Guide 10-15

Brownie 7-10½

Teddy 4½-7

 

Members: 27449

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Guide Company in South Africa was the Hospital Hill Company, Johannesburg, which was formed by Miss Dorothy Rogers in 1910. Soon after this companies were started in Newcastle, Pietermaritzburg, Durban, King Williams Town and Cape Town.

By 1920 Guiding had spread all over South Africa and the national body was formed, known as the Girl Guides Association of South Africa. The equipment department was opened in Cape Town and the Lone and Extension Branches were started.

In 1924 the South African Girl Guide Magazine was first published. Although it ceased publication during the 1939-1945 War, it is still produced today and is entitled SA Guider.

The Girl Guides Association of South Africa, which included members in Basutoland (now Lesotho), Bechuanaland (now Botswana) and Swaziland, was a Founder Member of WAGGGS. These areas remained part of the Girl Guides Association of South Africa until 1961, but are now members of WAGGGS in their own right. Upon the independence of Namibia in 1991, another region separated to become the Girl Guides Association of Namibia.

Guiding in South Africa strives to keep abreast with modern trends by continually updating the programme and the uniform, for both girls and adults.

Spain – Europe Region

Organisation name: Comité De Enlace Del Guidismo En España (CEGE)

 

Age Groups with names

The age groups vary among the component Associations. This grouping is the most common.

Guía Mayor Ranger 16-18

Pionera Pioneer 14-16

Pionera Guide 11-14

Alita Little Wing 7-11

 

Members: 6785

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding began in San Sebastián in 1929, and soon afterwards groups of Guides appeared elsewhere in the country, including Zaragoza, Valencia and Madrid. Activities were organized and co-ordinated by the Asociación de las Guías de España.

In Catalonia Guiding started in 1932, the Germanor de Noies Guides developing along similar lines to the Asociación de las Guías de España. Guide companies were quickly formed, followed by Brownie packs and a Ranger section.

During the Civil War (1936-1939) all Guiding ceased in Spain and it was not until 1947 that activities were restarted. By 1955, Guiding had developed throughout the country and the Guides joined to form the Federación Guías de España. In 1962 the Federation was replaced by the Comité de Enlace del Guidismo en España/Comitè d’Enllaç del Guiatge a Espanya (CEGE).

From 1984 the CEGE was made up of two federations: the Federació Catalana d’Escoltisme i Guiatge, active in the Catalonian territory, and which had 7,000 members (90%); and the Federación Española de Guidismo, active in the rest of the Spaniard Estate, and which had 700 numbers (10%). The CEGE aims to maintain mutual aid and co-operation between its two federations.

Escoltes Catalans (EC)

Minyons Escoltes I Guies Sant Jordi De Catalunya (MEGSJC)

Federacion Española de Guidismo (FEG)

Federacion Catalana D'escoltisme I Guiatge (FCEG)

Sri Lanka – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: The Sri Lanka Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Senior Guides 16-23

Guides 10-17

Little Friends 7-11

 

Members: 32817

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Sri Lanka began in 1917 when the first Girl Guide company was opened in the historic hill town of Kandy. The Movement has since spread to all areas of the country, to strengthening ties between girls and young women from the country’s diverse ethnic, cultural and religious groups. The Association celebrated its 85th anniversary with a programme organised by the 1st Kandy Guide Company, the home of Guiding in the country.

Sudan – Arab Region

Organisation name: The Sudan Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Raaidat (Ranger) 16-20

Mursheda (Guide) 12-16

El Taira el Zarga (Bluebird) 7-11

 

Members: 15580

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding began in Sudan in 1928 when two companies were formed, one in an American Mission School in Atabara and the other in Khartoum. Guiding activities ceased shortly afterwards. However, they restarted some years later when people of many different nationalities worked together to promote the Movement, resulting in companies and flocks being formed in all parts of Sudan.

A headquarters was set up in Khartoum which was opened by the World Chief Guide in 1949. Following the country’s independence in 1955, the first Sudanese Chief Commissioner was appointed.

Because of the war and the difficult situation in the country, Guides concentrate their activities on the following topics: illiteracy campaigns; vaccination; mother and child care; care of the environment; handicrafts; needlework and dressmaking; winter aid; planting easy and necessary vegetables and fruits; how to live happily and peacefully with others; first aid; and home nursing. Many fundraising projects are organized, and every year a gala is held to display the girls’ work and to raise money to further Guiding.

Suriname – Western Hemisphere

Organisation name: Surinaamse Padvinsters Raad

 

Members: 323

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girl Guiding/Girl Scouting in Suriname is carried out under the auspices of Surinaamse Padvindsters Raad (Council of the Suriname Girl Scouts), which was formed in 1968 as the co-ordinating body of the two existing Associations in Suriname: Het Surinaamse Padvindsters Gilde (Surinam Association of Girl Scouts) and Gidsen Suriname (Catholic Guide Movement of Suriname). The Liaison Committee is responsible for dealing with matters which are common to both.

Het Surinaamse Padvindsters Gilde was set up in the capital, Paramaribo, in 1947 by the Nederlandse Padvinsters Gilde (an Association from the Netherlands) and subsequently spread to other areas of the country.

In 1948 Gidsen Suriname was also set up under the influence of the Dutch, and the Association co-operated with Catholic bodies in the Netherlands from the beginning: the Catholic Young Women and the Catholic Young Girls Association.

In 1954, Suriname became an independent part of the Netherlands and both organizations became self-governing in all areas of work. The country became politically independent in 1975.

 

Gidsen Suriname

Surinaamse Padvinsters Gilde

Swaziland – Africa Region

Organisation name: The Swaziland Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger/Cadet 15-21

Girl Guide 10-15

Blue Jay 7-10

 

Members: 3558

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Swaziland started in 1924, but it was only in 1950 after a visit from the World Chief Guide that it really began to spread throughout the country. In 1961 the Association was registered as a Branch Association of the Guide Association (UK). The Ranger section was organized in 1963, and a Cadet company was formed five years later in one of the two training colleges in Swaziland.

 

The Wayfarers, an organization for African girls working on similar lines to the Guide Association, was also active in Swaziland and soon joined the Guides to form one Movement for all girls in Swaziland. In 1968 girls under ten became known as Blue Jays and the following year the Guide Association (UK) signed a deed of transfer making the Swaziland Girl Guides Association self-governing in all areas

Sweden – Europe Region

Organisation name: Scouterna – The Swedish Guides and Scouts

 

Age Groups with names

Senior Guide 15-18 (called Ranger Guide by the Swedish YWCA-YMCA Guides and Scouts)

Guide 12-14

Junior Guide 10-11

Minior Guide 8-9

Beaver Guide 6-7 (not all units have Beaver Guides)

 

Members: 28546

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first groups of Guides were formed in Sweden as early as 1910, and by 1913 the foundations of Swedish Guiding had been laid.

The Swedish Guide and Scout Council (Svenska Scoutrådet)

The Council is a co-operative body for the Swedish Guide and Scout Associations. Over the years it has developed co-operative bodies for Scouting in Sweden and, after the merge to co-educational Associations, a joint committee was formed in 1968 from these two bodies – the Swedish Guide and Scout Union, with the working title The Swedish Guide and Scout Council. In 1982 the name was changed to be solely The Swedish Guide and Scout Council.

The Swedish Guide and Scout Council deal with most international matters, as well as joint questions and projects concerning the five Associations. The Council also represents Swedish Guiding and Scouting in the World Association and other member countries, as well as other organizations and authorities. It is also responsible for maintaining contact with the public and publishes the magazine ‘Redo för Scouting.’

 

Svenska Scoutförbundet (SSF)

SMU Scout (SMU-S)

Kfuk Och Kfums Scoutförbund (KFUK-KFUM)

Frälsningsarméns Scoutförbund (FA)

Nykterhetsrörelsens Scoutförbund (NSF)

 

Organisation name: Svenska Scoutförbundet (SSF)

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Swedish Guide and Scout Association is a non-political organization, open to both girls and boys. It was founded in 1912 and has approximately 66,000 members, of which about 29,000 are girls.

 

Organisation name: SMU Scout (SMU-S)

Age Groups with names

Senior Guide 16+

Tonårs Guide 13-15

Guide 10-12

Nying Guide 7-9

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Guide and Scout Organization of the Mission Covenant Youth is open to both boys and girls. It was founded in 1931 and has approximately 27,000 members, of which about 14,300 are girls. The Scout and Guide Organization is part of the activities within the youth work of the Mission Covenant Church of Sweden.

 

Organisation name: Kfuk Och Kfums Scoutförbund (KFUK-KFUM)

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

KFUK-KFUMs scoutförbund is open to both girls and boys. The YMCA-Scout Association was founded in 1911 and the YWCA-Guide Association in 1921. In 1960 they merged to form the Swedish YWCA-YMCA Guide and Scout Association. Today it has approximately 14,000 members, of which about 7,000 are girls.

The Association is one of three special associations within the Swedish YWCA-YMCA. Some of the Scout groups originate from local YWCA-YMCA groups, but many have other parent organizations. There are Baptist Scouts, Adventist Scouts, Blue-band Scouts, Methodist Scouts, Swedish Church Scouts and Swedish Evangelical Mission Scouts, although most groups are independent and not in any way associated with the local YWCA-YMCA group or with any church.

 

Organisation name: Frälsningsarméns Scoutförbund (FA)

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Frälsningsarméns scoutförbund, which is open to both girls and boys, was founded in 1916. Today it has approximately 1614 members, of which about 754 are girls.

Districts coincide with the divisions of the parent association. The Salvation Army Guide and Scout Association in Sweden co-operates with the International Salvation Army Guide and Scout organization.

 

Organisation name: Nykterhetsrörelsens Scoutförbund (NSF)

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Temperance Guide and Scout Association is open to both boys and girls. Scouting began as an activity within the Swedish Temperance Movement in 1927. Over four decades it was run by two different associations, NTO’s Guide and Scout Association and IOGT’s Guide and Scout Association. In 1970 they united and became the Temperance Guide and Scout Association. Today the Association has approximately 5,465 members, of which about 2,674 are girls. The Association works very closely with the non-political and non-religious temperance movement IOGT-NTO.

A fundamental principle, along with the Guide/Scout Law and Promise, learning and doing, the patrol system, outdoor life and international understanding, is personal temperance. Members over 12 years of age make a temperance pledge. This means they do not drink any beverage with more than 2.25 per cent alcohol by volume, which is so low that one cannot become inebriated or dependent.

Switzerland – Europe Region

Organisation name: Mouvement Scout De Suisse (MSdS)

 

Members: 19179

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Between 1913 and 1916 nine groups of Girl Guides were formed independently in different parts of Switzerland. In 1919 these groups joined together to become one Association, the Fédération des Eclaireuses Suisses (FESes). A major change took place in 1987 when the Fédération des Eclaireuses Suisses and the Scout Association, Fédération des Eclaireurs Suisses, merged together to become the Mouvement Scout de Suisse (Swiss Guide and Scout Movement).

Syria – Arab Region

Organisation name: Scouts Syriens (Guides Branch)

 

Age Groups with names

Brownies (7-11 years)
Girl Guides (12-14 years)
Senior Guides (15-17 years)
Ranger Guides (18-23 years).

 

Members: 1341

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding and Scouting has been in existence in Syria since the 1950s. The 3rd Arab Regional Conference was held in Damascus in 1970, followed by the Arab Committee Meeting in 1976. (This was the time when the Arab Region was still called the Arab Bureau) The dominating political party, the Baath Arab Socialist Party, banned all Youth Organizations, as they were influenced by extremist groups and could become a threat to the National security. As a result, the Guiding/Scouting Movement ceased to be officially recognized from the 1980s. Syria entered a new phase following the election of Bashar Al-Assad, the President of Syria and in July 2000 Guiding and Scouting was again allowed to operate.

There is a strong National Board Team that works well together. Their commendable and outstanding effort to re-launch Guiding/Scouting Movement in the Syrian society has not only been successful in recruiting new members, but also in gaining the full trust and credibility of the people. There is big potential for growth within the Association and this will have a great impact in shaping, developing and improving the position of women in the society. There is very good and strong cooperation between Guides and Scouts and many events and trainings are carried out jointly, however, most of their units are single-sex.

Restarting Guiding/Scouting in Syria has proven to be exciting and rewarding for many former Scouts and Guides Leaders. The current membership figure is 1020 but a big increase is expected within the next triennium.

Guiding is open to girls and young women from all ethnic groups and religious backgrounds Guiding is mostly carried out in clubs and local communities and includes a cross section of girls and young women from various backgrounds and faiths. Muslims and Christians work in good harmony. The former Guide/Scout Leaders are playing a pivotal role in the growth of the Association. Their dedication, hard work and true Guiding/Scouting spirit is very refreshing and rewarding to witness.

Taiwan – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Girl Scouts of Taiwan

 

Age Groups with names

Huey-Chi Scout 23+

Senior Girl Scout 17-21

Ranger Girl Scout 15-17

Girl Scout 11-15

Brownie Scout 7-11

 

Members: 17436

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Girl Scout troop was organized in Shanghai, China in 1919. At that time it was known as the Boy Scouts of China. The Scout badge was worn by both Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts with no independent section for Girl Scouts. During the war years, 1939 to 1945, the Girl Scouts performed outstanding service, helping in hospitals and schools.

When the political situation changed, the Association was moved from mainland China to Taiwan with the Government. It was felt that there was a need to organize a single organization for Girl Scouts. The Chinese Girl Scouts Planning and Training Committee was set up in 1952, and the Girl Scouts Association was formally established on 1 June 1958. The date of 1 June was declared ‘Chinese Girl Scouts’ Day’. Today, the Girl Scouts in Taiwan enjoy the support and encouragement of the Government.

Tanzania – Africa Region

Organisation name: The Tanzania Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Tanzanites 3-6

Viangza 7-9

Guides 10-15

Rangers 16-25

Young Leaders 26-30+

Adult Leaders 31+

 

Members: 71236

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The first Guide company started in the former East African State of Tanganyika in 1928, but it was not until 1935 that Guiding became firmly established, following the visit in the same year of the Founder and the World Chief Guide. In 1938 a territorial council and local Association were formed, and from 1940 to 1950 Guiding spread to all areas of the country. The first executive committee was formed in 1957. In 1964 the independent states of Tanganyika and Zanzibar united as the United Republic of Tanzania, and the Association was renamed.

Thailand – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: Girl Guides (Girl Scouts) of Thailand

 

Age Groups with names

Senior Guide 16-21

Guide 11-15

Bluebird 7-11

Littlebird 4-6

 

Members: 57731

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girl Guiding began in Thailand in 1957 and the Girl Guides Association of Thailand was formally registered in 1958. The Association received visits from World Association trainers, and Guiding expanded rapidly with the formation of Guide companies all over the country. In 1962 the Association was granted Royal Patronage by Her Majesty Queen Sirikit.

The Association’s headquarters in Bangkok were opened in 1967 and consist of an administrative block with adjoining hostel which provides facilities for visiting Association members, guest rooms, a cafeteria, Guide shop, swimming pool, sauna and training facilities where courses are run for girls and young women.

Togo – Africa Region

Organisation name: Association des Guides du Togo

 

Age Groups with names

Guide Aînée (Ranger) 17+

Guide (Guide) 12-17

Jeannette (Brownie) 7-12

 

Members: 3236

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girl Guiding in Togo began in 1942 with the formation of the Eclaireuses Unionistes du Togo, and in 1956 Guides du Togo was established. Activities of the two organizations were carried out under the auspices of Scoutisme Féminin du Togo. The members of the Eclaireuses Unionistes du Togo were mainly in rural areas of the country, while the Guides du Togo had members in schools and parishes, and also in the countryside. The Association caters for the special needs of Roman Catholic girls.

 

Eclaireuses Unionistes du Togo

There had been no news of active Girl Guiding by the Eclaireuses Unionistes du Togo for several years, due to unrest. But now WAGGGS has re-established contact with the Association and the Movement has restarted.

Tonga – Asia Pacific Region

Organisation name: The Girl Guides Association of the Kingdom of Tonga

 

Age Groups with names

Brownies – 7+

Guides – 10+

Rangers – 14+

 

Members: 2238

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding was started in Tonga at the instigation of Queen Salote in 1952, and the first companies were formed on the island of Tongatapu. In 1955 the consort of the present King became Commissioner of the Association. The first Brownie pack was started in 1957 and, during the next few years, Guiding spread to the islands of Ha’apai and Vava’u, and to the ‘Eua in 1971.

In 1986 the Guide Association (UK) signed a Deed of Transfer which gave Tonga, formerly a Branch Association, self-government in all areas of work.

The geography of the country and the lack of roads make communication between the islands difficult, which prevents regular visits and training events on the outlying islands. At present, Guiding is active only on the main island due to a lack of leaders. Teachers interested in Guiding are currently being encouraged to start units in their schools. Guiding started again in 1998 in one of the outer islands – Vava’u Island.

Trinidad & Tobago – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: The Girl Guides Association of Trinidad and Tobago

 

Age Groups with names

Young Leader 18-25

Ranger 15-18

Senior Guide 12-15

Junior Guide 9-12

Brownie Guide 6-9

 

Members: 2886

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Trinidad and Tobago began in 1914, and the Association became a registered Branch Association of the Guide Association (UK). In 1930, the foundation stone of the Girl Guide headquarters was laid by the Founder and World Chief Guide.

Tunisia – Arab Region

Organisation name: Scouts Tunisiens

 

Members: 7336

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Guide Movement in Tunisia was founded in 1934. In 1991, the Female Section of Scouts Tunisiens established a strategy to develop the Guide Movement until 2002, thus implementing the recommendation of the WAGGGS World Conference and the Arab Conference concerning ‘the development of girls and young women’. Their strategy is to develop and promote educational programmes and methods according to the needs of girls and young women, and the needs of the community.

Turkey – Europe Region

Organisation name: Turkiye Izcileri Federasyonu (TIF)

 

Age Groups with names

Rehber Ýzci (Young Adults) 18-22

Ergin Ízci (Venture Guide) 15-18

Ízci (Guide) 11-15

Yyldyz Ýzci (Star) 7-11

Ýzci (Smurf) 5-7

 

Members: 14457

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Scouting started in 1912 and latest research shows that there were Girl Guides units in Turkey as early as 1912. After the foundation of the Turkish Republic in 1923, Girl Guiding spread to several schools over the country. In 1936, the Directorate of Scouting and Guiding was founded. This Directorate acted as the central governing body for both Guides and Scouts.

In 1968 the Association became a joint association, and in 1991, the joint association turned into a Federation: the Scouting and Girl Guiding Federation of Turkey.

In the Federation women and men have equal voting rights and a balanced representation.

There are girl only units and some mixed units in the Association depending on the interests and needs of the young people. No matter what type of unit, the needs and development of girls and young women, and the spirit and fundamental principles of Girl Guiding are emphasised.

Turks and Caicos Islands (Europe Region)

 

Turks and Caicos Girlguiding (formerly The Turks and Caicos Girl Guide Association) is a Guiding organization in the Turks and Caicos Islands. It is one of the nine branch associations of Girlguiding UK. It is represented by Girlguiding UK at World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) level and Girlguiding UK's Chief Guide is also Chief Guide for Turks and Caicos Girlguiding. Turks and Caicos Girlguiding is part of the Caribbean Link for Guiding.

The program is a modified form of Guiding in the United Kingdom, adapted to suit local conditions, with the same promise, and Rainbow, Brownie, Guide and Ranger groups.

Uganda – Africa Region

Organisation name: The Uganda Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

Cadet 17+

Ranger 15+

Guide 11-15

Brownie 7 -11

 

Members: 174219

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Uganda began between 1914 and 1918 at Toro Girls’ School, but it was not until 1922 that the first Guide company was officially recognized and the Movement was firmly established.

Guiding subsequently spread throughout the country, and the Guide Association (UK) sent trainers to Uganda, who helped to organize camps and training courses. In 1956 the World Chief Guide visited Uganda and laid the foundation stone of the headquarters for the Girl Guide and Scout Associations.

During the 1970s membership declined because of the difficult political situation, but since 1981 Guiding has steadily grown and companies and packs which had ceased to function have been restarted, except in the North where there is still insecurity.

The Field Executive, Executive for the Africa Region and WAGGGS members are working hard in the region and the Association benefits greatly from this assistance

Ukraine – Europe Region

Organisation name: Association of Ukrainian Guides (AGU)

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 16-20

Guide 11-16

Swallow 7-11

 

Members: 287

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

The Guide Movement was born in Ukraine in 1993: the first Guide Groups were in the Western (Chernovtsy), Central (Kiev) and Eastern (Kharkov) parts of the country.

Norway was identified as the Link country to support development of Guiding in Ukraine. Representatives of WAGGGS and of Norway made frequent visits to Ukraine to find women interested in Guiding and to lead training events and to co-ordinate the establishment of a national Guide organization.

The Association of Ukrainian Guides (AGU) was established by the Founding Conference of the Association on 25 November 1995. Since then, the National Conference is held annually and the National Board (elected at Conference) has its regular meetings. The Association continues its development in such fields as education, community projects, training for leaders and international cooperation. In 2001, the Association’s first president was elected as a member of the European Committee.

United Arab Emirates – Arab Region

Organisation name: Girl Guides Association of the United Arab Emirates

 

Age Groups with names

Senior Guide 16-18

Guide 12-15

Flower 6-11

 

Members: 5120

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in the United Arab Emirates began in 1973 when Girl Guide companies were opened in Sharjah. In the same year the first training for 30 leaders was run by the Arab Training Commissioner and Guiding has since spread to all seven Emirates.

The Girl Guides Association of the United Arab Emirates was officially registered with the Government in 1979. Guiding has now reached all educational sectors, including the University, and efforts are being made to extend the Movement to rural areas.

United States of America – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Girl Scouts of the USA

 

Age Groups with names

Girl Scout Ambassador, grades 11-12 (age 16-18)

Girl Scout Senior, grades 9-10 (age 14-16)

Girl Scout Cadette, grades 6-8 (age 11-14)

Girl Scout Junior, grades 4-5 (age 9-11)

Girl Scout Brownie, grades 2-3 (age 7-9)

Girl Scout Daisy, grades k-1 (age 5-7)

 

Members: 3169371

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Among the many people who brought the idea of Guiding to the USA, Juliette "Daisy" Gordon Low assembled 18 girls from Savannah, Georgia, on March 12, 1912, for a local Girl Scout meeting. She believed that all girls should be given the opportunity to develop physically, mentally, and spiritually. With the goal of bringing girls out of isolated home environments and into community service and the open air, Girl Scouts hiked, played basketball, went on camping trips, learned how to tell time by the stars, and studied first aid.

Within a few years, Daisy's dream for a girl-centered organization was realized. Today, Girl Scouts of the USA has a membership of over 3.2 million girls and adults, a significant growth from its modest beginnings nearly a century ago. In fact, more than 50 million women in the U.S. today are Girl Scout alumnae.

United States Virgin Islands

See USA

Venezuela – Western Hemisphere Region

Organisation name: Asociación De Guías Scouts De Venezuela

 

Age Groups with names

(Ranger) Guía Mayor 15-18

(Guide) Guía Menor 10-15

(Little Fairy) Hadita 6-10

(Daisy) Marganta 4 ½ -6

 

Members: 522

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding began in Venezuela in 1958 when the Asociación de Muchachas Guías de Venezuela was founded in Caracas. In 1959 several companies were formed elsewhere in the country, and the first Guide rally and the first National Assembly were held. In 1972 the Association changed its name to the Asociación de Guías Scouts de Venezuela.

Wallis and Funtuna

See France

Yemen – Arab Region

Organisation name: Yemen Republic Girl Guides Association

 

Age Groups with names

(Ranger) Juwalat 16-23

(Guide) Murshidad 12-15

(Brownie) Zahrat 7-12

 

Members: 11765

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Girl Guiding has existed in the Yemen Republic since 1962, and in 1972 it was officially organized under one official administrative body. In 1975 the Yemen Scouts and Girl Guides Association was set up, which spread Guiding to areas of the country where it had not previously existed.

The Association became a member of the Arab Regional Group in 1980. During the next few years, trainers from the Arab Bureau helped to prepare leaders and open new companies. In 1986 Yemen successfully hosted the 10th Arab Conference which served as a platform for women leaders within the Association to demonstrate their abilities to government authorities and the public. Women demonstrated that they could hold positions of authority and carry out their responsibilities effectively. As a result the Girl Guides Association became a separate Association working independently of the Scouts.

In 1990 the People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen merged with the Yemen Arab Republic. Guiding had previously developed in the Arab Republic but now started to spread to all areas of the newly created Republic of Yemen.

Zambia – Africa Region

Organisation name: Girl Guides Association of Zambia

 

Age Groups with names

Guide Cadet 18+

Ranger 14-18

Guide 11-15

Lechwe Guide 5-11

 

Members: 23531

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding began in Zambia in 1924 when the first Guide company was registered in Livingstone, the capital of what was then Northern Rhodesia. In the same year a Ranger unit was opened, and two years later the first Brownie pack was set up.

In 1930 the Wayfarers, an organization for African girls working along similar lines to the Guide Association, was started and by 1936 it was known as the Wayfarer Guides and Sunbeams. After a referendum in 1948, the Wayfarers joined the Guides to make one Movement for all the girls in Zambia. In 1952 all girls under 11 years became known as Brownies and the Association was unified under one Commissioner.

When Zambia became an independent republic within the Commonwealth in 1964, the Girl Guides Association of Zambia, previously a Branch Association of the Guide Association (United Kingdom) became self-governing in all areas of work. In 1966 the first Zambian Chief Commissioner was appointed and the newly built headquarters were opened in Lusaka.

In 1974 the name Brownie was changed to Lechwe Guide, the lechwe being a species of brown antelope found only in Zambia.

Zimbabwe – Africa Region

Organisation name: Girl Guides Association of Zimbabwe

 

Age Groups with names

Ranger 14-20

Guide 10-17

Brownie 7-11

Sunbeam 5-7

 

Members: 24270

 

How Guiding started in the Country (including any gaps in membership)

Guiding in Zimbabwe began in 1912. In 1926 the Wayfarers, an organization for African girls working along similar lines to the Guide Movement, was started. In 1940 the two Movements began to merge, and this process was completed in 1950.

The name of the Association was changed in 1981 from the Girl Guides Association of Rhodesia to the Girl Guides Association of Zimbabwe.

FORMER MEMBERS


In addition, there are a number of countries who have been members of WAGGGS in the past, but are not currently.  The reasons for this are varied, and can include political regimes, falling numbers, and a range of other reasons.  Below are details of some of the former members of WAGGGS, and what information (if any) is available on each of them.

 

Cuba - Asociación de Guías de Cuba, last mentioned in 1969, no longer a member of WAGGGS

 

Ethiopia - last mentioned in 1984, now part of Ethiopia Scout Association

 

Indonesia - Gerakan Pramuka left WAGGGS and joined WOSM in 2002

 

Iran - Fereshtegan-e Pishahang-e Īrān, last mentioned in 1979, no longer a member of WAGGGS

 

Samoa - Samoa Girl Guides Association, membership cancelled in 2008

 

Tuvalu - Girl Guides Association of Tuvalu, membership withdrawn in 2005

 

Uruguay - Asociación Guías Scout del Uruguay, membership cancelled in 2014

(The association became an associate member of WAGGGS in 1966. Due to problems in the association, the membership was revoked in 2014 after some years of suspension.)

 

Vanuatu - Vanuatu Girl Guides Association, membership cancelled in 2008

 

Vietnam - Hội Nữ Hướng Đạo Việt Nam, last mentioned in 1973, no longer a member of WAGGGS