Leslie's Guiding History Site

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Guiding Fiction

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From the earliest days of Guiding, authors were incorporating Guiding into stories - and writing stories specifically about Brownies, Guides, and Sea Rangers.  Here we'll look at some of the books, storylines, and authors.

The first thing to consider is era.  The classic era for Girl Guide fiction was 1912 - 1955 (though Brownie fiction lasted a little longer).  These eras are also matched by the classic era for general stories aimed at girls - the school stories and adventure stories.  


The next thing to consider is the definition of Guide fiction.  There is no debate over the stories where Guiding is the focus of the plot, and stories where there is at least one chapter specifically about Guides.  Where it gets more tricky is stories where 'the heroine knew what to do because she had been a Guide'.  I will try to stick to the 'at least one chapter or equivalent' as a baseline.

The first Guiding fiction book was Terry The Girl Guide, by Dorothea Moore.  Moore was an experienced author of fiction for girls, who went on to be a Guider in Eastbourne.  Terry's five brothers are keen Scouts and regular campers, and though she tries to hide her disappointment that she is helping them pack and giving them early breakfast, whereas in most activities she could join in with them, in this she cannot.  Yet she had heard her father's tales of Nurse Fleur-de-Lys, who had saved her father when he was wounded in the war in South Africa.  Then when her father takes her on holiday to France, and she is waiting for him to finish changing so she can have her first swimming lesson from him, she sees two children struggling in the water and, knowing nothing of swimming or lifeline, is helpless to do anything to help but call her father for him to help them, for she can do nothing . . .


Dorothea Moore went on to write a number of other books, some featuring Guiding, in the 1910s and 1920s, most of which were well received and followed within the usual lines for Guiding stories, of being 'just about plausible'.  The one exception to that was one of her last books, 'Judy, Patrol Leader'.  There is a suspicion amongst many readers that this book was actually concocted by the publisher out of several separate short stories, which were strung together and packaged as one book without reference to the author - the unfortunate result is the tale of a schoolgirl heroine which lurches from her carrying out one dramatic rescue-from-the-jaws-of-disaster to the next - within a matter of a few days or weeks.  Only a very young and naive reader would not be left wondering whether Judy was really the award-winning heroine she is presented as - or is actually a top-grade jinx, sure to bring disaster and danger to anyone who as much as momentarily crosses her path!

Brenda Girvin was another experienced children's author, who tried her hand at a Guide story in the early years.  Her "The Girl Scout" from 1913 featured Aggie and her friends trying their hands at Scouting and at being rivals to the Boy Scouts Aggie's brother had joined, before in due course being issued with Guide uniforms and registered as Girl Guides.


It is especially fascinating as it underwent various versions over the years - the uniforms changed from Brown to Blue, and some of the references were updated, as was the principal character in the final chapter . . .


Girvin wrote more books - Betty the Girl Guide and June the Girl Guide, both of which showed her general skill as an author

Other Guide authors of the 1910s were A M Irvine, author of Nora the Girl Guide, which follows the classic school-story tale of the bad girl made good.  Or rather, not just good, but spectacularly so.  


Her other Guiding book, Naida the Tenderfoot, again follows the same lines of bad girl who eventually makes good.  


Also writing in this era is Constance Gregory , author of 'The Castlestone House Company', published in 1918.  In it, one of the girls buys a copy of "Girl Guiding" and shares it with her friends.  They choose a teacher to approach about forming a Guide Patrol, only to discover that the headmistress is actually considering starting a school Guide Company.  Soon, Guide mania spreads through the school, as the Guides devote long hours to learning the skills, and long to live up to elder brothers by 'doing their bit' for the country too..  

Elsie Oxenham is more famous for her main 'Tuck Shop Girls' series, but did write some books about Guides within that series, often contrasting them with the Camp Fire Movement for Girls, which followed a less formal and more domestic skills-focussed programme.  Her Guide books were The Tuck-Shop Girl, The School of Ups and Downs, Patience Joan Outsider, and The Crisis in Camp Keema.  


Started in the USA, the Camp Fire movement was more focussed on self-expression and on homeskills than Guiding - they didn't go in for formal uniforms and drill, but wore fringed robes similar in style to those worn by some native Americans, and worked to earn beads to wear on their robes.

The 1920s saw an expansion in Guiding, and equally, an expansion in Guide fiction.  HB Davidson started her career and wrote many books focussed not just on Guides, but also on Brownies and on Rangers too.  


Her Brownie books often focussed on individuals joining a pack and finding their place amidst fun and adventures.  Her Guide books tended to focus on working girls, often leaving home and earning their own living in shops or factories, whilst taking evening classes in order to progress their careers, or otherwise being uprooted in some way and finding themselves in unfamiliar circumstances, where they make good.    

F O H Nash, from 1923, also wrote several Guide books.  As well as several one-off Guide books, she wrote a series of books about Audrey, a Sea Ranger.  Often her books feature a rebel character - someone up to no good, or treating others unfairly.  

Sybil B Owsley was writing in the late 1920s and 1930s, and did feature some instances of middle-class Guides learning from their working class sisters.  She was better known for the Brownie fiction books she wrote.

Unusual among the authors was Mrs A C Osborn Hann.  Dorothy Osborn Hann was a vicar's wife, and was unusual in writing solely about working-class Guides, from Walworth in London, in a naturalistic way without stereotyping or patronising them, yet reflecting some of the realities of their lives such as infant mortality, poverty, effects of wayward fathers on the family, etc, .  She wrote a series of books about a particular fictional Guide unit, with her heroine, Peg, going from new Guide appointed as Daffodil Patrol Leader when the Guide Company is first started through to becoming married with children, and to being a Guide Captain in her own right.  The books were also unusual in featuring photographs of real-life Guides - and in featuring the reality rather than the rose-tinted view - including Promise ceremonies where the recruit needed to be prompted, or incidents where it was the authorities or adults to the rescue, not always a heroic Guide.  The books included snippets such as instructions for the games the unit played or the jokes they made (such as the humorous limericks by 'Spud'), and featuring a range of different plausible character types, most of whom were neither wholly bad or wholly good.  Other books of hers were 'spin-offs' from the series - such as The Sunshine Shop which featured the PL of one of the other Patrols.  


She also wrote some Brownie stories, in the same style, and again featuring photographs of real-life Brownies, and featuring Peg's children.

Also in the 1920s was Winifred Darch, author of Poppies and Prefects, Cecil of the Carnations, Gillian of the Guides, Cicely Bassett, Patrol Leader, and The Lower Fourth and Joan.  

One of the most famous girls' story book authors, Elinor M Brent-Dyer, also tried her hand at Guide stories.  As well as including Guide stories in her classic 'Chalet School' series, especially in 'The Rivals of the Chalet School' and especially 'The Chalet Girls in Camp'.  But there were also one-off stories, including Judy the Guide.  



another, Ethel Talbot, started with 'Peggy's Last Term, published in 1920 but set during the First World War, but then went on to focus on Sea Ranger stories, with Jan at Island School, Skipper and Co, and Sea Rangers All.  Sea Ranger stories do give lots of opportunities for drama - especially if they are set in Cornwall, which seems to be stereotyped as a hotbed of smugglers, and of locals who accept tourists whilst being highly suspicious of them.  Thus the books will often feature boats with illicit cargo, smugglers who use offshore islands, and shipwreck or stolen boats leading to people being left as castaways.

By the 1930s fiction was in full swing, and author Ernest Protheroe, in the guise of both Alys Chatwyn, and Phyllis Hanley, was contributing to the genre, The Phylis Hanley books included Winning Her Way, Girls' Grit, and Bridget Of The Guides. 

Margaret Middleton was another prolific 1930s author.  Her books included The Guide Camp at Herons Bay, The Guide Adventurers, The House of Golden Hind, Three Girls and a Car, and The Island Camp.

Violet Methley's books were The Bunyip Patrol, the Story of an Australian Girls' School, The Windmill Guides, and Mystery Camp.  


Other authors of the era were Joan Herbert, author of With Best Intentions, The Trail of the Blue Shamrock, The Three Halves, One's a Pair and Jennifer Gay.


Marjorie Royce produced Eileen the Lone Guide, EE Cowper wrote Corporal Ida's Floating Camp, The Mystery of Saffron Manor, Wild Rose to the Rescue, and Cross Winds Farm, and EM Channon's The Honour of A Guide.

Nancy Hayes wrote The Plucky Patrol, Meg-All-Alone, The Caravan Patrol, and The Guides at Calamity Hill


Christine Chaundler wrote Bunty of the Blackbirds, Jill of the Guides, and The Amateur Patrol.

a major figure in this era was Catherine Christian, who, though she wrote throughout the 1930s, was the editor of "The Guide" throughout World War 2.  She wrote Guide stories as Catherine Christian, and Ranger stories as Patience Gilmour - many of her stories were written to be serialised in "The Guide", before being published in book form afterwards.  From 'Cherries In Search Of A Captain' to stories such as 'The Kingfishers See It Through' and 'The School At Emery's End' during the war.


Unusually, Catherine Christian also wrote two books for Guiders, which were serialised in "The Guider" before WW2 and into the start of it - "Harriet - The Return of Rip Van Winkle", and the sequel, "Harriet Takes The Field".  These focussed on a former Guider, returned from a decade spent working as a doctor abroad, and taking on the District Commissioner role in her new home village.  Although presented as fiction, they were clearly intended as propoganda, reflecting what the author felt Guiding ought to be in the run-up to WW2, and it's early years.  The characters of the different Guiders within the District, and their differing units, is clearly highlighted, as are her thoughts on how the whole Ranger set-up could be altered - ideas which could still be relevant in modern times.

At the same time, the editor of "The Guider", Margaret Tennyson, was writing under the name Carol Forrest.  She shared a flat in Battersea with Catherine Christian, and after they were bombed out, moved into a wooden caravan sited on Blacklands Farm campsite, and then to Woldringham in Surrey.  Several of her books feature Guides and friends Chris and Penny, and Penny's ex-Guide Aunt, Flick.  These, too, like the books of Catherine Christian, had an element of propoganda, promoting a back-to-basics of Guiding - back to the founder's ideas of tracking and backwoods skills.

Post World War 2, books were fewer.  Ivy Middleton continued to produce her series about the Pimpernel Patrol, which had started immediately pre-war.  The series focussed on Patrol Leader Kay Danvers, and to a lesser extent her Patrol in a provincial town, but soon featuring her visits to London, and then her permanent move there as she joins a Ranger Unit.  Her Patrol are heavily focussed on large-scale good turns, and seem to devote most evenings and weekends to Patrol meetings and fundraising activities, with homework dodged in here and there!  

C R Mansell was another post-war author producing books such as The Ragtail Patrol, The Littlest Guide, Curlew Camp, and The Swallows See It Through.  Her books are less 'rose-tinted' than those of most other authors, focusing on Patrol Leaders coping with imperfect Guides - those who are financially disadvantaged, scatter-brained, lazy, or incompetent, and who aren't sorted overnight, or automatically within weeks of becoming Guides . . .

Freda Collins wrote a number of books for Brownies in the post-war period. She produced several collections of short stories, as well as encouraging 'beauty quests' of nature study, principally flowers, feathers and shells.

Verily Anderson, who had worked at Guide Headquarters during WW2, wrote Brownie fiction books in the 1960s and 1970s.


Pamela Sykes wrote Brownie fiction in the 1970s.


Dorothy Richardson worked in the 1980s.


For all three authors, the focus was on a small group of Brownies within a pack, who try their best to do their good turns, and can find themselves involved in mysteries or adventures - there is much less whimsy or focus on nature study or picnic outings than there had been in Brownie stories of past decades.


By this era, bar a few stories in the annuals, Guiding fiction was almost entirely Brownie fiction, with no new Guide fiction books being published.  Ast "The Guide" became "Today's Guide", so there too, stories were replaced by factual articles, badge hints, and Patrol activities.  

Throughout all of the fiction books written, some common themes arise - so common that one could create a list of themes, and a list of books belonging to each.  Some of these themes are as one might expect - but others are less obvious topics for Guiding fiction.  The list of common themes would include:

  • 'Our Week At Camp' - usually contains enough incidents for three or four years' camps, but all individually within the bounds of plausibility.
  • 'Bad Girls Made Good' - either one or several girls who are getting into trouble until they join Guides, and are changed as a result . . .
  • 'Ruritania' - in a monarchy somewhere in Eastern Europe, there is a Princess - either she goes to boarding school and becomes a Guide, or she has a wicked Uncle who believes he should be the next monarch and tries to get her out-of-the-way to achieve this, but is foiled by a Guide . . .
  • 'The Big House At Risk' - Her family have lived in the same house for generations, but can't afford to live there much longer - unless the long lost treasure buried by their ancestor could be found.  One of the last things they do before moving out is host a camp for her Guide or Ranger friends . . .
  • 'The Family Scandal' - The family are now reduced to poverty because of a family scandal where they were accused but innocent, now it just so happens that Guide Camp is being held back by the ancestral home, which would allow the daughter to try and uncover the truth . . .
  • 'The Independent Girl' - The Ranger leaves her home and moves to a relative's house or to a hostel in order to take up work - and often also night school classes, succeeding against the odds or despite the pressures - those who spend their evenings going out are, natch, feckless.
  • 'The Poor Girl At Posh School' - The girl who gets a scholarship, fears being out of place, but finds Guides a way of being an equal.
  • 'Ace Guide Saves Run-Down Company' - The Company is a mess, the PLs are thinking of quitting as nothing is ever achieved at meetings due to disruption and misbehaviour, the younger Guides are out of control led by their ringleader - until Ace Guide arrives, sorts out the discipline, inspires the Leaders, and turns around the whole Company in next to no time.
  • 'The Downtrodden Orphan' - Usually lives with a stepmother or an aunt, sometimes a genuine orphan, sometimes a child who has been left with relatives while parent(s) are abroad long-term.  Is usually employed as a domestic slave who can do no right, her one escape being the weekly Guide meeting which for reasons unclear is the one outside activity she is permitted to attend . . .
  • 'The Guide Detective' - the Guide or Guides discover a crime, turn detective, and outsmart the police, finally presenting the police officers with all the answers on a place, so they can stroll in and make the arrests.
  • 'The Guide In Secret' - She isn't allowed to join the Guide Company/Brownie Pack, so vows to be a member in secret, try to live by the promise, carry out good turns, learn the skills - and then the crisis happens, she uses the skills she has learned, and the adults change their minds about Guiding . . .
  • 'The Back To Basics Guides' - In a Unit that isn't working, they discover a copy of "Scouting For Boys", start doing activities from it, and are inspired . . .
  • 'The All Work And No Play Patrol' - So keen about Guides are they, that school is seemingly squeezed in around Guiding grudgingly - they're never at home unless to host the others as every evening seems to be devoted to working on Good Turns or holding Patrol meetings or doing badge-work.  Where they fit in homework or housework or spending time with their families other than at meals isn't clear . . .. 
  • 'The Sea Ranger Camp In Cornwall' - if they are Sea Rangers they will camp by the sea in Cornwall natch, the locals will be suspicious of the incomers and the Rangers will foil smugglers.  

Annuals


As well as Guiding fiction books, Guiding made a few abortive attempts at Annuals.  These were large-size books aimed at the Christmas-present-buying market, and often featured a number of standalone fiction stories, alongside factual articles, crafts, puzzles, jokes and in later years, photo features.  Initially there were the occasional annual produced by mainstream publishers, some endorsed by the Guide Association, some not.  Later there were attempts at official books, although not titled as 'annuals' - there was "The First Trail of the Girl Guides" and it's sequel (naturally, "The Second Trail . . .").  There were also a series of 'Rucksack books' which appear to have been intended for Guides to take to camp as reading material during 'rest hour'.  This meant that although annuals were popular in wider society, it wasn't until the late 1950s, when Guiding teamed up with the publisher Purnell (later World Books) that regular annuals were produced, initially for Brownies and Guides, later for Rainbows.  The annuals had their heyday from the 1960s to the 1990s (reflecting the membership numbers following the baby booms), but sales dwindled, and production had ceased by the early 2000s.


Throughout their existence the annuals featured a number of fiction stories.  Or, should I say, during the Purnell years, re-featured - a lot of recycling went on, on the assumption that every few years there would be a new generation of readers who wouldn't twig.  So the same story might appear featuring Guides in the annual one year, reappear a couple of years later in the Scout annual with the characters transformed into a Scout patrol - then a few years later appear in the Brownie annual, presented as offering a taster of Guides for older Brownies . . .Several of the stories were further recycled by being packaged in books, attributed to the annuals' editor, Robert Moss.

Magazines - Guide


Just as "The Scout" had done, so "The Guide" from it's earliest days featured fiction stories.  These were usually long-running serials, many of which went on to be published in book form.  Each appeared weekly, with a synopsis at the start of the latest episode to allow those who had missed issues to catch up, followed by three or four pages of densely packed print, in chapters, and illustrated with pen-and-ink style images.  These were naturally intended to encourage regular purchase, or subscription.  A number of the early stories were by the same writers who provided serial stories for "The Scout", later the editors of "The Guide" and "The Guider contributed under their pen-names, Catherine Christian, Carol Forrest or Patience Gilmour - as at that time, Rangers (and Brownies) were catered for in "The Guide" magazine.


Storylines in the early fiction stories tended to feature the Patrol set up in the face of local opposition to 'tomboy' activities, who nevertheless stick to working on their skills, and go on to carry out an act of heroism which persuades the critics of their worth.  Or adventure abroad involving detectives and plots against monarchs in far-off invented kingdoms.  Or of Guide units in boarding schools, where those in the Guides are shown as 'goody-goody' until the ringleader of the rebels is converted, and soon becomes the keenest Guide in the school - and often the heroine in a crisis as well.


Once World War 2 threatened, more 'targeted' fiction appeared - one could go as far as to say, propaganda - featuring Guides getting 'back to basics' with their Guide skills in case a war came, learning their tracking and firelighting and first aid - and once war started, devoting many evenings of their free time to their 'dig for victory' gardens, their waste paper collection, their canteen work, welcoming and integrating the evacuees into their units.  However, it wasn't long before paper rationing dug deep, the magazine was reduced to a quarter of it's size other than for occasional special issues, and fiction tended to be briefer and more concentrated - and in some weeks was crowded out by other material.  


Postwar, long serials were largely out, and standalone or short-run stories were the only survivors, with the magazines focusing much more on practical activities, badgework, advice for Patrol Leaders and the like.  Through the 1970s and 1980s, items on fashion and pop music photos became more common, and fiction even rarer - and despite a couple of attempts at relaunch, with renaming first to "Today's Guide", and then in the 1990s to "Guide Patrol", by it's latter years it was more commonly read by Guiders than by actual Guides, and publication ceased.

Magazines - Brownie


From the earliest days of "The Guide", a couple of pages especially for Brownies were included.  These tended to feature a 'letter' from 'Brown Owl' with some sage advice, a three-panel cartoon featuring animal characters, a craft activity, and a story, often along fairy-tale lines.  Each story was brief and standalone.  


With the coming of World War 2, paper rationing impacted "The Guide" and the Brownie section of the magazine was reduced further, often amounting to one page.  Fiction still appeared, but the stories of necessity had to be even briefer.


In the ?early 1960s a new publication appeared - "The Brownie" - at last a magazine of their own.  As well as features and space for submissions by Brownies themselves, short stories regularly featured.  


By the 1970s the magazine was A4 in size, and often featured a mini serial on the front cover, featuring one or other of the Six emblem characters.  Standalone stories often appeared inside, the larger page size allowing more room for stories, as well as permitting line drawings.  These tended to feature fictional Brownies getting up to plausible mishaps or adventures.


In the 1980s the content of the front cover changed to being a cartoon strip, featuring a new character, "SuperBrownie" who regularly used her skills in adventures - and these were in full colour.  Fiction stories became less common, but continued to be more likely to feature Brownies.


But as with the Guide magazine, it became clear that the number of actual Brownies buying "The Brownie" was becoming outnumbered by the Guiders who bought it, and it was eventually closed.

Fiction Book Summaries

1865 - Juliana Horatia Ewing - The Brownies And Other Tales - George Bell And Sons.  The book which was adapted by Robert Baden-Powell as the 'Brownie story', the original is a story-within-a-story. The doctor, visiting the vicarage finds the young daughter crying - the vicarage children are in a row because their toys are all mixed up and missing bits, and she has forgotten to do her chores.  They question why they should have to do small jobs.  So the doctor tells them the story of Tommy Trout.  Tommy senior was a tailor, a widower who lived with his elderly mother who knitted rugs out of the tailor's scraps, and three children - Tommy jnr, Johnnie, and the baby.  Tommy and Johnnie made work instead of saving it, until their Grandmother told them about a certain wise owl . . .

1912 - Dorothea Moore - Terry The Girl Guide - Nisbet.   Terry's five brothers are keen Scouts and regular campers, and though she hides her disappointment in helping them pack and giving them early breakfast, in most activities she could join in with them.  Then there was Nurse Fleur-de-Lys, who had saved her father when he was wounded in the war in South Africa.  Then on holiday with her father at the French coast and waiting for her first swimming lesson from him, she sees two children struggling in the water and can do nothing to help but call her father . . .

1913 - Brenda Girvin - The Girl Scout - Milford.  Aggie Phillips' brother Peter brought the news of the burglary at Woodbourne.  Peter was Patrol Leader of the Panthers, a Patrol founded by the owner of Woodbourne, Colonel Norton.  Colonel Norton had made a written offer "Five pounds reward will be paid to the Ashleigh Patrol if, on or before Monday evening next, information be given which will lead to the capture of the thief or thieves who were at Woodbourne House last night, and as to the exact whereabouts of the missing property."  Peter hopes to secure the reward, which would enable the Patrol to furnish their recently acquired meeting place.  When Aggie suggests that she and her friends could form a Patrol and have a try at tracking the burglars he is scornful - which makes her more determined . . .

1913 - A.M. Irvine - Nora, the Girl Guide - Partridge.  Nora Gilbert is Abbotswell Hall's most troublesome pupil.  All of the pupils bar one are 'agin the Government' and support each others' misdeeds, but Nora is the natural leader.  The exception to the pupils' own code of honour is Brenda Gale, a new girl, who has been a Guide, and tries to keep her Promise despite it making her the odd one out.  It is Brenda who suggests to the head that a Guide company might be started in the school.  The school boarders are invited to Miss Baldwin's house, as happens each term, but this time Miss Baldwin offers that anyone who wants to know about Guides should stay for an extra hour.  To her surprise, at the end of the picnic, not only do all the under 11s go back to the school with the escort mistress, but so too do all but four of the seniors, due to Nora's threats.  Nevertheless, she explains about Guides to the four - including Brenda and Nora herself.  Miss Baldwin is called away early to an accident, so asks the four girls to head home early.  Nora and Claire opt to go to the cinema, to return to the school on time an hour later, but Brenda and the younger Kathleen refuse to join them.  Brenda and Kathleen are spotted returning, but Brenda refuses to say where Nora and Claire are.  Nore makes up a story about being sent to the chemist to fetch medicine.  But that night Nora's conscience bothered her for the first time, as she thought over some of the things Miss Baldwin had said about Tenderfeet, and honesty.  Could she confess, and lose face to Brenda and the whole school?

1918 - Constance Gregory - The Castlestone House Company - Pearson.  A new Guide company is started at Castlestone House school, with several of the girls keen to join.  Their headmistress gifts the Company a Union Flag, which arrives in time for their Empire Day outing to the quarry woods.  On arrival at a clearing in the wood, they stowed their coats, and as Mademoiselle is feeling the heat and prefers sitting on the rocks to exploring, she is left to look after the coats and flag, and build the fire to make tea later.  One of the girls slips in the stream so heads back to dry her socks by the fire.  Then one of the younger girls come to the Guides, claiming to have seen Mademoiselle throwing mud at the flag . . .

1920 - EL Haverfield - The Happy Comrade - Milford.  Penelope Druce lives with her mother and artist father - due to her father's ill health he is only able to work spasmodically, so money is tight.  The only other girl in the village is Monica Wingfield, daughter of Sir Anthony, and two years younger.  Though Penelope has gone to boarding school since she was 8, Monica hasn't been allowed to until now, when she has finally persuaded her father.  But she is soon disillusioned of the idea of their being best friends at school with Penelope looking after her throughout - quite apart from two years' difference in age, Penelope is head prefect.  Nevertheless, Monica is confused to discover that Penelope is not popular with Monica's classmates in the fourth form due to her enforcing of the rules - Monica faces difficult choices as a result . . .

1920 - Ethel Talbot - Peggy's Last Term - Nelson.  Peggy's Aunt, Grace McNair, had received a letter from the school.  Peggy was to be expelled at the end of term, to be sent to a stricter school.  Peggy couldn't deny the school's decision was fair.  She decided that when she went back she'd pretend she didn't care.  Then on arrival she finds that she has been made Dormitory Prefect, and Patrol Leader too - and there's a new Patrol Cup been introduced . . .

1921 - EE Cowper - Celia Wins - Collins.  Celia Hanbury is a pupil-teacher at The Meads boarding school, having been orphaned with no close relatives in the latter part of her school career.  Suddenly a distant relative has died, and in the will has left a house and a yearly income to Celia.  Next morning she caught the train down to visit the house - the locals seemed interested in her, though the Vicar let slip that it had had several short lets in recent years.  Celia opts to spend the summer in the house, and take four of the school Guides with her - despite rumours of the house being haunted . . .

1921 - EE Cowper - The Mystery Of Saffron Manor - Blackie.  Following the loss of their father and brother in WW1, the Fortescue sisters Elizabeth, Anne and Dulcie, and Aunt Dulcibella, are left in charge of Saffron Manor - or effectively Elizabeth and Anne are, Dulcie being too young and Aunt Dulcibella being rather detached from the realities of their circumstances.  The elder girls' responsibility is not an easy one - teenagers themselves, money is extremely tight despite cutting expenses to the bone, and household repairs will soon become pressing.  An offer raises their hopes - a family want to rent the house for six months, and offer a good sum for doing so - but they require a certain number of servants which the manor does not have - and affordable servants are impossible.  Then there is the question of where the Fortescues are to live affordably, if not at home?  Dulcie has an idea - she and Aunt Dulcibella could live shut up in the north wing while the rest of the house was let - and Elizabeth and Anne could work as the servants.  Can they get away with the ruse . . . ?

1921 - AM Irvine - The Girl Who Ran Away - Partridge.  Honor Harvey has been brought up by her father since her mother died five years ago.  Spoilt throughout, she considers herself mistress of the house, only doing what she wants, and believes herself talented to genius level at art, writing and acting.  Her father finally decides to send her to the school run by his sister-in-law, her Aunt Eleanor Kendall.  There Honor undergoes many trials in trying to adjust to life in the lower fourth in a boarding school . . .

1922 - E. E. Cowper - Wild Rose to the Rescue - Sheldon Press.  Millie Fanning is left to run her stepfather's remote farmhouse single-handed, and look after an infant boy, after a series of accidents.  At first she struggled to keep up with the workload - but suddenly, she started finding jobs on her worklist done, with no clue who could have done them.  The goat and kids were stolen.  Then one wet night a herd of ponies was let into the garden, stampeding over the lawns and vegetable garden - then a mystery figure with a whistle herded them away.  When Millie came downstairs from reassuring the boy, she glimpsed a figure dressed in a blue serrge skirt and jumper - and found the goats returned, and all her clothes mending work done . . .

1922 - Dorothea Moore - Greta Of The Guides - Partridge.  The Wendover Scholarship provides four years free boarding school tuition plus expenses, and the latest winner is - Greta Ward of Ashrington Municipal School.  And thus Greta, daughter of Lord Ashby's Head Gardner found herself going to Wendover, among the daughters of the upper classes.  And there is the prospect of lots of new experiences, like joining Guides . . .  

1922 - Dorothea Moore - Guide Gilly, Adventurer - Nisbet.  Gilly Seaton had, for as long as she could remember, lived with her father and two of his colleagues, Denham Chester and Hugh Rawson, in rooms.  Now that her father is dead, and the other two her guardians, Gilly agrees with the landlady's suggestion of boarding school, and as she has worked out that Denham Chester's next assignment will be to the kingdom of Dornia, she proposes going to Dornia with him and enrolling at school there.  Of course, when a reporter is sent on a hush-hush foreign assignment, it is usually because there is political trouble brewing . . .

1922 - F.O.H. Nash - How Audrey Became a Guide - Sheldon Press.  Twelve year old Audrey had been living with her Granny, Now her Father was leaving the army and setting up a home for Audrey, with his new wife, a few miles from Granny.  Audrey liked her new stepmother Hilda, except for one thing - she was a Guide Commissioner.  And when Hilda's young cousin Patsy, a Guide, comes to stay for the holidays, Audrey is even less keen.  Patsy was unused to being in the country, and using a log to cross a stream, it suddenly tipped, and Patsy twists her ankle - with no help near . . .

1923 - Joyce Bruce - The Twins To The Rescue - Pearson.  Twins Betty and Judy's plans for the school summer holidays are suddenly disrupted - their parents have suddenly been called away to South Africa on business, so they must go to stay with Aunt Alice.  Just before the train departs, a man jumps into their carriage at the last second, tripping up the step and landing on the floor, his bag bursting open.  During the journey he seems to stare at the twins a lot, then suddenly, when the train comes out of a tunnel, the twins discover that the man has disappeared . . .

1923 - Margaret Stuart Lane - Meg of the Brownies - Milford.  Meg, a Brownie, lived at Lindons Farm with her elder sister Lucy, a Guide, and brothers Rupert and Sammy.  Nearby leves Ellen Glaysher, who lives with her strict father and nervous Aunt.  Ellen is not allowed to play with the local children, and has been ill.  Meg meets Ellen's father, and offers Ellen an invitation to her birthday tea, being held in the hayfield, which the Brownies are attending, but he abruptly declines, saying "I'll have no child of mine taking up with Brownies" - a challenge that Meg accepts. 

1923 - F. O.H. Nash - Audrey in Camp - Sheldon Press.  Audrey goes to a camp involving four Companies, and enjoys all of the camp fun.

1924 - Janet Aldis - A Girl Guide Captain In India - RTS.  Newly arrived from London, the author becomes Captain of a listless group of 'European' Girl Guides in India.  Accustomed from birth to having everything done for them by servants, she has to work to persuade them to work on Tenderfoot and Second Class skills, but soon enthusiasm grows . . .

1924 - HB Davidson - Pat Of Whitehouse - Sheldon Press.  Pat Hamilton is brought up by her father, who is headmaster of a preparatory school, which for convenience Pat has attended alongside the boys.  But she is inclined to pranks, and her Aunt persuades Dr Hamilton that it is time Pat attended a girls' school.  He registers her at Whitehouse, and takes her on a visit to the area for a few days.  While exploring they come across Mr & Mrs Bryson cooking over a fire in the woods by their cottage, and accept the Brysons' invitation to join them for lunch.  Having opted not to join the Guides, she joins 'the gang', which is anti-Guides, but over time finds it becoming less satisfactory.  Pat is appointed a 'hare' on a hare and hounds race and is paired with a senior, Ella, and they head out cross-country - but during their lunch-stop, Ella reveals that she intends to go into the nearby town to the cinema, against the rules - but Pat refuses, and whilst alone, slips on a grass slope, turns her ankle, and can't walk on it . . .

1924 - H.B. Davidson - Peggy Pemberton, Brownie - Sheldon Press.  After living all her life abroad with her father, the Pembertons return to Britain - and as her father has to head to America on business shortly afterwards, ten year old Peggy was sent to live with relatives - her Uncle and Aunt, and her cousins Gladys and Betty.  One Saturday they drove the horse-cart to the local village, and Peggy spotted a group of Brownies, and meets a couple before she is called away.  Then, after a row with one of her cousins, she went for a walk to calm down, met up with a Brownie, and went to the Brownie meeting with her - she was just leaving when discovered by the family governess - the punishment given was that she could not attend Brownie meetings, so she decided to become a Brownie in secret . . .

1924 - Phyllis Hanley - Winning Her Way - Epworth Press.  Avis Yorke lives with her Aunt Amelia, Postmistress of Churchleigh, near Grimborough where Avis attends the Grimborough Girls' Secondary School.  Avis's father had gone to Canada hoping to take up farming, had opted to go to the Klondyke, and was on his way home when his ship went missing.  Unable to cope, his wife had ended up in a convalescent home, leaving Avis in Aunt Amelia's capable care.  The plan was for Avis to train as a Secondary teacher, but the Building Society her Aunt had invested her savings in had crashed, meaning Avis's sights had to be lowered to becoming a pupil-teacher.  Then she comes upon robbers at her Aunt's post office . . .

1924 - Nancy M. Hayes - The Plucky Patrol - Cassell.  The Curlew Patrol are the only Patrol in the Company, but long to have their first camp.  They try to get permission to camp on the Hall estate by the village of Perry, but Sir Howard Hale is opposed to Guides and refuses, so they rent land nearby, for 8 Guides and one Leader.  On departure day the discover that Captain's father is ill, and they will need to set off by themselves, and work out how to set up the camp as best they can . . .

1924 - Mrs A.C. Osborn Hann - Peg's Patrol - R.T.S.  A girls' club exists in a parochial hall in Walworth, London, technically run by Miss Peek, but in reality by their ringleader, Peg.  The new vicar proposes the opening of a Guide company, but though they know little about Guides, the ringleaders are not impressed with the idea.  The next week a visiting Guide company visit to give a demonstration, then at the infants' Christmas party there is an accident with a lighted candle, and Alice, a former Guide, knows what to do and does it.  This persuades Peg, and her friends follow - and the adventures begin . . .

1924 - Marjory Royce - Eileen the Lone Guide - Harrap.  Eileen Polmont lived in a London suburb - and had always wanted to be a Brownie and Guide, but had not had the chance before - though when her Navy Officer father returned from the war, her parents helped her with the skills for Tenderfoot and Second Class, so she would be ready if the chance came.  Then her father left the Navy and they moved to the country - and as there was no Guide Company there either, Eileen vowed to become a Lone Guide . . .

1924 - Ethel Talbot - Betty At St Benedick's - Nelson.  13-year-old Betty has, until recently, effectively been mother to her younger siblings, but now Aunt Frances has arrived, her father wants her to go to school and be a child rather than an adult.  She is the only new girl, the 33rd pupil.  With every other girl in the school already a Guide in one of the four Patrols, she is told that she cannot join the Guide Company, though she could be a Lone Guide if she wanted . . .

1925 - Christine Chaundler - Bunty Of The Blackbirds - The Children's Press.  Bunty Bevan - or Rosemary Marcella Bevan to be formal - was the pet and the butt of Form 4a at Mexton House School - as despite best intentions, whatever she tackled she was sure to put her foot in it before long.  The Blackbirds are the crack Patrol of the Company, so when Bunty announces that her mother has given her last-minute permission to go to the forthcoming Guide Camp, and Captain says she will allow it if Bunty passes her Second Class, the Blackbirds have little choice but start work on coaching such an unpromising candidate . . .

1925 - Winifred Darch - Gillian Of The Guides - Oxford University Press.  Gillian Berners is in the sixth form of Lynnaford High School, a Prefect and a PL in the Guide Company, and looking forward to the Company's forthcoming trip to Belgium - and a livewire, who has yet to be fully tamed.  She reckons herself the only likely candidate for Head Girl - but is she?

1925 - HB Davidson - Peggy's School Pack - Sheldon Press.  With their governess getting married earlier than planned, Peggy Pemberton and her cousin Betty are to head off to boarding school, and soon become involved in producing an idea for the pack's performance at the Brownie Revels . . .

1925 - H.B. Davidson - The Guides Make Good - Sheldon Press.  Kit and Phil Falconer have been brought up in India.  At fifteen they come to live with their Aunt, Lady Chalenor, during the holidays, and attend the small Heathergreen boarding school to complete their education, while their father stays with their ill mother at a Swiss sanatorium.  They find the tone of the school very half-hearted, with the pupils having little pride in it, so the new girls decide to set up a secret Guide Patrol . . .

1925 - Nancy M Hayes - Meg-All-Alone - Cassell.  Meg lives with her Aunt, Miss Grantham.  She was at boarding school until, when she was 13, her Aunt suddenly suffered money problems, and it became clear that her career hopes had to be laid aside in favour of studying shorthand and typing in the time remaining before leaving school at fourteen and starting in a works office.  She was a Guide, though she hadn't been able to persuade her fellow office juniors to join, so having left the school Guides, she was now a Lone Guide.  For a few days she had noticed a lonely-looking girl - then one day she spotted the girl wearing a Tenderfoot badge - so there was another Guide in town, and one who seemed to need help?

1925 - Katharine L. Oldmeadow - The Pimpernel Patrol - Collins.  At Miss Lamb's School For Girls, most of the pupils are out for fun.  One senior pupil, Georgina, would like to institute behavioural reform, but her 'Sisterhood Of St George' with it's vow to do splendid things for the sake of St George and England whilst putting down slang and the reading of cheap magazines was unlikely to appeal.  Meantime the Games Mistress is trying to bring discipline in her own way - through daily compulsory hockey practice sessions.  Then comes the bonfire night incident with the guy . . .

1925 - AC Osborn Hann - Rhoda The Rebel (reprinted as Rosemary The Rebel) - RTS.  Rosemary Sullivan lived with her father - and was employed by him.  He planned the burglaries and removed a pane of glass from the window, she wormed her way in and did the stealing.  She also played up in school, and around the area she lived in - Walworth, home of the 32nd Soythwark Guides.  One night she threw a handful of banger fireworks into their meeting hall, and though the Guiders weren't able to catch her, one of her classmates, Anne, recognised her - and is tasked by the Guiders with bringing her along the following week as a recruit . . .

1925 - AC Osborn Hann - Smiler A Girl Guide - Black.  Gwendolen Moran, known as Smiler, and her younger sister Gracie return from Guide camp to find that their hot-tempered father was threatening to 'do them in' on their return home if they tried to go in the door, so they headed round to the vicarage, where they are given use of the tent and camp fireplace the Rover Scouts have been using.  The next morning their father is still angry, and is lifted by the police, enabling the girls to go home.  The next day the Guide Captain goes with Smiler to the Labour Exchange, and she gets a job as a clerk in a department store.  But a jealous 'friend' would rather she lost the job . . .

1925 - Ethel Talbot - The Girls of the Rookery School - Nelson.  Peggy Hyland joins as a new pupil, and encounters the Rook Patrol, and is determined to join the Guides . . .

1925 - Elizabeth Walmsley - Mary Court's Company - Pilgrim Press.  Mary Court spots Janie and Violet stealing sweets from a stall in the crowded market square of the industrial town.  It's a poor glove-making town, and after school 13-year old Janie worked after school sewing in the finger tips of gloves ready for her mother to finish the seams.  Mary is a newcomer to the town, but sets about recruiting glove factory workers like Janie's elder sister Hetty, as well as the schoolgirls, to be Guides.  She invites some Guides from her old Company to set up a camp near the town, and to participate in the public meeting to launch the Guides - and Brownies, and Rangers - and to share in the adventures . . .

1926 - MC Carey - The Girl Guide's Book - Pearson.  A collection of articles, plays poems and stories.  Stories: The Amateur Detective, Passing The Love Of Women, An Experiment, The Foolish Adventure, A Ghostly Visitor, Water-Colours-A Rainbow Fantasy, and, Penelope The Practical.

1926 - HB Davidson - Geraldine, A Ranger - Nelson.  Geraldine Alcroft is leaving her home town to rent a room at her Aunt and Uncle's house, in order to take up a job in London as Assistant Cashier in a department store.  At her Aunt's house she meets her cousin, Minnie, albeit briefly as Minnie rushes in from work, quickly changes, then goes out until late.  She finds her fellow clerks aren't very friendly, and is lonely until one evening she spots a notice for a Ranger Company outside a Church Hall, and goes in - and bumps into a girl, Polly, whom she has seen on the bus when travelling to work.  Soon she is a member of the Fir Patrol, and involved in all sorts of activities . . .

1926 - H.B. Davidson - The Ardice Fortune - Sheldon Press.  Elsie Hutton planned to join the new Guide Company, being started by Miss Carter, who had recently come to live in Oldgate.  She had left school to keep house for her father, whose business was struggling, but Miss Carter assured her he wouldn't mind her having one night out each week.   She had just come home from her first meeting when her father told her that he'd had exciting news - his father had lent money to a Mr Ardice some years ago to set up a business abroad - the business had made a fortune, and now that old Mr Hutton had died, his will stated the fortune was to be split between his son and Mr Hutton, a condition being that they live with Mr Ardice while the business affairs are sorted.  On arriving they meet Mr Fred Ardice, and his cousin Jack.  Days pass and Fred Ardice seems in no hurry to get down to business - meantime Elsie's suspicions grow, especially when she is suddenly sent away to boarding school . . .

1926 - Brenda Girvin - June The Girl Guide - Oxford University Press.  June was a young Guide, recently enrolled - with the Guide meeting having finished early four of the Guides opt to go blackberrying in the wood, and invite June with them.  Becoming slightly separated from the rest, she notices a previously empty old house is now occupied, and the lady, looking over the fence, invites June in to pick flowers.  June notices that Mrs Webber has been crying, and she explains that the Doctors recommend that her daughter Rachel go to a home at Davos for her health - But Mrs Webber doesn't have the money.  The old caretaker had given her a pottery pot which has a legend attached - that if the pot were put under a rose tree in the garden of that house on the fifteenth of September, and a Webber was in need, the pot would contain the money needed . . .

1926 - Phyllis Hanley - Girls Grit - Sharp.  The town of Blackington is bleakly industrial, with Collieries and cotton mills.  Aimee Fosbrooke lived there, having left school at fifteen when her mother died, to look after her younger siblings Fred, 13, Ethel, 11, and Christine, 7.  Their heartbroken father died three years later, leaving scant savings.  Aimee turned her skill at needlework to good effect, becoming a dressmaker, Combined with selling the farm to move to a small house in town, Aimee made ends meet, and aided by Ethel's scholarship was able to keep her in school, and then into a typist job at the local mill.  Christine was at school and had become a Girl Guide.  One Saturday Aimee was walking through the woods to Gipsy Hall to deliver a dress when she found her path blocked by a local ruffian, who tried to grab her.  Christine and her Patrol were practicing stalking nearby, and on seeing her sister impeded, Christine wielded her stave, delivering first one blow on his back, then another on the back of his head . . .

1926 - F.O.H. Nash - Some Brownies and a Boggart - Sheldon Press.  A new Brownie Pack starts at Monks Verney, and Alison Murray, one of the Sixers, enjoys the pack's adventures.

1926 - Mrs A.C. Osborn Hann - The Pluck of The Coward - A&C Black.  Hope Chittenden, an orphan, lives with her Aunt and Uncle. Mrs and Mr Pincher, and their lazy, spoilt daughter, Ermyntrude.  Though Mr Pincher was vaguely kind to his niece, Mrs Pincher employed Hope as a skivvy.  Hope's teacher suggests that she should try for a scholarship, with the possibility of gaining a place at college - but her Aunt is determined that Hope will leave school on the earliest possible date, and take the first job going.  She gets a piecework job in a factory, shelling Brazil nuts at twopence a pound for whole kernels, working at a table with Emma, Jessie, Flossie and Liza.  Emma is a Guide, and looks after Hope, but Jessie, Flossie and Liza are not so kind.  Then Emma persuades Hope to go to Guides with her . . .

1926c - Elsie J Oxenham & Jessie Leckie Herbertson - Girls' Patrol Book - Collins.  Contains two short stories: Jen's Presents, and, Hidden Treasure, 

1926 - Mrs John G Rowe - The Girl Guides of St Ursula's - Pilgrim Press.  Twins Ella and Brenda Bright arrive at St Ursula's Select Academy for Young Ladies, and soon prove to be livewires - nevertheless, they join the Guide Company . . .

1927 - Winifred Darch - Cicely Bassett Patrol Leader - Oxford University Press.  Cicely lives with her father, elder sister Helen, younger sister Mirth, and Mirth's twin brother Mike.  She is in the sixth form at Quenton High School, and is a Patrol Leader in the High School Company.  It is announced that the High School's long-serving headmistress is retiring, and a new headmistress, with artistic ideas, has been appointed from next term.  Several of the school staff - including both Guiders - opt to resign at the end of term; the new headmistress brings several of her own staff - and also 20 boarders, though the High is a day school.  On holiday in Rouen, Helen and Cicely meet a school group at their accommodation.  The school wear matching loose djibbah frocks, wide floppy panama hats with blue scarves, thin grey-blue woollen stockings and sandals.  Each girl has the exact same hairstyle - bobbed straight all round with a long fringe over the forehead - and are all vegetarian.  That evening, after vegetarian dinner at the boarding house with Miss Popham and her pupils, Helen and Cicely are hungry, so go to a nearby restaurant - there they see two of the schoolgirls sneak in unescorted - and eat a full meal, including the fish and meat courses.  On the boat home, Cicely and Vanna, one of the schoolgirls, end up on a different boat to Helen and the school party.  They discover that next term, Miss Popham is to be the new Head of Quenton High, and is likely to bring a number of her ideas with her, including the school parliament and her 'Society of Torchbearers' . . .

1927 - HB Davidson - Bridget And The Dragon - Nelson.  The Long Gretton Guides are off on their first camp.  Next to their camping field is a thatched cottage, owned by a Miss Jenkins, a stern elderly lady, who disapproves of the camp . . .

1927 - H.B. Davidson - Jerry and Joan - Sheldon Press.  Joan's father is unwell, and sent to a sanatorium abroad, and while her mother accompanies him, Joan is sent to live with her Aunt Clara, Uncle Dick, and Cousin Jerry.  There she discovers that Jerry is a Cub, she discovers that Brownies meet in the same building, and she gets permission to join . . .

1927 - Phyllis Hanley - Bridget of the Guides - Epworth Press.  The new Curate of Parkleigh set up a Boy Scout Troop - and such was the pressure from their sisters that his wife called a meeting about setting up Guides.  Most of the girls who were eligible turned up - as did a middle-aged woman, Bridget O'Connell, who expressed her determination to become a Guide.  With the lady determined, and no clear reason to refuse, her name was added to the list.  Patrol Leader O'Connell was one of the keenest Guides in the Company - and a lively addition to the Parkleigh Guides' ranks . . .

1927 - Nancy M. Hayes - The Guides at Calamity Hill - Cassell.  Joan Henderson and her friends in the Wild Rose Patrol in Bruton, is bored.  At the meetings in their hall they learn the knots and signalling and first aid - but had never been on a hike.  Miss Florden's thoughts had turned to going away in the summer - she had advertised "for rooms for nine in a quiet farm, with country comforts and cooking."  When Joan ventures "we couldn't possibly camp out there?"  her Captain advises "Camping is rather rough for people like ourselves, who have been brought up in towns.  Some year we will certainly make up our minds to go, but now we will just have a nice quiet country time - reading, and picking wild flowers, and getting ahead with needlework and our hobbies, without the rough work of cooking, pitching tents, and so on.  After all, what do we know about camping?"   So they gathered at the station, suitcases in hand.  When they finally arrived at the remote station, there was no transport, and the porter advised that their destination of Stone Farm was known to locals as Calamity Farm.  The porter eventually managed to arrange a rickety dray.  They find that farmer and his son had been struck down with flu, the maid had quit for fear of catching it, and there was no bedroom, just a hay barn to sleep in.  The farmer's wife begs them to stay, as they are behind in the rent and with both menfolk ill, there is no-one to harvest the hay or see to the livestock . . .

1927 - Margaret Middleton - The Guide Camp at Herons Bay - Blackie.  The Company's campsite is not available at a week's notice, and everywhere else is booked up.  with transport and equipment booked they were loath to cancel, so one of the Guiders heads down to the area to hunt for possible sites, and succeeds in finding a site at Heron's Bay, and getting permission from the landowner, who locals see as odd and mysterious . . .

1927 - Dorothea Moore - Brenda Of Beech House - Collins.  Princess Brenda of Nystrea is sick of her restricted life with her governess and servants - especially with the prospect of her brother going away to boarding school in England, leaving her even more alone.  Spending the Easter break at the summer palace. Brenda and her brother meet a family of picnickers and discover that the daughters attend Beech House School in England.  That night at dinner, her father King Conrad advises that, after all, she is to go to school - she is due to start next term - at Beech House . . .

1927 - AC Osborn Hann - Peg Lieutenant - RTS.  Peg is involved in an accident with a lorry, ending up pinned against a wall by it, and after six weeks in hospital, is told that she will be unable to work for two years.  She is sent from London to live with her Uncle and Aunt, and young cousins Beattie, Jane and Horry in Somerset, far from her London frends and Fiance Bert.  Peg meets the Rector's wife Mrs Fortescue and her daughter Daphne.  Mrs Fortescue is planning to start Guides in the village, and wants Peg to be her Lieutenant . . .

1927 - Mrs A.C. Osborn Hann - The Sunshine Shop - A&C Black.  Sheila, Bertha, Pixie, Lucy, Winnie, Norah and Aggie form the Shamrock Patrol and are looking forward to the start of term.  Sheila, the Patrol Leader, lives with her mother above the fish shop they run - her father lived there some of the time, but at other times he disappeared for days or weeks - nevertheless Sheila and her mother keep cheery faces on whilst working in the shop.  Together the Shamrock Patrol have adventures . . .

1927 - Maud Rowe - The Guides Of Pexton School - RTS.  The Guides of Pexton House Girls' School are playing a tracking game on their half-holiday - and the Daffodils opt to go into Morby Caves, enabling them to spot and catch approaching attackers of the Blackbird Patrol.  But whilst hiding silently in the pitch-black cave, they realise the figure they hear approaching is an adult not a Guide - and as he slips into the cave past them, his lantern does not give away the Guides' presence, and unaware, he goes through to an inner cavern and is heard moving stones around - then emerges carrying a knapsack under his arm - and from the light of his lantern they get a glimpse of his face and outfit . . .

1927 - Margaret Stuart Lane - Tales for the Brownies - Oxford University Press.  A selection of short stories, some written by Ms Lane and others selected: The Sorrowful Adventure of the Sing-Song Man, The Smuggler's Cave and Francis Drake, Poor Tom, One Christmas Eve, The Shepherd's Cloak, That Good Turn for Farmer Brown, How Scarlet Comb the Cock Defended the Right, The Bear Called Ben, The Secret of the Road, The Wonder-Wonder Who Built a Little House, Jacky and Some Others, The Frost Child, The Tale of John Dietrich, and, The Lost Dream.

1927 - Ethel Talbot - Jan At Island School - Jim and Jan's father has been declared bankrupt, and with him determined to pay back the debt, the offer of a boarding pupil-teacher place at The Island School on quarter fees is an offer which delights Jan.  Boarding school on an island, Guides - and the possibility of Sea Guides once she turns 16 . . .

1927 - Ethel Talbot - Jill, Lone Guide - Ward Lock.  Since Aunt Agatha's death a month ago, Harry and Jill had stayed on in Columbine Villa, Jill keeping house while Harry was out at work.  Now the villa was re-let, and Harry had taken rooms for them to move into.  Then the night before the move they receive a letter from their Aunt's cousin offering Jill a home.  Jill is at first inclined to refuse - but then thinks of her brother's fiance Ethne - they must be keen to be married, but Harry could not earn enough to keep them both, nor did she feel she could stand in the way of their getting married any longer - so she accepts Aunt Deborah's offer, , leaves a note for Harry to say where she has gone, and travels early next morning to Midsum.  But when she gets to The Grange, the buttler advises that Miss Barrett had taken suddenly ill, and died at midnight.  Jill walks away, homeless . . .

1927 - Various - The Second Trail Of The Girl Guides - Blackwell Books.  An 'annual' type book, second in the series.  Stories are: A Snowflake In The Wilderness, The Grig, Mademoiselle Maria Gloria, Mates, The Saving Of Castle Malcolm, Excalibur, Coppinger's Cave, Katug The Snow Child, and, Freeze.

1928 - Elinor M. Brent-Dyer - Judy, The Guide - Nelson.  Judy Carey lived on a ranch in Canada, her Godfather offered her a scholarship to St Ronan's School in England.  There she joins the Guides.  She experiences discrimination, is falsely accused of theft, and ostracized - until . . .

1928 - Catherine Christian - Greenie And The Pink 'Un - RTS.  Avril Delawny lives with her Aunt and Uncle.  Her mother died a few months ago and her father has been away in Russia for almost a decade, and hasn't been heard from for two years, other than one brief scrawled note advising that he had escaped to Siberia and intended to head home - but that was many months ago.  Misunderstood by her Aunt and Uncle, realising that they don't think her father is coming home, and determined not to live on their charity, she runs away.  Seeing a group of Guides swimming at a nearby beach, she lifts one of the neatly-folded uniforms, hides behind a bush, and changes into it.  Thus disguised, she catches the train to London, in search of her father . . .

1928 - EE Cowper - Camilla's Castle - Blackie.  Camilla Carmichael had placed a newspaper advertisement - "Romantic family require habitable ancient castle in any part of Europe, preferably on sea; limited income." with contact details.  They receive a response offering "Le Camp Geffroy", built AD 900.  Within a fortnight the family home was let out and the Carmichael family were catching the boat-train to the continent, and adventure . . .

1928 - Edna Lake - The Mystery Of Tower House School - Warne.  Patrol Leaders Margaret Withers and Jane Roberts head to the old coach house of the school - recently converted into a club-room for the school Guide Company.  Though the room is kept secured and the whereabouts of the only two keys can be vouched for, Patrol property belonging to various Patrols has been going missing . . .

1928 - Mrs A.C. Osborn Hann - Peg the Ranger - R.T.S.  Peg has been PL of the Daffodils for over three years, and now she is over 16, is persuaded to give Rangers a try.  She joins the Scarlet Pimpernell Patrol and joins in with their adventures . . .

1928 - Mrs A.C. Osborn Hann - Captain Peg - RTS.  Peg's marriage has been delayed, meantime the Guide Captain she has been acting as Lieutenant to - Mrs Fortescue - is again being asked to take on the District Commissioner role.  With her private life on hold, Peg reluctantly agrees to step up to Captain in order to free Mrs Fortescue to take on the new role.  They decide to enter the local County Challenge Cup competition for Second-Class Guides, and start training the two Guides chosen towards it . . .

1928 - Margaret Stuart Lane - Joan of the Brownies - Oxford University Press.  Joan Meredith lives in Smuggler' Cottage in Cornwall with her father and grandmother.    She befriends the shrimp girl, takes part in a gardening competition, On a pack picnic she became separated from the rest, and in climbing onto a boulder, it tipped, and she found herself dropping into a hidden cave below . . .

1928 - Sibyl B Owsley - An Absent Minded Schoolgirl - Shaw.  Rosemary Lingard of the sixth form of St Monica's School, at the urging of her mother and headmistress, opts to transfer to the school's domestic science annexe, for a year's training.  An absent-minded dreamer, and with no experience of domestic subjects, she is not a natural for domestic science.  She discovers her fellow students are a livewire bunch, who take Rosemary punting, camping - and persuade her to join the Cadets . . .

1928 - Sybil Owsley - The Guides of North Cliff - Blackie.  Lorna Drake joins her cousin Dorothea at North Cliff school but, already being 16, and having a mature outlook from having lived exclusively with adults, she finds it difficult to fit in.  Her decision not to join Guides further alienates her - those who do not join are treated as outsiders . . .

1928 - Ethel Talbot - Ranger Rose - Nelson.  Rose had loved her school, especially hockey and cricket.  But during a 'rag' - hanging a banner on the gym roof in support of the hockey team.  The result had been almost a year of lying flat, and now some short walks only.  Then it was off to school - a new school.  But with so much she would have to sit out of, what would that be like?

1928 - Various - Girl Guide Stories - Nelson.  Sisters - Skins And All, Last Night In Camp, Kathie-Angela Lone Guide, Crusoes Up-To-Date, Lennie's Wild Animals, and, The Money In The Mustard Tin.

1928 - Various - The Guides' Kit Bag - John F Shaw.  Compendium of short stories - Self-Sufficient Cynthia, The Perfect Patrol, The Imp, The Hike In Goblin Coombe, Uniforms Off, and, An Unofficial Guide.

1928 - Various - The Second Trail Of The Girl Guides - Blackwell Books.  An 'annual' type book, second in the series.  Stories are: Patricia Comes Home, Sally In Our Alley, The Key, The Lady's Prisoner, Vendetta, The Wrist-Watch Castaways, A Gentleman Of Burgundy, The Story Of Mr Bell, and, My Hat.

1928 - Madge Torrence White - Chum-The New Recruit - Warne.  Gerry Gorden has found a new recruit for the Robin Patrol of 10th Westwell - Elizabeth Chumleigh, known to her friends as Chum - and she has joined just in time for camp.  The camp is at Cliffdon, on land owned by the Squire, and is to be joint with 8th Westwell, a Company from a poorer area whose own camp had to be cancelled due to their Captain's fractured ankle.  Chum lived with Nanny, and had never known her parents.  Now, Nanny decides that Elizabeth is old enough to hear her story - that her mother had been an orphan who lived with Nanny and a guardian during her schooldays and was then sent abroad - where she sent word that she had met and married an Army Major called Chumleigh Graham.  Days before World War 1 broke out, Nanny answered the door to find an army officer carrying a baby wrapped in a blanket - Elizabeth.  The Major said that her mother had died when she was one, her name was Elizabeth Chumleigh Graham after both of her parents - but advised leaving off Graham from her name.  He asked Nanny to look after her, left half of a sketch map, and said he would be gone for a week.  He didn't come back.  She and Gerry agreed to work together to try and trace both Chumleigh Graham - and the meaning of the map . . .

1929 - K.N. Abbott - The Camp at Sea View Meadow - Blackie.  Vera Lucas is surprised to see her schoolfriend Jean in Witheringlea - she knew Jean was heading off to Guide camp, but didn't realise it was on her Uncle's land.  Things on her Uncle's farm aren't so good this year - there has been a falling-out with the neighbour over new-fangled farming practices and straying livestock, and locals have sided with the neighbour.  The Guides determine to try to find the livestock and resolve the dispute . . .

1929 - HB Davidson - Jane The Determined - Nelson.  After her father marries one of her old classmates from school, Jane Weaver decides to move into her Aunt Emma's house 100 miles away in Shipdale, and get a job - so she does.  Her new employer, bookseller Mr Pennybright, soon sees her potential and encourages her to enrol in evening classes; she also joins Guides.  Her future is looking bright - but on her return from Guide Camp the blow fell . . .

1929 - Margaret C Field - Cecile At St Clare's - Warne.  Cecile Benson, daughter of an explorer the head knew some years ago, has arrived at St Clare's School, only an hour after the letter from her father arrived, advising that she was expelled from her own school, her mother is dead, her old nurse is off to Canada, so he is sending her to St Clare's on the spot, part-way through summer term.  Cecile refuses to tell the head, Miss Moore, which her previous school was.  Given the lack of information, Miss Moore does not feel she can let Cecile mix with her pupils, so she is sent to an attic room, and put on her honour to stay there until she reconsiders . . .

1929 - Margaret Middleton - The Guide Adventurers - Blackie.  Deborah, Penelope, Mary and Bridget debate whether one can live on twelve-and-six a week, so they go off to camp for a fortnight, living entirely on that funding and the equipment they take.  They organise a lift on the back of a lorry, and head off towards the country in search of adventure . . .

1929 - FOH Nash - Merrie Brandon - Warne.  Merrie Brandon is not a popular girl in Hengestbury School, due to her tendency to put fun before sense.  She also refuses to talk of her old school, St Jerome's, or why she left it.  Then a new girl arrives at Hengestbury who used to go to St Jerome's while Merrie was there . . .

1929 - Mrs A.C. Osborn Hann - Peg And Her Company - R.T.S.  Peg and her new husband Bert live in a country cottage, and Peg is Captain of the local Guides.  It's a small country, which has been running in a short time.  A new Guide, Angela, joins - with four service stars and a lot of confidence - but for all her badges, she shows signs of being less than honest . . .

1929 - AC Osborn Hann - Peg Junior - RTS.  Peg's daughter, Peggy, is now a Brownie, and involved in all the pack's fun . . .

1929 - Sibyl B Owsley - A Make-Believe Brownie - Nelson.  Barbara is much younger than her brother and sister, and has spent her nine years 'wrapped in cotton wool' in case she might catch an illness or injury,. She isn't allowed to join Brownies for fear she might catch Mumps or Measles from the other girls.  Finally the elder children persuade her mother to accept an offer to visit Italy, while Barbara goes to stay with her Aunt Mildred and Uncle Harry, and cousins Ron, Stephen, Tim, Nicholas and Robina, on their farm.  There she has various adventures whilst trying to live by the Brownie Promise even if she can't yet make it . . .

1929 - May Wynne - The Guide's Honour - Warne.  Evebell Scrayne joins Bisford House School, with fellow new girl Angela Flenton, both Guides.  They meet Miss Laurent the Guide Captain, and outgoing Angela is soon quizzing her about Guides, discovering that a camp is being held in the holidays - at Sattlesbury-on-sea.  Miss Laurent notices that Evebell has gone white at the news.  Nina discovers that the Scraynes left Sattlesbury suddenly, and determines to find out why . . .

1930 - E.M. Channon - Her Second Chance - Nisbet.  The Headmistress of St Madern's, Miss Pember, has a sudden vacancy for a modern languages mistress, and plans to interview the only candidate with any potential - Margaret Monsal.  Looking at the newspaper, she spots that a former pupil, Anita Lyon, had died in an accident, aged 25 - and that Sir Isaac Salmon, father of Anita's cousin Rita Salmon, had left a vast sum in his will, presumably to his only child.  Anita had been expelled, and Rita had, under Anita's instructions, gone to St Madern's with the express intention of ruining the school in revenge - and had nearly succeeded.  When Miss Monsal arrives for interview, she reveals that she is Rita Salmon.  She has found out that her father's fortune was ill-gotten, has spent what she can of it, and wants to earn her own living - and regrets that she took revenge on Anita's behalf only to later find out that Anita's expulsion was fully justified.  She now claims to want to make good on what she did before, and begs a second chance . . .

1930 -- Winifred Darch - The Lower Fourth And Joan - Oxford University Press.  Following her father's sudden death Joan Miller's future is uncertain - she didn't win the scholarship to the High School, and her Aunt and Uncle have doubts that her elder brother can make the mill pay, so there is no money for school fees.  Then it is discovered that a trust fund could be applied for which could fund her education at the high; she is granted it on the chair's casting vote - but one of those opposing is Mrs Billing, mother of Chloris.  Chloris failed to get into the exclusive local private school, so is also joining the High - Mrs Billing isn't happy at the thought of her girl mixing with scholarship and charity girls . . .

1930c - HB Davidson - Bunch, A Brownie - Blackie.  Victoria Beatrice Meadowbrow, known as Bunch, lived on the estate of Rexborough Hall, where her father was Head Chauffeur, near her best friend Mabel Penrose, known as Micky.  Both are keen Brownies and excited at the prospect of a visit to a nearby school to see some plays and then go boating on the lake . . .

1930 - H.B. Davidson - The Castle Tea-Garden - Sheldon.  Aunt Cora Malcolm has sailed back from the USA, on hearing that her niece's father is terminally ill, and meets sisters Vera, Teddy and Judy at their home - as it formed part of their father's medical practice, it was being sold.  Aunt Cora suggests that they move to the country and open a tea-garden - she and Vera could work in it full time; Teddy and Judy could help after school and at weekends.  They find a suitable house in Kent, in the village of Burnham Castle and open up their business.  But something seems to be keeping potential customers away . . .

1930 - Dorothea Moore - Judy, Patrol Leader - Collins.  Judy Bethune is an orphan, living in the Orkney Islands.  Her Uncle, Mr James Bethune, is Latin Master at St Oswyth's Boarding School in Merchester and lodges in a house near the school.  Returning from school he finds the niece on the doorstep and expecting to stay - the lady she has been living with has had to move abroad suddenly.  So Judy has arrived, with every intention of acting as her Uncle's housekeeper despite there being no vacancy, and the next morning early, she enters the school grounds by means of climbing over the wall, then the school itself by climbing onto the porch, up a fire-escape ladder, round the ledge and in a window which was slightly open . . .

1930 - Mrs A C Osborn Hann - Ten Little Brownie Girls - RTS.  Gay and Annie live in Great Burrington, and when a Brownie pack is started Gay is made Elf Sixer - and they have even more fun when they go on Pack Holiday . . .

1930 - Mrs A.C. Osborn Hann - What The Brownies Did - Lutterworth Press.  IvyJoan has a new baby brother, Brian, and is visited by her urban friend, Terry, who joins her at Brownies . . .

1930 - Diana Pares - The Hawthorn Patrol - Blackie.  The Hawthorn clan move into a new house - Mr and Mrs Hawthorn, their daughters Evelyn, Beatrix, Daphne, Jocelyn and Cherry - and their orphaned cousins Constance and Audrey.  The Captain visits, and as she feels the existing Patrols wouldn't like new recruits, they agree to join as a ready-made Patrol, and find the Guide Company very slack.  They set out on a mission to improve the meeting hall, and thus the Guides . . .  

1930 - Tess Peppard - Seven Robins - The Sheldon Press.  The Robin Patrol of the 1st Glenalyn Guides all live in the same village outside Glenalyn, and the book tells of their good turns.

1930 - Isabel Pike - At The Grey Farm - RTS.  While their parents are on holiday, Olga and Denie are staying with their mother's old Nurse, Mrs Bunce.  As a bedtime story she tells them an old story about nearby Bruckendale Hall, and how they are poor now because the family's treasure was lost in the English Civil War, after the young squire was killed, his cousin moved in but could not find the treasure . . .

1930 - Various - Collins' Girl Guides' Annual - Collins.  An annual of short stories and articles.  Stories: The Story Of Deirdre, Smugglers' Den, The Lost Bells, La Fleurette Of The Shadows, The Two Pools, In The Dead Of Night, The Lost Darning Needle, The Swimming Relay, Gannets For The King, Buried Above Ground, An Adventurous Christmas Eve, and, A Test For Tenderfoots.

1930 - May Wynne - Bobbety the Brownie - Warne.  Beryl Lyndon, known to her family as Bobbety, has recently become a Brownie, and is asked by her mother to go away to a friend's house for the summer and share lessons with the children, Alan and Tessa - as Mr and Mrs Lyndon have to go to France for three months.  She gets on well with Alan, who hopes to join Scouts soon, but finds Tessa much harder to get along with, as she always wants her own way.  Then comes the incident with Joe's broken leg . . .

1931 - Catherine Christian - Cherries in Search of a Captain - Blackie.  1st Westbury Guides have a problem.  That they have got through three Captains in five months isn't their fault, but would limit the prospects of finding another - but the situation is worsened by their losing their headquarters to structural problems.  Add the opening of the Manor School, whose closed-sponsored Guide Company would take all of the Guides who were pupils there but none who were not - and from 5 Patrols the 1st Westbury was reduced overnight to 5 Guides, with neither Guiders nor premises.  Patrol Leader Cherry Fielding and Patrol Second Petronella Harcourt of the Scarlet Pimpernells, Jessie and Violet King of the Poppies, and their Cousin, Lottie King of the Sunflowers.  The Commissioner agrees to them working as a Lone Patrol, and suggests the Leaders read up the copy of the first Guide handbook which the founding Captain of the company had gifted to it.

1931 - Vera Marshall - The Quest of the Sleuth Patrol - Cassell.  Meriel Mardon and Gabrielley Lancaster - or Merry and Gay and Gay's brother Robin, live with Gay and Robin's Aunt Maud.  Robin was due to inherit a large estate when his father died - unless father's long-lost cousin turned up - and as Robin had no desire to run an estate, he hoped Cousin Edgar might be found.  Having been taught by a governess, this term Merry and Gay start at Ravensdale School, and start researching into Cousin Edgar's possible whereabouts, aided by their Guide friends . . .

1931 - Violet M. Methley - The Windmill Guides - Blackie.  Flooded out of their camp on the first night, next morning the two Patrols and their Guider move their soggy gear to a nearby empty windmill.  The owner allowed them use of the lower three floors of it, but not the top floor, the hatch to which she kept locked.  Searching for an item of lost property, one of the Guides touches the hatch lid, and it falls open . . .

1931 - Margaret Middleton - Three Girls And A Car - Blackie.  Unity Avon's Aunt has died, and left an unusual bequest.  She has been left £100 but certain conditions apply - namely that she has to spend a minimum of 20 days at her Aunt's old house in Avoch-av-Ord in north Scotland.  With permission from her parents she invests the £100 in a second-hand car, and accompanied by her classmates, sisters Noel and Jane, they head north from London, car laden with camping equipment for their overnight stops.  As they travel, they wonder about the will's strange contents . . .

1931 - FOH Nash - Audrey The Sea Ranger - Sheldon Press.  While their house is having an extension built, Audrey with her father and stepmother move into a house at the coast, at Heathmoor Bay.  This enables Audrey to link up with two friends who are staying there, and join their Sea Ranger 'Ship' over the summer holidays - and become involved in their adventures . . .

1931 - F.O.H. Nash - Kattie of the Balkans - Warne.  Bunnie Cooter, Peggy Newcome, and Kattie Ilieff from Silaria, are pupils at St Cecilia's school and members of the Guide Company.  Bunnie was due to go home for the holidays, and during the break attend Guide Camp with her home Guide Company, and Peggy was joining her.  On hearing that Kattie would not be able to travel back to Silaria for the holidays, Bunnie had invited her for the holidays, little realising the adventures that would lead to . . .

1931 - AC Osborn Hann - Peg's Babies - RTS.  Peg is now married with two children - Peggy, 6, and David, 5, and they have fun in the country . . .

1931 - Doris Pocock - The Kengarth Brownies - Nisbet.  Gwen Hamilton lives with her elderly Grandmother and Aunts, and older (and rather staid) Cousin, while her parents are in India.  As a livewire, her life is a round of being told 'don't'.  Hanging around the railway halt, she saw the arrival of Cicely's friend Connie Cameron, home for the school holidays.  Crossing the level crossing to go home, she slipped, and fell just as the train was approaching.  Connie, being a Guide, urged her to lie between the rails until the train passed, then treated her for shock.  Visiting that night, Connie offers to help with occupying Gwen.  She sets up a Brownie pack - and challenges Cecily to take it over after the holidays . . .

1931 - Madge S. Smith - Guide Margery or The Real Thing - Oxford University Press.  Margery Acland comes to live with her cousin Bridget Swayne and her family - both are Guides, though Bridget is more keen and more advanced, having gained many badges.  Margery's Guide attendance has been more patchy, partly due to her mother's illness, and her unit put less attention on badges and more on other Guide activities.  Bridget and her friends discover Margery's sewing skills, and rope her into their scheme to secretly 'adopt' a local poor child and make clothes for her.  Then their good turn is discovered . . .

1931 - May Wynne - Girls Of The Pansy Patrol - Aldine Publishing Company.  When Captain Arden announces the venue of the 1st Benleigh Company's next camp, every girl is thrilled bar one.  Jessamy Barson knows there is a family secret around Bargellan Woods and the landowner, Sir Ramon Tarrall.  When her parents hear they let her into the family secret - that their family name is Tarrall, she is actually Sir Ramon's granddaughter, and there was a scandal involving one of Sir Ramon's two sons, and her father was blamed and could not prove it was his brother.  But, if she goes to camp, maybe Jessamy could find the evidence . .   ?

1932 - Christine Chaundler - Jill Of The Guides - Nisbet.  Jill Harlow comes home from her first day at high school desperately keen to join Guides, but Jill had been delicate, and her mother considered school and homework to be strain enough on Jill's health for now. One of the Patrol Leaders suggests that rather than irritate their mothers with pleading, Jill and her friend Irma should seek to win permission by showing good results at school.  This works for Irma, but Jill's mother isn't persuaded . . . 

1932 - H.B. Davidson - Belle Joins the Brownies - Blackie.  Nine-year-old Belle Clarke lived in a children's home, and one evening was summoned to the Matron's room and received her first visitor, a Miss Dickson.  Miss Dickson was to be her new Auntie, and they would live in a house in the country in a fortnight's time.  On arrival she meets neighbouring children Jill and Tony.  Jill's mother invites Belle to go with them to Brownies . . .

1932 - H.B. Davidson - The Makeshift Patrol - Sheldon Press.  The Skylark Patrol head off to camp in Sussex, with two borrowed Guiders.  They camp in a field next to the Smuggler's Inn, reputed to be haunted, 

1932 - Dorothea Moore - Sara To The Rescue - Nisbet.  Sara Seven, an orphan, has lived with her late Aunt's landlady since Aunt Amelie died, and works for Mrs Jennings to make up for the limited rent she is able to pay.  On the way to post her resignation from Guides on account of her having to work more hours, she bumps into a girl asking directions to Paddington Station, and as the girl is foreign and seems to know nothing of London, and time is short to meet the train, she opts to escort the strange girl by bus.  On arrival at the station and heading towards the train, an elderly lady dashes forward, grabs the foreign girl's case and asks if she is Sara - as soon as she confirms the lady dashes off, and as they approach a train the porter pushes all three of them aboard, and before Sara or the foreign girl can protest, the door is closed and it is on the move, headed for Cornwall . . .

1932 - AC Osborn Hann - June Runs The Company - Shaw.  June receives a copy of Girl Guiding for her birthday but, not really having heard of Guides, after a glance isn't much impressed, so takes the book to Alice, a sixteen-year-old disabled friend.  Next time June visits Alice is excited to share the things she discovered in the book - the stalking, camping, firelighting and first aid.  Equally excited, June writes to Guide Headquarters to ask how to set up a Guide Company in the village, and without worrying about the rulebook, sets up a Company with herself as Leader . . .

1932 - AC Osborn Hann - What Happened To Peg - RTS.  The final story in the 'Peg' series sees Peg suffering a series of misfortunes, and drama in the Guide Drama Cup Competition . . .

1932 - Sibyl B Owsley - The School That Was Different - Shaw.  Miss Hermione Glynn has spent the past ten years bringing up her late brother's children since their mother's death.  Now all the elder children are settled in careers or training for them, and the youngest ready to leave school soon and take over the running of the house - and Miss Glynn realises that she is about to be at a loose end.  Now is the chance to take up the career she laid aside a decade ago.  But she didn't want to be a teacher working under someone else's ways - instead she finds a run-down day school and takes on the task of transforming it - buildings, teachers, and pupils - including starting Guides . . .

1932 - Sybil Owsley/Mrs A.C. Osborn Hann - Brownie Revels - John F. Shaw Publishers.  A collection of short stories - A Great Big Adventure, Ten Little Brownie Girls, Boggart or Brownie, Brownie Revels, The Changing of Philippa, This Brownie Business, Lend A Hand, and, The Brownie Who Lost Things.

1932c - Various - Thrilling Stories Of Girl Guides - Nelson.  Short story collection.  Stories: Curly And Co In Camp, The Rival Camps, The C3 Rangers, Tinker's Luck, Helping Hawkins, Sheila's Second Thought, The Famous Four Of St Margaret's, Moira The Muddler, and, Guides On Guard.

1932 - U.M. Williams - For Brownies - Harrap.  A selection of games, and stories: The Little Brown Goat And The Magic Pea, Mushrooms, Canary-Bird, The Story Of The Silver Birch-Tree, Plumpy Cat, The Blue Wizard, Princess Jemima And Her Baby Dragon, King Kelpie, The Story Of The Twins, The Badge That Ran Away, The Dragon Who Had Hay-Fever, and, Tavi Of Gold.

1933 - H.B. Davidson - Sea Ranger of the "Rodney" - Sheldon Press.  Mary Rose had kept house for her miner father in Staffordshire, ever since her Aunt left them to be married - then her father was killed in a pit accident, and within a fortnight the furniture had been sold and she caught the train to her Aunt's house in Sussex.  During a power cut she meets up with a group of friends who are planning to start a Sea Ranger crew.  With a few months before their Skipper can start, they make a start on swimming lessons, rope-work, and getting out in rowing boats with the lobster fishermen . . .

1933c - Sybil Owsley - A Madcap Brownie - Blackie.  Moppy's younger brother Wriggles is preparing to head off to Wolf Cub Camp, and Moppy finds it unfair that she doesn't get to go to camp.  Then she realises that her fellow Elves, Iris and Ann, usually spent the school holidays in their family's cottage in Urchin Bay, near the site of the Cub Camp, so she asks them if she can go with them, and have a camp of their own.  Iris and Ann's mother agrees, and Moppy starts planning adventures . . .

1933 - Ethel Talbot - Anne-On-Her-Own - Ward Lock.  Anne Heriot, a keen Ranger, has been looking after her widowed invalid mother, with the help of money sent by her married elder brother keeping the family finances afloat while she finished secretarial college as top student.  Newly graduated, her search for a job leads to a post at the Brimsham Hosiery Company, far away enough to require her living in a hostel, but with her younger sister ready to take over caring for mother, Anne is able to accept the job offer, and take a room at a hostel for girls in the town.  On her arrival at the hostel, the night before she is due to start work, she finds a letter waiting for her from the hosiery company - they had merged with a rival, and there was no longer a post for her.  Not wanting to upset her mother, but knowing her meagre savings won't pay hostel fees long, Anne faces up to the prospect of being jobless and homeless in a strange town . . .

1934 - Elinor M Brent-Dyer - Carnation Of The Upper Fourth - Lutterworth.  Carnation de Lisle has joined Shapcott High School.  Her mother having died when she was born, she had lived a wandering life with her father, a musician and composer - as such she knew various languages and cultures but had never been to school, until they settled at Shapcott and Aunt Nancy joins them as housekeeper.  At school she meets Madge Harley, one of a large family who lives on the same street, and is a Guide - and Madge coaches her through her Tenderfoot tests.  But Carnation finds it difficult to fit in at school . . .

1934 - HB Davidson - Brenda In Belgium - Sheldon Press.  Unable to go home for the school holidays due to her brother having measles, Brenda joins her classmate Ruth, who is spending the holidays in Belgium, in the home of her old nanny.  Whilst there, they meet with the local Guides and share in adventure . . .

1934 - Pat Gordon - Madcap Petrina - Hutchinson.  Petrina Applebee, a fruit-rancher's daughter from California, arrives at Heathfield School in England at age 13, unaccustomed to discipline or being declined her wishes.  She finds an English girls' boarding school very different . . .

1934 - Mary Lean - Joan Of Glen Garland - RTS.  A Company of Canadian Girl Guides from Toronto are tasked with building a hut in the Don Valley for a Guide competition - and have adventures in creating and using it . . . 

1934 - Violet M Methley - Mystery Camp - Blackie.  7th Knutsbridge Guides are in the lorry with all their gear, ready to head off for a three-week camp in the New Forrest, and are just waiting for their Lieutenant to arrive, Captain having headed off the day before.  Bat at Lieutenant's approach it is clear that something is wrong - Captain has been in an accident and is in hospital with a broken leg, and as they had the New Forest site on condition that Captain was present, the camp's off.  Then Lieutenant has an idea, and manages to get permission for them to camp in the grounds of Favour Royal, the Earl of Lorimer's empty house.  While the Guides explore the overgrown kitchen garden in search of fruit and veg they see a strange sight in the fruit-bush thicket - "there came a most unearthly and hideous yell, a kind of wailing howl . . . at the same moment a face was thrust forward through the tangle, fiercely, threateningly . . ."

1934 (c) - Elisabeth Mumford - Judy Joins The Jasmines - CSSM.  Judy Stanisford lives with her mother, a widow who is not in good health.  Her doctor recommends a stay at a Hydro in Germany, which would involve Judy going to Hadley Court boarding school.  On the train to school she is joined in her carriage by fellow pupils Nella, Jill, and Sheila Massinger, all Guides.  On arriving at school she finds that she is in a small dorm with Sheila, and Anna Aldonova, who weren't expecting a 'third' - and Anna is not happy about it . . .

1934 - Mrs A.C. Osborn Hann - Captain - Partridge.  Vonnie Mayhew was an only child, who lived on a farm and was kept indoors due to frequent bouts of illness, and away from the 'rough village girls'.  The latter part was understandable, as Topsy, Sallie and Margie were troublemakers at school, and the despair of their teacher.  In revenge for a deserved detention they sneaked up to the school after dark on a Saturday, helped their younger brothers climb into the classroom by means of a window with a broken catch, and set them to vandalising the classroom, , leading to an appearance in the Police Court, and fines.  Then two newcomers move into thatched cottage - Hilary,Winslow and her younger sister Brenda.  They consider setting up a village Guide Company - then the Vicar calls and asks if they would consider starting Guides - the remaining challenge is persuading the parents . . .

1934 - Sibyl B Owsley & AC Osborn Hann - Three Guides Adventuring - John F Shaw.  We follow three Guides from the Ladymead Company - Nicolette Hatherall,her Cousin Elspeth, and Laurie Dawson.  Nicolette and Elspeth take up work, Nicolette as a haberdashery apprentice and Elspeth as a nurse probationer, while Laurie, the daughter of the lighthouse keeper and his wife, goes home to help her parents at the lighthouse.  Each has adventures . . .

1934 - Mary Shrewsbury - All Aboard the "Bundy" - Pilgrim Press.  A group of Sea Rangers in a school company are leaving school, but arrange one last holiday together at the home of Nancy, one of the Sea Rangers, in Cornwall.  Just before cam the group discover that Nancy's family have had a financial crash.  By the time the group arrive, the home and car are gone and baliffs at the house, so they sail out to an island in Nancy's own boat to camp in a cave, in hiding.  Then they spot strange goings-on . , .

1934 - Ethel Talbot - Betty And The Brownies - Warne.  Nancy is the new Sixer at her boarding school's pack, as the former Sixer (and her best friend) left at the end of last term.  A new girl, Betty, joins the school, having been living in India - Nancy had hoped for a recruit to fill her Six's vacancy, but Betty declares Brownies to be babyish, and refuses to join - but why . . . ?  

1934 - Kathleen M Willcox - The Stanford Twins at St Faith's - G.O.P.  Twins Janet and Marjory - or Jan and Jo - live on a farm in Canada built up by their parents.  A friend of their father's offers to pay for the education of both, with all related expenses - provided it is at a school in England.  There they take part in all the school activities, and get in various scrapes - including during Guide camp . . .

1935 - H.B. Davidson - The Brownie Village - Lutterworth Press.  A meeting is called at the school for all girls aged over 8 - a Brownie unit was being formed for the 12 girls of the right age - with every girl joining, it was going to be a Brownie village . . .

1935 - Margaret Middleton - The Island Camp - Blackie.  Patrol Leaders Philippa, Joe and Hester are camping independently next door to the Company Camp.  The 'mystery house' nearby, which they had seen at last year's camp, is now let, they find the occupants - a lady who wears high heels and a foreign manservant - curious . . .

1935 - Ursula Moray Williams - Adventures Of Anne - Harrap.  A series of short stories about Brownie Anne and her adventures: Anne In Switzerland, The Ponies, Anne And The Circus Pony, Anne And The Copycat, and, Magicking Miss Manderson.

1935 - Mrs AC Osborn Hann - Lieutenant - RTS.  Brenda Winslow, Lieutenant of 1st Shenstone, is preparing to take the Guides to camp - although her elder sister Hilary Graham is still the registered Captain, it is Brenda who runs the Company.  The newly-formed Poppy Patrol are especially keen on their forthcoming camp . . .

1935 - Ethel Talbot - Brownie Island - Warne.  Brown Owl, a teacher, lives at Riverweir during the school holidays - this year she invites her small Pack to come with her to stay there, and to sail to River Island . . .

1935 - Ethel Talbot - Sea Rangers All - Warne.  Six Sea Rangers, all pupils at St Treen's School, get permission to go on a sailing holiday together at Pengorm in Cornwall, in their last term at school.  One of the group, Hilda, lived there during the holidays, but financial difficulties were forcing her to leave school at the end of term, and her house there was up for sale, meaning a stay at her nanny's cottage.  They soon realise they are in a part of the country where superstitions are followed . . .

1936 - HB Davidson - How Judy Passed Her Tests - Sheldon Press.  Judy Challoner has left India and come to live with her Aunt, she expects living in the country to be dull, but meets Anne, who invites her to join Guides - and her adventures begin . . .

1936 - FOH Nash - Richenda In The Alps - Sheldon Press.  Richenda Arden is at school, and receives a letter from her friend Gwenneth Wynne.  Gwenneth's mother is a film star, and as her next role is a French one, she plans to travel there to pick up the atmosphere and accent, and invites both girls to travel to France too, to spend part of the time with her and part with a professor friend to improve their french.  Once her mother's approval for the journey is received, Richenda is ready for her first trip abroad . . .

1936 - AC Osborn Hann - The Redheaded Patrol - RTS.  The Scarlet Pimpernel Patrol happen all to have red hair, and with their ringleader Judy, they are the terror of the Company.  The other Patrol Leaders despair of doing anything with them, but Ray has an idea . . .

1936 - Diana Pares/Frederica Bennett - The Guides of Fairley and other stories of school and adventure (Elizabeth and Beth) - Epworth Press.  Although billed as several stories, there is the title story and one other.  The Guides of 1st Fairley are based at Fairley Lodge boarding school, proud of their clubroom and their progress at badges.  The 2nd Fairley are based in the village, and attended by working class girls - and have been without a Captain.  So - a merger is proposed - the girls of neither company are keen on the chalk-and-cheese experiment . . .

Beth Smith was on board boat, sailing away from the quayside where her parents were watching and waving farewell as she set off on the three week journey to England, where she is to be met by her Aunt - whom she hasn't seen before.  But - she wasn't the only Miss Elizabeth Smith on board due to meet an Aunt she hasn't seen before . . .

1937 - Catherine Christian - The Marigolds Make Good - Blackie.  The headmistress of St Bridget's School finds it has become slack - with falling results both academically or in sport - so rules that the school Guide Company shall be suspended until progress is made.  The Marigold Patrol decide to carry on independently . . .

1937 - HB Davidson - Billy Goes To Camp - Sheldon Press.  On the train to Melrose School Billy gets out at a wayside stop in search of a chocolate vending machine, overhears a disembarking family talking of their route to nearby caves, and doesn't hear the train departing behind her until it is too late.  With no train for hours, Billy decides that she may as well go to the caves.  Slipping in with the family, she opts to leave the main tour group, and meets another escapee from the tour group, a Guide, Ray.  Billy joins up with her, and gets a lift on their coach, which is heading back to their school - when the bus arrives Billy discovers she is at - Melrose School!  Ray joins the Guides, just in time to join the Company's camp . . .

1937 - Theo Lynch - Adventures Of The Eastmere Guides - Partridge.  Miss Clifton first encounters the Eastmere girls when out on a walk - they had organised a paper chase but Doris, one of the hares, had tripped and hurt her wrist, and her friends were looking for an adult to help fetch a doctor.  Whilst tending to Doris's wrist, Miss Clifton discovers that there aren't any organised activities for girls in Eastmere beyond what they arrange for themselves, and determines to start Guides.  There is difficulty over persuading the Vicar, and more difficulty in persuading the Parish Council, but Miss Clifton gets her way . . .

1937 - Ivy FE Middleton - The Adventures Of The Scarlet Pimpernel Patrol - Sheldon Press.  Kay Danvers, Scarlet Pimpernel PL in the 1st Redbridge Company, is tasked by her Patrol with writing a play about 'The Scarlet Pimpernel' for their contribution to the Company's fundraising concert.  As they are rehearsing they hear a crash outside, and find an injured girl, wearing a Guide badge, has come off her bicycle while cycling home in the thick fog outside.  The girl is desperate to find a phone as whilst on her way she heard two voices talking, seemingly suggesting they planned to carry out a burglary . . . 

1937 - Phyllis I Norris - The Mystery Of The White Ties - Sheldon Press.  Clifford Bramley and Derry Hastings have recently married - and with both being orphans with younger sisters, they have merged their families - Clifford's sisters Betty and Daphne, and Derry's sisters Madge and Una.  All have moved to a new house in Gorseley.  All have been Guides but, on hearing the local Guides have no spaces, they decide to set up a secret Patrol of their own, and test the Guide skills of the Gorseley Guides . . .

1937 - Sibyl B Owsley - A Round-The-Year Brownie Book - Girl's Own Paper.  Annual-style book.  Stories: Wee Folk, A Happy New Year, Thinking Day, The Wolf Cub Pup, Two Tweenies, The Song Of The Storm, Lily Flower, A Tail Of Woe, Wendy Goes Wandering, The Tweeny Who Couldn't Laugh, The Sign Of The Three Owls, The Golden Journey, The Eve O The Golden Hand, Brownies Grow Up, Through Sylvia's Eyes, Hide And Seek, and, A Birthday Story.

1937 - Ethel Talbot - Sea Rangers' Holiday - Warne.  Four Sea Rangers are holidaying for a week at Round Hill Grange, belonging to a friend of one of the parents, before returning to school.  They had written - but when they arrived at the station there was no-one to meet them, and having squeezed onto the local bus - horse-drawn.  On arrival they found Round Hill Grange empty, and the locals unfriendly - why . . . ?

1938 - Doreen Ireland - Margery-The Mystery - Epworth Press.  Margery Bell joins Bargate school on the same day as a lively American Girl Scout, and is initially overshadowed, finding herself among the school's non-Guides - but one of the girls - Jasmine - treats her oddly and calls her 'Gerry', and accuses her of being in parts of the school she has not been in . . .

1938 - Ivy F.E. Middleton - Kay of the Pimpernels - published by R.T.S.   Part of her 'Kay' series, this story focuses on Patrol Leader Kay, supported by her Second, Peggy, and the other Patrol members 'the Babe', 'Bubbles', Tess, Jean and Jill.  Her first book accepted by a publisher, Kay organises a Patrol literary party, ends up visiting London, and meets up with 'the three Musketeers', a group of London Ranger Guides.  

1938 - Ethel Talbot - Rangers and Strangers - Nelson.  The Sea Ranger crew from the Midlands are camping at St Pen's in Cornwall.  Although they had assumed there would be both, on arrival, although they find a campsite, they find neither a village nor any prospect of a boat they could hire.  The next morning they discover it consists of one cottage, occupied by an old lady whose son is at sea, who offered provisions, and use of a boat.  But - who are the two strange men who arrive demanding use of the boat, and what are they up to?

1938 - Marjorie Taylor - With the Speedwell Patrol - Blackie.  Patrol Leader Mary Blair overhears her new next door neighbour, an invalid girl, Dawn, who lives with her Aunt, playing violin in the garden.  Mary and her younger brothers and sisters befriend Dawn, who lost her father in an air accident shortly before her accident.  Doctors recommend that Dawn should travel abroad for the benefit of her health - and that Mary should accompany her.  While there, Mary meets a man at a nearby sanatorium who was the engineer of Dawn's father's plane . . .

1939 - EMR Burgess - Hilary Follows Up - Blackie.  The Peridew sisters all attended Merevaile School - and each had made a name for herself at sport, living and breathing cricket, hockey, tennis . . .  The eldest was Hester, who had got 'colours' at every possible game, then Hope who had been hockey and tennis captain, and then Honor, a demon fast bowler now attending Physical Training College.  Now the latest Peridew, Hilary, has arrived at the school, and it is assumed by pupils and teachers alike that she will match their sporting records if not exceed them.  Whereas Hilary has a far wider range of interests - not just games . . .

1939 - Catherine M. Christian - A Schoolgirl From Hollywood - Blackie.  Marilene Yates was a child actress in Hollywood before being sent to school in England.  In her first school her fame was known, and fellow pupils flocked round fussing over her, and doing work for her, resulting in her being expelled.  Her Aunt Jackie changes her name back to the original Mary Ellen, and sends her to the spartan Whitehaven School she had attended.  She meets fellow new pupil Lindsay Graham, and on arrival find the school a shadow of it's former glory, and the Guide company (membership compulsory) gone slack.  Lindsay, with Mary Ellen's support, sets up the Phoenix Patrol, to get the school back on track.

1939c - HB Davidson - A Gipsy Brownie - RTS.  Anne Barnes is missing her friend Winnie, who has just moved away.  Anne's family live in an estate cottage on the Hazlehurst estate.  Having heard that gypsies had arrived and were camping nearby, she was surprised to find one joining her school class - and noticing her alone at break time, Anne tries inviting her to join the group of friends, but she declines.  Then following a playground fight amongst a group of boys, the girl runs out of the playground into the street - and is involved in a car accident and slightly injured - Anne is asked to escort the girl home as she lives nearby, and starts telling her about Brownies - so Birdie comes along to the next Brownie meeting . . .

1939 - Joan Herbert - One's A Pair - Partridge.  Diana Barton and her 13-year-old brother Dick live at Hilton Towers, the family home for generations.  But with both parents now dead, their only close relative was their mother's brother, Brandon Berry, recently arrived from South Africa.  He is firmly of the belief that the logical option would be that they sell Hilton Towers and go to live with him in South Africa.  Immediately, Uncle Brandon arranged for Dick to go with him to South Africa and Diana to return to her boarding school.  But Diana fears leaving the house with only the servants in occupation, and when she bumps into a girl in a photographer's shop who could almost be her twin, a plan forms . . .

1939 - Ivy F.E. Middleton - Triumphant Pimpernells - Lutterworth Press.  Kay Danvers and her Patrol in 1st Redbridge continue their adventures, trying to raise funds to buy a radiogram for a lonely old lady as a Patrol good turn.  They enter a film review competition with a cash prize in hopes of putting it towards buying a radio, and take part in The Guide magazine's Christmas Stocking Trail . . .

1939 - Sibyl B. Owsley - Brownie Gold - Lutterworth Press.  Collection of short stories - Kathleen's Key, February Face, One Little Welsh Girl, He Kindled a Fire, The Hazel Wood, Too Tame a Dragon, The Golden Flute, The Real Maureen, A Brownie and Cordelia, Vanessa and Brownie Magic, Brownie Wings, Crossed Crutches, Brownies Get Busy, and, Mrs Murphy's Jane.

1939 - Nora Pitt - Fernhill Adventures - RTS.  With several girls having moved off to Guides, and the new housing not yet built, the Fernhill Preparatory School Brownie Pack, containing 12 Brownies (albeit one was underage) was small - but it didn't stop them having adventures . . .

1939 - Marjorie Taylor - Prior's Island - Blackie.  Doreen Craig was Patrol Leader of the Poppies, a rather disunited Patrol - she, Betty, Jean and Kate went to the High School, but Milly went to a Board school, whereas Patrol Second Thelma went to a small private school - Milly and Thelma regularly clashed.  Doreen's own father was an archeologist, who was due to go to Greece, meantime Doreen would spend the school holiday at a cottage with her old Nanny - but when Nanny falls ill shortly before her father's departure, and he worries of her being there alone, she proposes that the Patrol could join her for a fortnight.  She visits their families to set it up - what she discovers at Thelma's and Milly's houses changes her views of both of them . . .

1940 - Catherine Christian - Diana Takes a Chance - Blackie.  Diana Tremaine, who has recently quit her Swiss finishing school, is told that the ancestral family home had to be sold, her mother was going to remarry, and while her mother and stepfather travelled to Australia to try to set up a new family home there, Diana would look after her new stepbrother and stepsister in a flat in London.  There she meets the neighbours, including Sally Sparrow, a Ranger . . .

1940 - Ivy Middleton - The Fourth Musketeer - Lutterworth Press.  Kay Danvers and her parents are moving to London - and at a week's notice.  It will mean leaving her Guide Patrol - but on a visit to London the previous year she met a Ranger Leader, Miss Grey, and a trio of her Rangers, nicknamed the musketeers - Kay hopes to be accepted as a member of their gang . . .

1940 - Marjorie Taylor - The Highland School - Epworth Press.  Christine Desmond lives in Glasgow with her father, mother (who suffers ill health) and medical student brother, who is over-working for a scholarship prize. Christine wins a scholarship to the Highland School, which has a high reputation.  There she is involved in anonymously writing a school play for performance at the end-of-term prizegiving - and finds herself cast in one of the leading roles.  At the end of term a Guide camp is held near Loch Lomond, after which Christine is due to stay with her French schoolfriend on a remote island.  There she hears a radio report that her beloved brother is missing . . .

1941 - Catherine Christian - Harriet-The Return of Rip Van Winkle - Pearson.  Dr Harriet Gore, a former Guider, is just returned from ten years working abroad, with hopes of taking up Guiding again.  She discovers many changes, amongst her former Guides, and also in Guiding . . .

1942 - Catherine Christian - Harriet Takes The Field - Pearson.  Dr Harriet Gore, now Lady North after her recent marriage, has come to live in Irminster, taking over both the house, and the District Commissioner post, held by the late Lady Felicity Harman.  She faces the challenge of winning over the Guiders in her District, with their differing personalities and outlooks - and prepare the District for the threat of World War 2 and the effects it might have on them . . .

1942 - Catherine Christian - The Kingfishers See It Through - Blackie.  The survival of the Guide Company is threatened by the rival attraction of the new Youth Squad - especially as many of the Guides have been half-hearted for some time in the absence of Guiders.  One of the younger Guides, Paddy, is determined to change things and if the Kingfishers were willing to keep going under their new Leader Sylvie, she could write to her sister Lorn for advice.  Then Paddy admits to Sylvie that Lorn is fictional, and Sylvie faces the problem of drafting letters to the Patrol from the fictional Lorn . . .

1943 - Jennifer Ford - Patsy Podger Plays The Game - Harrap.  A small book written by a 15-year old Guide, about a girl becoming a Brownie and tackling her first good turn . . .

1944 - Catherine Christian - The School At Emery's End - Pearson.  Orphaned themselves, adult Elspeth and her schoolgirl sisters, Gillian and Molly Hardy inherit an orphanage from their crochety old Uncle on condition they occupy it for three years; and as Elspeth cannot leave her job, Gillian and Molly give up their planned move to St Anselm's Boarding school, and instead go to Emery's End.  They find it is akin to a victorian workhouse, but does have a secret Guide Patrol . . .

1944 - Carol Forrest - Patteran Patrol - Pearson.  Berry, a member of the Wagtail Patrol, is left a gypsy caravan by her late Uncle and offers use of it as a Patrol headquarters, and PL Chris arranges for most of the Patrol to visit and collect it, and take it back.  PS Penny introduces a new recruit to the Patrol, a German refugee, Gerda, who had been sent by Penny's Aunt Flick.  When they get to the field the caravan is gone - taken that morning.  Meantime the two who stayed back, Gerda and Pam, spend part of the day helping look after infants, then visit the home of Pam's scientist father.  Pam discovers that, behind her back, Gerda slipped into the scientist's study unauthorised.  The next day, important papers belonging to Pam's father are discovered to be missing . . .

1944 - Ivy FE Middleton - Red Trefoil - Lutterworth Press.  Four ex-Rangers opt to leave their separate digs and move into a house together, which they name Red Trefoil.  They opt to volunteer for war work, and also to re-join Rangers, and find themselves putting their new Ranger training to good use . . .

1944 - D.V. O'Brien - The Three at St Christopher's - Hutchinson.  Fiona, Pamela and Isabel are initially reluctant Guides, and pupils at St Christopher School, the book follows their school adventures . . .

1945 - Carol Forrest - Two Rebels and a Pilgrim - Pearson.  Chris and Penny are Patrol Leaders, but have become bored of Guides, wanting to explore.  They had asked their Captain about doing outdoor activities, but her health wasn't good, and although she had suggested they could take the Company out, Penny and Chris felt anxious about doing it.  They're overheard by Penny's Aunt Flick, who suggests that if they're getting nothing out of Guiding and putting little in, they should resign.  She offers them the chance to join her on a walking tour of England, and sets them to planning the adventure . . .

1946 - EMR Burgess - Cherry Becomes International - Arthur H. Stockwell.  With her parents bound for South America for a year in connection with her father's work, Cherry England is sent to an international boarding school in Switzerland, Pensionnat La Marjolaine.  The girls who have been Guides before coming to the school form an 'International Patrol', adopting ideas from the programmes of each of their countries . . .

1946 - Catherine Christian - The Seventh Magpie - Blackie.  The Carrier Pigeon Patrol are out on a hike, and during it see seven magpies.  From then on their good fortune turns - they are wrongly accused of starting a grass fire, and decide to 'go underground', training in secret . . .  Reprinted as "Sally Joins The Patrol".

1946 - AC Osborn Hann - Chris At Boarding School - Lutterworth Press.  Two new girls join dormitory B at Beechlands - vicar's daughter Chris Cunningham and farm manager's daughter Josephine Fenton - before they even arrive the other girls in the dormitory object, as two of their friends have been moved out, part of a move by the matron to split up troublemakers, though three remained - and kept up the tricks . . .

1947 - Catherine Christian - Phyllida's Fortune - Newnes.  With the death of their father, and resulting death duties, Phyllida Olcott's family have had to move out of their ancestral home, Queen's Langley, which has been let, while the Olcotts have moved into a smaller house nearby - Stone House.  And with her mother ill with flu, it is Phyllida who has to go to the station to meet her returning siblings and break the news to them.  They find it difficult to adjust - and it isn't made easier when they receive invitations to the annual Boxing Day party in Queen's Langley which they used to host . . .

1947 - Carol Forrest - The Quest of The Curlews - Newnes.  Captain had warned the Guides that their traditional access to the Manor grounds had been rescinded by the new owners.  "That's an order.  No questions."  Most of the Company understood the new people wanting the place to themselves.  But, not knowing the reason why, the Curlews pledged themselves to solving the puzzle . . .

1947 - MM Green - Schoolgirl Janet - Blackie.  Janet Lea is sitting the exam for the County School, the one her best friend joined a year ago.  But though she gets a place in the school, she doesn't get to join her at the seaside Guide Camp - partly because her parents consider her too delicate, partly because they have a family seaside holiday planned.  Whilst at the beach Janet meets Miki and Cecile Muller, from Switzerland.  Her parents arrange for her to visit the Guide Camp for the day - but she ends up staying longer . . .

1947 - Mrs A.C. Osborn Hann - More Fun in the Country - Lutterworth Press.  Twins Peter and Prue have moved from London to the country with their parents, and have various adventures, including joining Wolf Cubs and Brownies . . .

1948 - Nancy Breary - It Was Fun In The Fourth - Nelson.  At first Diana Lindsey wished she had never gone to Leighton Grange school - she had no special chum and felt out of things - until she found her feet in the Daffodil Patrol . . .

1948 - EMR Burgess - Ready For Anything - Arthur H Stockwell.  Noel Baring is new to Greenacres and has just joined the Greenacres Guides - who have a poor reputation due to their previous leadership.  The new Captain is go-ahead, and as Noel was a Patrol Second in her old Company, she is made PL, and they opt to become the Holly Patrol - whose motto is 'ready for anything'.  But when Noel chooses the Patrol hike over playing tennis with some classmates from "The Cedars" a school "for the daughters of gentlemen" including Eve the Form Captain, she is assumed to be a prig - none of The Cedars' pupils are Guides.    It isn't helped when Noel's superior hockey sees her knock Eve's best friend from the Second XI . . .

1948 - Antonia Forest - Autumn Term - Faber & Faber.  Twins Nicola and Lawrie long to live up to, or even improve upon, their elder sisters' reputations - but it doesn't work out as planned . . .

1948 - C.R. Mansell - The Ragtail Patrol - Black.  Judy had moved to Ferrar's Booth, discovered a Guide Hall, but found to her disappointment that there were no Guiders, and the Guides too busy arguing or fighting or messing around to notice her.  On meeting the Patrol Leaders, who were meeting in a side room, they advised they had just decided to disband the Guide company.  On discussion, the PLs reveal that there are 6 troublemakers who lead the rest astray.  Judy offers to take all the troublemakers into a separate Patrol, and be the reforming PL of it . . .   

1948 - F.O.H. Nash - Guides of the Glen School - Warne.  Sylvia Roberts had been living with her mother in a caravan, while her father was working abroad, and wereheading to visit her Aunt and Uncle, and their family.  Unknown to Sylvia, she was going to attend boarding school with her cousins, and join the school Guide Company.  She has various adventures . . .

1949 - M Vera Armstrong - Biddy The Brownie - Warne.  Biddy Green, Sixer of the Pixies, is heartbroken - at pack meeting Brown Owl announced that she was suddenly having to move away, and that Brownie meeting was to be the last one.  Then Biddy had an idea - the Pixies could meet every week and practice their Brownie skills, in hopes of one day finding a new Brown Owl . . .

1949 - Frederica Bennett - Harum-Scarum Jill - Wells Gardner.  Jill Curwen lives with her widower father, and is mature for her 12 years as a result.  Her father has been considering sending her to boarding school among girls her own age.  He receives an invitation to a skiing holiday in Austria with old friends, so, leaving Jill with a governess, he heads off - two months later Jill receives a letter from her father - amongst the group he met an old friend, has married her, and will be bringing her and her twin daughters home.  From the moment of their arrival, it is clear that neither the new Mrs Curwen, nor her daughters' French governess, approve of lively Jill.  As time passes, the twins cause trouble, Mademoiselle exagerates it, and Jill gets the blame, until Mrs Curwen persuades her husband that Jill must be sent away to school - Mrs Curwen registers her at Fendon College.  On her first night Jill discovers there is a new French mistress at the school - her sisters' holiday governess . . .

1949 - C.R. Mansell - The Littlest Guide - Lutterworth.  Lee Morris was small and grimy, and lived in a poor part of town by the docks - but she wanted to join the Guides, and joined the 14th Brownsea.  Though she was unlike the other Guides, not least in her outsize pre-war uniform, she was cheerful, independent and loyal - even though she had always to leave meetings early in order to go home and put the younger children to bed, as her mother worked evenings in a shop.  The Guides long to help her, but needed to find a way of doing it tactfully . . .

1949 - Sibyl B Owsley - Brownies All - Blackie.  Georgina MacVinnie is one of 12 Brownies in 1st Burrswood Pack.  She has many adventures, including one involving a toddler climbing up a high ladder . . .

1949 - Geoffrey Prout - Sea Rangers at Sloo - Blackie.  Tess, Joan and Monica head off on holiday to Sloo Manor on the Essex coast, and there encounter a Sea Ranger crew camping nearby.  The three join the Sea Rangers and encounter various adventures . . .

1950 - M. Vera Armstrong - Rival Camps - Warne.  As soon as Paddy Keane and her three wildlife-watcher friends hear that a Company of Girl Guides is coming to camp in the next field, they determine to do all they can to drive the Guides away, for fear that the Guides will frighten away the animals they have been befriending.  Chris, the Guide Patrol Leader, is equally determined not to leave, and to try to show the rebels that they are mistaken . . .

1950 - Winifred Scott - Girl Castaways - Pickering & Inglis.  Sea Rangers Audrey and Monica spot an unusual yacht on their way to muster, then on their way home hear splashing and voices at the bottom of the cliff, as if men have landed there by fishing boat.  The next day they head off early to explore, and find the yacht gone.  Having abseiled down the cliff they head into the cave, through several tunnels to a cavern.  Near the cave entrance they find a hut and, the door being unlocked, they go in, and explore it, finding a radio.  When they turn to leave they discover they've been followed - facing them is a man pointing a gun . . .

1950 - Various - The Guide Gift Book - The Girl Guides Association.  Collection of short stories and articles.  Stories: The Astonishing Island, Curfew At Sunset, The Fly-Posters, The Flower-Show Hat, and, The Cobbler.

1950 - Doreen Wyld - The Girls of Queen's Mere - Blackie.  Jean Ogilvie faces many problems as the new Form Prefect of the Fifth.  There is the deposed former form captain, the mysterious Kerena, the arrival of Thelma, and the new Guide and Ranger Companies . . .

1951 - AC Osborn Hann - It's Fun In The Guides - Lutterworth Press.  All the girls in the village joined the new Guide Company - except Penny.  Her parents dead, she and her two brothers and sister lived with her Aunt, although it was Penny who did most of the housework.  Her Aunt didn't hold with Guides, considering it 'a pack o' nonsense' - and the Guide Captain isn't able to persuade her otherwise - so Penny becomes a Guide in secret . . .

1952 - F.O.H. Nash - Second Class Judy - Warne.  Guide Judy Redford longs to go to camp with her Company - but there is a problem.  For Judy lives with her disagreeable Aunt Gladys while her father is in Australia trying to build a life for them both, while sending back money towards her keep.  Although she usually attends Guide meetings, it is only if housework allows, and attending Guiding activities outwith forbidden - meaning that 14-year-old Judy hasn't been able to finish Second Class yet.  Then the chance of camp comes, and Captain manages to work on Aunt Gladys until she agrees to Judy attending - and the Headmistress offers Judy and two other Guides work clearing up after school dinners for sixpence a day each, which can go towards their pocket money.  Judy can go on her first ever holiday . . .

1953 - M. Vera Armstrong - Maris of Glenside - Warne.  Maris Michael lived in Kashmir with her guardians until she came to Glenside School.  She was dissapointed to discover there was no school Guide Company, until during a walk she meets a Guide Patrol from a neighbouring school, and becomes a secret Lone Guide . . .

1953 - AC Osborn Hann - Tomboy Terry - Lutterworth.  Terry and Rosemary were next door neighbours, but quite unalike.  Rosemary was an only child, always having to be careful of her clothes for fear of getting them dirty, whereas Terry was one of a long family, and a tomboy.  In spite of her mother's concerns, Rosemary joins Terry in her adventures . . .

1953 - Mildred A Wirt - The Brownie Scouts At Windmill Farm - Cupples And Leon Company.  The Rosedale Brownie Girl Scouts are invited to help with the Rosedale Annual Tulip Show . . .

1954 - Freda Collins - The Beauty Quest Book for Brownies - University of London Press.  The book is presented as monthly challenges in nature study, along with short stories, challenges and puzzles.  

1954 - Susan Jolly - Marigold Becomes A Brownie - Blackie.  Marigold is told by her Gran and Aunt Edith that everything needs to be tidy at home tomorrow because Marigold's father is bringing a visitor.  When she pressed them on who the visitor would be, they told her - "a lady, who was to become her mother."  So Marigold ran away . . .

1954 - CR Mansell - Curlew Camp - Lutterworth Press.  The Guides of the Curlew Patrol have been hoping for adventure - and they get it when they find the camp they are to join in the country near the Welsh coast - does not exist!

1955 - Freda Collins - The Pack That Ran Itself - University of London Press.  The woodland pack consisted of only five Brownies, each of whom had an animal nickname.  But they faced a problem - Brown Owl is ill and has to go abroad to recover, and there is no Tawny Owl - and with Brown Owl's house shut up, no meeting place either - and two of the five would be heading away to boarding school soon.  They decide to continue meeting, in the woods, without Guiders . . .

1955 - Mrs A.C. Osborn Hann - Terry's Adventures - Lutterworth.  Tomboy Terry, her brother Robin, and friend Angela live next door to Rosemary - and Rosemary's mother dreads her turning into a tomboy like Terry.  Terry and Angela have been Brownies, but are preparing to fly up to Guides - and go to camp . . .

1957 - Mary Bard - Just Be Yourself - Hammond, Hammond.  Located in the USA, the writer's children are encouraged to join Brownie Girl Scouts by Phyllis, an enthusiastic Brownie who Expands on the benefits at every opportunity - but there are no spaces nearby.  So, with the youngest of her daughters having started school, she finds herself starting a Brownie Troop . . .

1957 - Anne Bradley - The Problem Patrol - Lutterworth.  It would have been fine if our Captain hadn't fallen ill and had to cancel our camp - as it was, just before her operation she had written to a Guider friend to see if there were spare places at her camp - and that's how three of us ended up heading to Pye Nest Hall - and split up into different Patrols in a joint camp.  Jenny, used to her sister taking charge, was allocated being Patrol Leader, in charge of Caecelia, Theodosia and Marlene.  Instead of Marlene, her young sister Dawn turns up, having slipped away from home.  Caecelia considers learning camp skills a waste of her time and doesn't listen to instructions, whereas Theo is so keen to be helpful but clueless that she is as likely to spoil work that has already been done as achieve any to her own credit . . .

1957 - Freda Collins - The Woodland Pack - University Of London Press.  One of the Brownies, known as Blackbird, has been ill and is sent to the seaside to recuperate, and the rest of the pack join her there - leading to them having an adventure in a cave . . .

1957 - Various - The Third Rucksack Book - Blandford.  Compilation of articles, short stories and puzzles.  Stories: A Sixth Pilgrim, Observation Adventure, Picnic In December, Hiking Hitch, Four Boys In A Boat, Ponsonby, Tess Swims Alone, Rescue At Seal Island, Thrill At Trebarvan, Guide's Honour, and, Pat's Imagination.

1958 - Anne Bradley - The Guides in Hanover Lane - Lutterworth.  The First Flaxminster Company have lost their headquarters and Guiders, and Beechy Stansfield has to ask the grand Miss Flemming at Hanover Lodge if the Guides may meet in her old laundry - she agrees only on condition that her niece Erica, who lives with her, is present each week to monitor behaviour.  The Guides are not welcomed by the local teddy-girls, who for a joke send in two recruits, Julie and Deanna.  Will 1st Flaxminster survive?

1960 - Freda Collins - Barny and the Big House Pack - University of London Press.  The woodland pack have been scattered while the Big House is undergoing alterations, to become a home for Polish girls living in camps in Europe . . .

1960 - Cris Johnson - The Rising Of The Larks - The Children's Press.  A Guide Company comes to Brantwood for it's annual camp, and grocer's assistant Gipsy Latimer is so impressed with what she sees of them during their week in camp that she is determined to set up a Guide Company.  With her friends Lorna and Glynis, she starts the Skylark Patrol and tackles the challenge head-on . . .

1962 - Freda Collins - Pack Tales - University of London Press.  Book of short stories: The First Pack Tale, Bossy Bessie, Great-Grandmother's Doll, The Brave Brownie, The Almond Nut, The Brownie Who Grew Long Ears, The Mountain Chalet, The Lonely Leprechaun, The Four Jays, The Feathery Father Christmas, The Guy Outside The Gates and The Little Brown Donkey.

1963 - Ailsa Brambleby - Three For Trouble - Knight Books.  Triplets Kay, Sandra and Linda join the pack - but their reputation for causing trouble has gone before them - and their enthusiasm for doing good turns leads them into all sorts of scrapes . . .

1963 - Freda Collins - The Good Turn Hunters - Brockhampton Press.  Twins and Brownies Nicky and Jill move to Nobden, As the town they are moving to does not have a unit, they accept their Brown Owl's challenge to become good turn hunters . . .

1964 - Julie Bonner - A Pack Of Trouble - World Distributors.  Micky Hartley, a Brownie Sixer in the Tallsteeples Pack, wants her Six to solve a problem.  Their Guider, Miss Cracknell, keeps having to cancel pack meetings when her elderly mother is ill.  Karen's mother is a health visitor and Karen advises that her mother had said Mrs Cracknell wasn't really ill, she was just acting up.  Micky decides that the Pixies should try to solve the problem . . .

1964 - Julie Bonner - The Fix-It Six - World Distributors.  Tallsteeples has decided to enter the 'Prettiest Village in England' competition, and the Tallsteeples Brownies are determined to help, especially Micky and her Pixie Six.  They come up with lots of improvement ideas - and get into lots of adventures . . .

1964 - Freda Collins - The Brownies and the Fam-Pig - Knight Books.  The book is a combination of a story, interspersed with articles, crafts and recipes.  The story element tells of a Brownie Pack who obtain a china pig and try to fundraise in order to fill it with money to donate to Oxfam, the Oxford Committee for Famine Relief.  During their fundraising efforts they pay imaginary visits to some of the countries they are fundraising for . . . 

1964 - Ivy F.E. Middleton - Chris Temple Patrol Leader - Victory Press.  Chris has been newly appointed Patrol Leader of the Poppies, and was looking forward to her new role.  During a Patrol wide game they meet Andrea, who is out with her Guide Dog, and they decide to raise the £250 cost of training a Guide Dog as a Patrol, and have adventures as they set to work to earn the funds . . .

1965 - Ailsa Brambleby - The Commonwealth Pack Story Book - Brockhampton Press.  A collection of short stories from eight Commonwealth countries, for Brownies.  Canada-Red for Danger.  Australia-Camera Clue.  India - Priti Wants an Adventure.  Zimbabwe - A Leopard for Linda.  New Zealand-Brownie Bookworm.  Pakistan-Wanted a Bluebird.  Australia-Kangaroos and Keys.  Jamaica and Great Britain-Thinking Day for Rosie.

1965 - Delia Huddy - Blackbirds' Barn - Constable Young Books.  Alice Turner is persuaded to join the local Guides, and unfortunately the shy girl is placed in a Blackbird Patrol notable for it's lack of team spirit - until they discover a tumbledown barn with the potential to be a meeting place for the Company . . .

1965 - Kevin McGarry - Blue Goose East - World Distributors.  Marty Dean travels to New York to spend the holidays with her father, a security officer for the Allied Governments, and her long-lost Aunt and cousins.  The adults away on business, Marty and her cousins stay at the family beach-house by the coast.  On the shore they find an unconscious man and bring him back to the house, where Marty starts first aid.  The man recovers consciousness momentarily, long enough to mutter "blue goose east" . . .

1965 - Kevin McGarry - The Monkey Puzzle - World Distributors.  Marty Dean is at school when she receives a cryptic telegram from her father, who works on security assignments for Allied Governments, indicating he would visit the school on Tuesday - and had a job for her . . .

1965 - Ive F.E. Middleton - A Challenge For The Poppies - Victory Press.  The Poppies are fundraising to sponsor their own Guide Dog puppy, and with one moneyspinner closed off to them, need fresh ideas and inspiration.  Then a new recruit offers the prospect of solving both problems . . .

1966 - Ivy FE Middleton - The Poppies And Mandy - Victory Press.  Having raised the money to train a Guide Dog puppy, the Poppy Patrol are looking for their next Patrol Good Turn, and opt to take a girl with cerebral palsy, Mandy, on outings during the interim before she goes to a special boarding school . . .

1968 - Robert Moss - The Challenge Book Of Brownie Stories - Purnell.  A selection of stories which previously appeared in the Brownie Annual: The Pack Holiday Mystery, The Brownie Who Couldn't Skip, The Good-Turn Treasure, The Strawberry Mystery, The Lost Brownie, The Brownie Who Told Fibs, How Brown Owl Became A Bride, Mistletoe For Miss Miggs, Green For Danger, Signpost To Danger, The Brownies' Bridge, Sarah The Slowcoach, Brenda And The Brownies, One Good Turn And No Hitches, No Pack For Peggy, The Brownie And The Tramp, Brownie On A Broomstick, The Witch Of Wardle Wood, Challenge For Cheryl, The Pack Without A Home, The Tree Rescue, and, The Brownie Who Didn't Like Dogs.

1968 - Pamela Sykes - Air Day For The Brownies - Knight Books.  The Brown Owl of the Barnwell Brownie Pack has organised a visit to an air day - and a stolen earing and a discarded match add to the excitement . . .

1970 - Jean Blathwayt - Lucy's Brownie Road - Brockhampton Press.  Lucy is working on her Hostess badge, but where the other candidates are hosting an open evening for mothers at the Brownie hall, Lucy wants to be more original . . .

1973 - Brenda May - The Lenderhand Brownies - Brown, Son & Ferguson.  In the village of Lenderhand, word soon spreads that Laburnum House has been sold to a Miss Jones.  Soon after moving in she starts a Brownie Pack, and the nine members have various adventures . . .

1976 - Pamela Sykes - The Brownies Throw A Party - Hodder & Stoughton.  When Susan, Tracey and Jane discover two little Asian boys lost in the park, they find themselves tackling a new Brownie Venture - but will it be ruined by the gang of boys from Bellview Mansions?

1977 - Jean Blathwayt - Brownie Discoverers - Knight Books.  Zoe is single-minded, caring passionately about nature and wildlife.  Kate, newly come to live in the country, likes Zoe for her knowledge of nature lore.  But being Zoe's friend is sometimes difficult, as Kate discovers when she joins the Brownies . . .

1979 - Dorothy Richardson - The Secret Brownies - Hodder and Stoughton.  Brown Owl announces that she is going to Australia for a long visit, which will leave the pack without a Guider.  Despite efforts in the interim, no-one is found, and on her last night, Brown Owl leaves them a present of a handmade carved wooden owl.  She tells the Brownies that the carver said there was a secret about the owl - but wouldn't tell her what.  They decide to continue as secret Brownies - and try to discover the owl's secret . . .

1981 - Robert Moss - Second Challenge Book of Brownie Stories - Starfish Books.  A selection of stories which had previously appeared in "The Brownie Annual" - Samantha's Good Turn, The Pack Venture Surprise, A Puma For A Pet, The Kite Challenge, Strange Happenings at Mermaid Cove, Pauline's Prize Pet, The Stone Gnome, Raiders In The Greenwood, Biddy and the Beasts, The Terror of the Pack, The Dangerous Short Cut, The Doll with One Eye, The Clumsiest Girl in the Pack, and Danger Tide

1984 - Dorothy Richardson - The Brownie Rescuers - Hodder and Stoughton.  During their hallowe'en party at their hall, the Brownies see a face at the window, then find a picture of a witch with a letter 'A' on it - what can it mean?

1985 - Dorothy Richardson - The Brownie Entertainers - Hodder and Stoughton.  The Brownies are heading off on a Brownie Holiday, and choose an enchanted castle theme.  Taking a wrong turning on the way to their holiday they find themselves outside Barnfield Castle, so stop to go in and explore - just the first of their adventures . . .

1986 - Dorothy Richardson - The Brownie Elephant Hunters - Hodder and Stoughton.  For Thinking Day, the Brownies want to raise money to send to the Guides and Brownies in Trinidad, who lost their headquarters in a cyclone.  The challenge is on to find goods for a 'white elephant' sale . . .

1987 - Dorothy Richardson - The Brownie Campaigners - Knight Books.  Ferndale was growing from village into town, and had a growing litter problem too.  The Pixie Six decide to start working on their Conservation badge, especially when they hear of plans for more housing on greenspace land . . .

1987 - Dorothy Richardson - The Brownie Foxwatchers - Hodder and Stoughton.  The Pixies have been challenged to catch up with the number of badges the other Sixes have, and opt to each work for either Pathinder or Rambler, three doing each.  When they suggest to Brown Owl that they could go to the new open-air museum's preview day as part of their badge-work, she agrees to go with them.  While tackling the nature trail, they see a fox in the undergrowth, and long to get a better look . . .

1991 - Gill Pawley - I'm a Rainbow Guide - Little Owl.  Katie and Naomi are Rainbows - the book follows their adventures in the unit

2005 - Katharine Bruce - Peace Comes To The Chalet School - Girls Gone By.  Summer term 1945, and the Brownies, Guides, Rangers and Cadets of the Chalet School are busy with badge work, and the Patrols take it in turns to help the locals in the nearby village with odd jobs - and have some misadventures!

2009 - Jane Berry - The Guides Of The Chalet School - Girls Gone By.  Madge Bettany, Headmistress of the Chalet School in Austria, determines to start Guiding there, so after attending a training in the holidays, both a Brownie Pack and a Guide Company are started.  But the girls are, if anything, just a little too keen to get on with their badge work . . .